Teach the Earth > Early Career > Previous Workshops > Workshop 2016 > Program

Early Career Geoscience Faculty Workshop Program

Jump down to: Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Sunday, July 24, 2016

  • Workshop Check-in will take place in Annapolis Hall from 2:00pm-4:30pm, and in the Colony Ballroom at the STAMP Center from 5:00pm-9:00pm. Participant notebooks and name tags will be distributed at check-in.
  • Dorm Check-in is available after 12:00 noon in Annapolis Hall. Linens (pillow, pillowcase, sheets, blanket, 2 towels) will be provided, but toiletries (soap, shampoo, etc) are not; you will need to bring your own. Parking passes and meal cards can be picked up at the time of check-in. If you are not staying on campus, your parking pass will be available at either workshop check-in site. Dorm check-out time is 5:00 pm. You can contact the Service Desk at Annapolis Hall at 301-314-2662 with any questions. Annapolis Hall is open 24 hours a day for check-in. The doors to Annapolis Hall are frequently locked after 7pm. If you go to the door to the right, there will be a button to push and there is a number listed to dial. It rings to the front desk. You can let them know you are there to check in for the geoscience workshop and they will buzz you in.

5:00-5:30 Welcome and Introductions, Colony Ballroom 2203, Stamp Student Union

5:30-6:30 Dinner

6:30-9:00 Strategic Decisions: Elements of a successful career and a satisfying life (Acrobat (PDF) 1.8MB Jul24 16)


Back to top

Monday, July 25

7:00-8:30 Breakfast, South Campus Dining Hall

8:45-9:00 Announcements and Setting Goals, Stamp Student Union, Prince George's Room 1211

9:00-10:40 Course Design (Acrobat (PDF) 4MB Jul24 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Rachel Beane and Kaatje Kraft

10:40-11:00 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

11:00-12:00 Teaching Strategies: Concurrent Sessions I-a, Stamp Student Union

During concurrent sessions I-a and I-b, participants will choose sessions from the lists below:

  • Engaging Students in Large Classes (Acrobat (PDF) 3.8MB Jul25 16), Margaret Brent B 2112 - Andrew Goodliffe and Ben Laabs
  • We will discuss the benefits of using interactive activities in a lecture class, as well as several other ways to engage students, such as student clickers, multimedia clips, in-class demonstrations, course website tools and connecting the topics to students' lives. We will demonstrate some short activities that actively engage a diverse and potentially unmotivated student group and that can easily be incorporated into lecture classes of any size. And we will spend some time brainstorming about ways to incorporate these strategies in your own classroom
  • Interdisciplinary and Team Taught Courses (Acrobat (PDF) 4.3MB Jul25 16), Margaret Brent A 2112 - Josh Galster and Laura Rademacher
  • Geosciences research is becoming increasingly interdisciplinary. In this session, we will explore various ways to model and practice interdisciplinarity in the classroom, from initiating conversations with colleagues about overlapping interests to fully integrated and team taught courses. We will discuss challenges and solutions, both intellectual and logistical and explore successful practices.

    Interdisciplinary teaching: Designing for success - from InTeGrate

    Interdisciplinary teaching and research - from Building Strong Geoscience Departments

  • Teaching Self Regulation for Improved Learning (Acrobat (PDF) 1.2MB Jul25 16), Thurgood Marshall 2113 - Kaatje Kraft
  • Students often struggle with knowing how to best approach studying at topic or complain that they know something until it comes time for the exam. How can we teach students how to develop a better sense of their own comprehension? How can we ultimately get our students to become self-directed learners? This session will explore what the research says about how to support students ability to self-regulate and provide strategies for implementing these practices in the classroom.

  • Student Writing and Learning, Prince George's Room 1211 - Scott Wible
  • The Director of Professional Writing at the University of Maryland will share strategies for designing and evaluating student writing assignments to support learning. Strategies include small-scale, low-stakes writing activities that can be readily incorporated into courses, and longer assignments that support learning objectives within the sciences.

    Strong Writing Assignments module from Pedagogies in Action
    Quantitative Writing module from Pedagogies in Action
    Professional Communication Projects module from Pedagogies in Action
    Exemplary collection of writing assignments - from On the Cutting Edge

12:00-1:15 Lunch (many options in Stamp Student Union; also options near UMD)

1:15-2:15 Teaching Strategies: Concurrent Sessions I-b, Stamp Student Union

  • Engaging Students in Large Classes (Acrobat (PDF) 3.8MB Jul25 16), Margaret Brent B 2112 -Ben Laabs
  • We will discuss the benefits of using interactive activities in a lecture class, as well as several other ways to engage students, such as student clickers, multimedia clips, in-class demonstrations, course website tools and connecting the topics to students' lives. We will demonstrate some short activities that actively engage a diverse and potentially unmotivated student group and that can easily be incorporated into lecture classes of any size. And we will spend some time brainstorming about ways to incorporate these strategies in your own classroom.
  • Teaching Self Regulation for Improved Learning (Acrobat (PDF) 1.2MB Jul25 16), Thurgood Marshall 2113 - Kaatje Kraft
  • Students often struggle with knowing how to best approach studying at topic or complain that they know something until it comes time for the exam. How can we teach students how to develop a better sense of their own comprehension? How can we ultimately get our students to become self-directed learners? This session will explore what the research says about how to support students ability to self-regulate and provide strategies for implementing these practices in the classroom.

