Anne Egger

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Geological Sciences
Central Washington University

Anne Egger is an assistant professor at Central Washington University, where she has a joint appointment in Geological Sciences and Science Education. From 2004 to 2011, Anne was a lecturer and the Undergraduate Program Coordinator in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University. She ran the undergraduate research program in the Earth sciences at Stanford, taught introductory and field courses in geology, as well as a senior seminar, and was involved in recruiting students into the four undergraduate majors in the Earth sciences.

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (9)

Recognizing and mapping faults using lidar and field data part of Cutting Edge:Structural Geology:Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012:Activities
In this activity, students create a geologic map and cross-section of the Fish Springs cinder cone and surrounding area in the Owens Valley, CA, using a high-resolution DEM developed from airborne lidar data as a base map. The primary features that students learn to recognize and map are normal faults, alluvial fans of different ages, and the cinder cone itself.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Density, Isostasy, and Topography part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Activities
Two students measure the density of different rock types by first measuring water displacement of the irregular pieces. Details In this activity, students develop an explanation for the bimodal topography of the earth through measuring densities of rocks and wood blocks, deriving the isostasy equation, and applying their knowledge to estimate crustal thicknesses.

Using Field Observations and Field Experiences to Teach GeoscienceAn Illustrated Community Discussion part of Cutting Edge:Geoscience in the Field:Field Experiences:Posters
Students are introduced to sedimentary rocks through field observations and measurements of sediments in different environments. This allows them to proceed from processes to products and engages them through field work in the local area.

Exploring the nature of geoscience using cartoon cards part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
In this activity, groups of students work with a set of 13 cartoons printed on cards. Each group attempts to put them in order to tell a coherent story, articulating observations and inferences they made in order to do so. Groups share their stories with each other, which are very different. The activity offers the opportunity to highlight the differences between observation and inference, and between data and evidence. In addition, students see how the same observations can lead to a variety of inferences, that geological datasets are inherently incomplete, that sharing results with the community may lead to revision of ideas, and several other important aspects of the process of science are highlighted. Using cartoons provides an approach to these ideas that does not require content knowledge, and thus us very accessible for students with little background in science.

Introduction to the methods of geoscience part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
Secondary science education students read an article that describes methods of inquiry in Earth science and answer questions in preparation for developing lesson plans in Earth science. The article explicitly describes how the methods used in Earth science differ from those classically taught in school science, and provides a new framework for secondary science teachers to put in place in their teaching.

Introduction to Reading the Primary Literature part of Process of Science:Examples
This is a reading and homework assignment to introduce students to reading, understanding, and using the primary literature. In the reading, they are introduced to the idea that a scientific journal article is not usually read straight through the first time. The reading also describes why scientific journal articles have the form that they do, including how that form developed and why it continues. Students are then asked to critically read a journal article and answer a series of questions.

Seismicity and Relative Risk part of Starting Point-Teaching Entry Level Geoscience:Teaching with Data:Examples
This map shows global earthquake distribution and depth of earthquakes. Red = 0-33 km depth, yellow = 33-100 km, green = 100-400 km, blue = >400 km. Details This module provides an introduction to earthquakes using a guided inquiry exploration of the USGS earthquake website followed by an open-ended application of that knowledge to personal decision-making. It helps students move from thinking about single earthquakes to the longer term record, how they relate to plate boundaries, and the risks that we encounter with respect to earthquake hazards. The module consists of three parts:

Plate Tectonics Jigsaw part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Activities
Students participate in a jigsaw activity to learn about types of plate boundaries, becoming an expert in one of five global datasets - earthquakes, volcanoes, seafloor age, topography, and gravity - and then sharing their expertise to build connections between the different datasets. Working together with real data, the students are able to determine characteristics of different types of plate boundaries. By working directly with real data, they develop a realistic and long-lasting conception of plate boundaries and the processes that occur along them.

Exploring undergraduate research part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Activities
Students attend a poster session where undergraduates are presenting their research. They are required to talk to four students; they submit the questions they asked and the responses they received, as well as their personal reflections on the nature of research in the Earth sciences.

Courses (4)

Teaching the Geology of the Pacific Northwest part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Course
This course is for Earth science teaching majors, general science teaching majors, and anyone who is interested in both the geology of the Pacific Northwest and how to teach. We explore broad themes in Earth science teaching through specific examples in Pacific Northwest geology; the students' job is to move those ideas into your classroom. Includes a teaching practicum in the local high school.

Research Preparation part of Process of Science:Courses
This is a 1-unit, spring quarter course for undergraduate students who will be embarking on their first research experience over the summer with a faculty member and/or graduate student. The topics the students will be researching are diverse, so the course focuses on the process of research rather than the content. One of the main emphases is on becoming part of the research community.

Research Preparation part of Process of Science:Courses
This is a 1-unit, spring quarter course for undergraduate students who will be embarking on their first research experience over the summer with a faculty member and/or graduate student. The topics the students will be researching are diverse, so the course focuses on the process of research rather than the content. One of the main emphases is on becoming part of the research community.

Dynamic Earth part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Courses
Dynamic Earth is an activity-based introductory course. The course focuses on the fundamentals of earth processes to help students begin to understand the geologic processes that influence the landscape around them, the kinds of ongoing research in the many sub-disciplines of the earth sciences, and the relationships between earth processes and current social issues.

Essay

Using research to teach the methods of geoscience part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Essays
Using Research to Teach the Methods of Geoscience Anne Egger, Geological Sciences and Science Education, Central Washington University For seven years, I taught at a highly selective, research-intensive ...

Other Contribution

Density, Isostasy, and Topography part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activity Supplement Collection
Anne Egger, Central Washington University.This page is a supplement to the original activity description found hereShort description of the activity: In this activity, students develop an explanation for the ...


Events and Communities

The Role of Departments in Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals Participants

Teaching with MARGINS Data and GeoMapApp Participants

Career Prep Workshop 2010 Participants: Leader

2007 AGU Workshop: Strategic Persuasion Participants

Introductory Courses Workshop AGU 2008 Participants: Leader

Introductory Courses 2008 Participants: Leader

Strategies for Successful Recruitment of Geoscience Majors Participants: Presenter

Structure, Geophysics, and Tectonics 2012

ITG Teaching the Methods of Geoscience workshop 2012: PI

ITG Teacher Preparation Module Development Meeting: PI

Getting the Most out of Your Intro Courses 2014: PI

Risk and Resilience Workshop 2014