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Meteorology at Texas A&M University

Information for this profile was provided by Kate Miller, Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A & M University. Information is also available on the program website. Students in this program are pursuing a bachelors degree.

Program Design & Assessment

Overview

The undergraduate curriculum in meteorology emphasizes weather and weather forecasting, but also includes courses in climatology, atmospheric chemistry, cloud physics and remote sensing of the atmosphere with radar and satellites. Study of these subjects relies on a foundation of physics, chemistry and mathematics.

Strengths of this program

Students in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences enjoy low student-to-teacher ratios and small classes. Undergraduates have opportunities for individual study and participation in faculty research projects, including regional, national and international field programs.

A unique strength of our program is the introduction of major courses earlier in the curriculum. Sophomores may take as many as five ATMO courses, which have been flexibly scaled to varying levels of mathematical and physical maturity. Typical peer curricula have very little coursework in the major until the junior year. Keeping students engaged in meteorology throughout their program is resulting in deeper understanding and practical ability at graduation.

The Department has a history of providing high quality High Impact Learning Experiences (HILE) and the number of these experiences has increased in recent years. Many individual faculty members provide one-on-one research experiences and opportunities to participate in field and laboratory measurements, satellite observations, and atmospheric models on a number of scales. Thus, motivated students leave our program with significant research experience. Coupled with outstanding facilities, including the Aggie Doppler Radar (ADRAD), two portable upper-air weather balloon systems, a science-grade Mesonet observing site, TV and radio broadcasting studios, and the 16-monitor Texas A&M Weather Center, students are more prepared than ever for careers in operations and/or research.

Our undergraduate curriculum (and faculty) is one of the strongest amongst our peers in Atmospheric Chemistry. Students are required to take additional basic chemistry, and have a required majors course in atmospheric chemistry. Electives offered in air pollution meteorology and in air chemistry laboratory methods prepare our students for the expanding field of environmental air quality.

Our curriculum is designed to meet or exceed National Weather Service and American Meteorological Society standards.

Types of students served

The Department of Atmospheric Sciences offers undergraduate students a B.S. in Meteorology. We also serve students in other disciplines through survey courses, which give students a better understanding of nature and of scientific methods, and through specialized courses for students in fields that require applied knowledge of meteorology. The Department of Atmospheric Sciences provides students with a wide variety of courses designed to fully prepare students for their chosen careers.

Program Goals

The goals of this program are as follows:

Our students develop a better understanding of nature and of scientific methods through specialized courses for students in fields that require applied knowledge of meteorology.
Specific learning outcomes are as follows:

The learning goals were informed by the following resources:

Our learning outcomes were informed by University-wide learning outcomes and have been refined and tailored to meet the specific goals of our program.

How program goals are assessed

Design features that allow goals to be met

As stated above, a strength of our program is the introduction of major courses earlier in the curriculum. Sophomores may take as many as five ATMO courses, which have been flexibly scaled to varying levels of mathematical and physical maturity. High Impact Learning Programs (HILP) are characterized by out-of-classroom, hands-on, and field experiences. Many individual faculty members provide one-on-one research experiences and opportunities to participate in field and laboratory measurements, satellite, and atmospheric models on a number of scales. Thus motivated students leave our program with significant research experience and are more prepared than ever for careers in operations and/or research.

Alumni Careers

Graduation rate

Year Students
2008 27
2009 34
2010 26
2011 24

Careers pursued by our alumni

Courses and Sequencing

Diagram of course sequencing and requirements



Supporting Materials

MET Program Description in Word (Microsoft Word 310kB May14 13)

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