  • Teaching with Technology, Prince George's Room 1211 - Andy Goodliffe and Tessa Hill
  • Our students are increasingly using technology to interact outside the classroom, why not take advantage of technological tools to increase student participation and learning in the classroom? In this session we discuss some ways to use technology in the classroom to involve students in learning more actively.

    Teaching with Technology worksheet (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 87kB Jul25 16)

  • SERC Resources for Teaching, Margaret Brent A 2112- Monica Bruckner
  • The Science Education Resource Center (SERC) website has a vast array of resources to support geoscience teaching (and more). In fact, it's so vast that it can be a bit daunting: more than 22,000 pages of content includes community contributions of more than 4,700 teaching activities. We'll start with a brief guided tour of the website to provide an overview, and will use the remaining time to explore the website to locate resources of interest to participants in this session.

2:25-3:45 Lesson Design: Preparing for a class period (Acrobat (PDF) 1.6MB Jul25 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Rachel Beane, Josh Galster and Cynthia Hall

3:45-4:45 Teaching Fair with refreshments, Margaret Brent Room 2112

4:45-5:00 Overview of Individual Consultations, Daily Roadcheck, Margaret Brent Room 2112

Dinner on your own (options near UMD))

7:30-8:30 Sharing Ideas about Specific Courses (optional)

Back to top

Tuesday, July 26

7:00-8:30 Breakfast, South Campus Dining Hall

8:45-9:00 Report From Yesterday's Roadchecks; Introduction to Your Research/Scholarly Career, Stamp Student Union, Prince George's Room 1211

9:00-10:00 Working Effectively with Students Doing Research: Different Models (Acrobat (PDF) 1.7MB Jul26 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Tessa Hill and Josh Galster

10:00-10:20 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

10:20-11:20 Strategies for Research and Scholarship: Concurrent Sessions II-a, Stamp Student Union

During concurrent sessions II-a and II-b, participants will choose sessions from the lists below:

  • Research with Undergraduates (Acrobat (PDF) 5.9MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent Room A 2112 - Cynthia Hall and Laura Rademacher
  • In this session, we explore various models for designing undergraduate projects, working with undergraduates, and preserving group data/knowledge in the face of relatively high student turnover; we also discuss strategies for "chunking" projects in portions suitable for undergraduates at various levels of experience.
  • Starting New Research Projects and Building Collaborations (Acrobat (PDF) 1MB Jul26 16), Thurgood Marshall 2113 - Ben Laabs and Sarah Penniston-Dorland
  • You have finished your dissertation or post-doctoral projects and you want to use the resources at your current institution and establish links outside your current institution to grow in new directions. This session will explore ways that you can build upon your existing strengths to move your career forward.

11:30-12:30 Strategies for Research and Scholarship: Concurrent Sessions II-b, Stamp Student Union

  • Research with Undergraduates (Acrobat (PDF) 5.9MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent Room A 2112 - Cynthia Hall and Laura Rademacher
  • In this session, we explore various models for designing undergraduate projects, working with undergraduates, and preserving group data/knowledge in the face of relatively high student turnover; we also discuss strategies for "chunking" projects in portions suitable for undergraduates at various levels of experience.
  • Setting the Scope for M.S. Research Projects (Acrobat (PDF) 3.4MB Jul26 16), Prince George's Room 1211 -Josh Galster
  • Working with M.S. students - taking the needs of your research program and the needs, experience, and abilities of your students into account and considering what is doable in a reasonable time frame.
  • Starting New Research Projects and Building Collaborations (Acrobat (PDF) 1MB Jul26 16), Thurgood Marshall 2113 - Ben Laabs and Sarah Penniston-Dorland
  • You have finished your dissertation or post-doctoral projects and you want to use the resources at your current institution and establish links outside your current institution to grow in new directions. This session will explore ways that you can build upon your existing strengths to move your career forward.

12:30-2:00 Lunch with Optional Interest Group Discussions, Prince George's Room 1211

Optional Interest Group Discussions:

2:00-3:00 Connections, Extensions, Opportunities: Concurrent Sessions III-a, Stamp Student Union

During concurrent sessions III-a and III-b, participants will choose sessions from the lists below:

  • Bringing Data/Research into the Classroom (Acrobat (PDF) 5.7MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent A 2112 - Josh Galster and Laura Rademacher
  • This session will focus on approaches to provide students valuable research experience within the context of a formal class, for both introductory and upper-division levels. We will discuss advantages for incorporating research, successful strategies for doing so, and examples of research projects in a variety of classes at all levels.

Many students, especially first generation students and those from underrepresented populations in the geosciences, come to university unprepared. Focused mentoring programs which emphasize skills such as communication, writing, presentation skills, and the soft skills necessary to get a job, have been shown to dramatically increase retention and student success. Although this session will focus on graduate students, most aspects are equally applicable to undergraduate students.

  • Managing Service Expectations (Acrobat (PDF) 1.4MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent B 2112 - Sarah Penniston-Dorland and Cynthia Hall
  • Many new faculty members are concerned service will detract them from their scholarship. However, smart service choices can be incredibly advantageous. In this session, we will explore the various types of service in which faculty engage, as well as successful strategies for managing expectations, meeting obligations, and ensuring your service works for you.

3:00-3:20 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

3:20-4:20 Connections, Extensions, Opportunities: Concurrent Sessions III-b, Stamp Student Union

  • Time Management (Acrobat (PDF) 1.9MB Jul26 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Tessa Hill and Ben Laabs
  • We are all faced with competing demands for our attention. This session will discuss some possible and proven ways to deal with these demands in a rational and mindful fashion.
  • Bringing Data/Research into the Classroom (Acrobat (PDF) 5.7MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent A 2112 - Josh Galster and Laura Rademacher
  • This session will focus on approaches to provide students valuable research experience within the context of a formal class, for both introductory and upper-division levels. We will discuss advantages for incorporating research, successful strategies for doing so, and examples of research projects in a variety of classes at all levels.
  • Managing Service Expectations (Acrobat (PDF) 1.4MB Jul26 16), Margaret Brent B 2112 - Sarah Penniston-Dorland and Cynthia Hall
  • Many new faculty members are concerned service will detract them from their scholarship. However, smart service choices can be incredibly advantageous. In this session, we will explore the various types of service in which faculty engage, as well as successful strategies for managing expectations, meeting obligations, and ensuring your service works for you.

4:20-4:30 Daily Roadcheck, Prince George's Room 1211

4:30-7:00 optional Individual consultations

7:00-8:00 Catered Dinner, Prince George's Room

Back to top

Wednesday, July 27

7:00-8:30 Breakfast, South Campus Dining Hall

8:45-9:00 Report From Yesterday's Roadchecks and Preview of Today's Sessions, Prince George's Room 1211

9:00-10:25 Creating a Strategic Plan for Research/Scholarly Activity (Acrobat (PDF) 214kB Jul26 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Rachel Beane and Andrew Goodliffe

10:25-10:45 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

10:45-12:00 Writing Proposals and Getting Funded: Concurrent Sessions IV, Stamp Student Union

Please attend one session from the list below:

12:00-1:30 Lunch with Optional Interest Group Discussions, Prince George's Room 1211

1:30-3:50 Moving Your Research and Teaching Forward: Concurrent Sessions V, Stamp Student Union

Participants will attend one session from the list below:

3:50-4:10 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

4:10-4:30 Poster Instructions (Acrobat (PDF) 42kB Jul27 16), Prince George's Room 1211 (see some examples)

4:30-4:45 Discussion of NSF visit, Prince George's Room 1211 - Tessa Hill

4:45-6:45 Roadcheck, Work on Posters, Individual Consultations, Prince George's Room 1211

Back to top

Thursday, July 28

7:00-8:30 Breakfast, South Campus Dining Hall

8:45-11:40 Poster Session, Stamp Student Union, Prince George's Room 1211

11:40-12:00 Poster Follow-up and Reflection, Prince George's Room 1211

12:00-1:45 Lunch (many options in Stamp Student Union)

1:45-2:45 Building a Network of Support (Acrobat (PDF) 1.2MB Jul28 16), Prince George's Room 1211 - Tessa Hill and Sarah Penniston-Dorland

2:50-4:50 Strategic Action Planning, Prince George's Room 1211

4:50-5:10 Break, Prince George's Room 1211

5:10-6:00 Lessons Learned (notes in Participant Workspace - opens in a new window), Concluding Remarks, and Workshop Evaluation, Prince George's Room 1211 - Rachel Beane

7:00-8:00 Closing Dinner, Prince George's Room

Back to top

Friday, July 29

Optional Visit to the National Science Foundation