Workshop Program

Please plan to arrive in Northfield in time for the 5:00 pm start time on Sunday, October 14, 2018, and depart the airport after 4:30 pm on Tuesday, October 16.

Sunday, October 14

Afternoon: Participants arrive and check into hotel (Country Inn & Suites)

All workshop activities take place in the Great Hall of Severance Hall, unless otherwise noted below. Follow these directions to Severance Hall.

8:30 - 4:00 Teaching Activity Review Camp (review participants only)

Review Camp Workspace (limited access)

5:00 – 6:00 Welcoming remarks and icebreaker activity - Cathryn Manduca, SERC

6:00 – 7:10 Dinner

7:10 – 7:30 Introduction and goals of the workshop (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 13.2MB Oct14 18) - Lisa Kempler, MathWorks

7:30 – 8:30 Keynote: Scalable integration of scientific computing and data science in flipped, open-source classrooms (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 353.3MB Oct14 18) - Nathan Kutz, University of Washington, introduced by Lisa Kempler, MathWorks

8:30 Further interaction and socialization

Don't forget: Make sure you have a SERC account. A SERC account will allow you to access and edit the private participant workspace. Take a minute to add your contact info to the participant information page (private to workshop participants). This will be an easy way for you to test your access to the workspace in addition to giving all of us a way to share all of our contact info. We recommend reading these brief instructions on how to edit the workspace.

Monday, October 15

Breakfast at hotel (Country Inn & Suites) or in town

8:30 – 8:45 Introduction and goals for the day (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 935kB Oct15 18) - Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University

8:45 – 9:45 Table Discussions: Cross-disciplinary learning outcomes followed by whole group discussion and synthesis - moderated by Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University

What are the overarching computational learning goals in your courses? What computational learning goals are shared across disciplines? In this session, participants will discuss these and other questions with colleagues from other STEM fields.

Table discussion session reporting pages

9:45 – 10:00 Break

10:00 – 11:30 Disciplinary Working Groups: Teaching computation in your discipline (review/discuss examples, synthesize strategies, identify challenges) - facilitated by Kelly Roos, Bradley University

How do you teach computation in your discipline? What techniques or strategies do you use? What challenges do instructors in your discipline face when teaching computation or MATLAB? In this session, participants will discuss these questions and more with other colleagues in the same or similar teaching field.

Disciplinary working groups session reporting pages

Working Groups:

  • Biology and Health Sciences (Sayles Hill 250) - Leader: Michael Wright, California State University-Sacramento, Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry (Sayles Hill 252) - Leader: Brittnee Veldman, CSU Channel Islands, Chemistry
  • Earth and Ocean Sciences (Sayles Hill 253) - Leader: Diane Fribance, Coastal Carolina University, Marine Science
  • Engineering (Sayles Hill 254) - Leader: Matthew Zelisko, University of Houston, Engineering
  • Math and Computer Science (Sayles Hill Lounge) - Leaders: Morgan Fonley, Alma College, Mathematics and Computer Science and Joan Weiss, Fairfield University, Mathematics
  • Physics (Severance Hall Great Hall) - Leader: Heather Whitney, Wheaton College, Physics

11:30 – 11:45 Working group reports - facilitated by Kelly Roos, Bradley University

Disciplinary working groups will report on the key points of their discussion. 1 - 2 minutes per report.

Disciplinary working groups session reporting pages

11:45 – 1:00 Lunch - Carleton College, Language and Dining Center

1:00 – 2:00 Panel Discussion: Assessing computational thinking - moderated by Dan Burleson, University of Houston

In this session, panelists will discuss how they assess computational thinking. Each panelist will spend a few minutes highlighting a teaching activity of their choice and describe how they assess student learning in that context. The brief presentations will be followed by a question and answer period.

Panelists:

  • Andy Ridgwell, University of California-Riverside, Earth Sciences
  • Benjamin Bratton, Princeton University, Molecular Biology
  • Kristi Closser, California State University-Fresno, Chemistry
  • Eugene Mahmoud, Mt. San Antonio College, Physics and Engineering
  • Michelle Isenhour, Naval Postgraduate School, Operations Research

2:00 – 3:00 Cross-disciplinary working groups: Techniques and strategies for assessing computational learning (review/discuss examples, synthesize strategies, identify challenges)

In this session, participants will share examples of how they assess computational learning with colleagues in other disciplines. Groups will discuss specific techniques and strategies and also identify assessment challenges that transcend the disciplines.

Cross-disciplinary working groups session reporting pages

Working Groups:

  • Group 1 (Sayles Hill 250) - Leader: Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University, Geosciences
  • Group 2 (Sayles Hill 252) - Leader: Thomas Kelley, Northeastern University, Physics
  • Group 3 (Sayles Hill 253) - Leader: Andrew Fischer, University of Tasmania, Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies
  • Group 4 (Sayles Hill 254) - Leader: Rebecca Edwards, Southwestern University, Physics
  • Group 5 (Sayles Hill Lounge) - Leader: Sandra Fital-Akelbek, Weber State University, Mathematics
  • Group 6 (Severance Hall Great Hall) - Leader: Julie Fogarty, California State University-Sacramento, Civil Engineering
  • Group 7 (Severance Hall Great Hall) - Leader: Ali Tabei, University of Northern Iowa, Physics
  • Group 8 (Severance Hall Great Hall) - Leader: Jean-Pierre Bayard, California State University - Office of the Chancellor, Academic Technology Services

3:00 – 3:15 Break

3:15 – 3:30 Whole group discussion on what we learned about assessment - facilitated by Dan Burleson, University of Houston

A short synthesis of sessions on assessing computational learning.

3:30 – 4:30 MATLAB: A Computing Playground for Students (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 18MB Oct15 18) - Paul Kassebaum, MathWorks

4:30 – 5:30 Table discussions: Addressing interests and challenges in teaching and learning MATLAB

In this open session, participants will have an opportunity to discuss hot topics, ideas, and challenges related to teaching and learning MATLAB. This is an opportunity for participants to discuss areas where they have:

  • A difficulty doing something with MATLAB in their courses that they are trying to resolve
  • An idea for doing something with MATLAB, and they want to figure out how
Table discussion session reporting pages

5:30 – 6:00 Where are we? Group reflection and roadcheck - facilitated by Princess Imoukhuede, Washington University in St. Louis

Please take a few minutes to complete the workshop roadcheck.

6:30 Dinner - self-organized groups at a selection of restaurants in town (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 103kB Oct13 17)

Tuesday, October 16

Breakfast at hotel (Country Inn & Suites) or in town

8:30 – 8:40 Roadcheck summary and overview of the day - Lisa Kempler, MathWorks and Mitchell Awalt, SERC

8:40 – 9:30 Teaching Activity Best Practices - Dan Burleson, University of Houston

Following the plenary participants will discuss observations from the review process and share strengths from selected contributed activities. Participants are encouraged to reflect on their own activities and consider actionable changes.


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Session reporting notes

9:30 - 9:50 – Short break and preparation for the final working session

During the break, consider the following questions and identify a learning goal you are interested in working on. For reference, you consider the strategies and approaches discussed last year. Put it on a sticky note on the board. These will help determine the working groups for our next session.

  • What computational learning goal(s) would you like to work on in the next hour?
  • How would you assess whether or not students have met these learning goals?
  • What is a teaching strategy you could use that aligns with your learning goals and assessment?

9:50 – 11:00 Cross-disciplinary working groups: Developing strong instruction strategies and examples
- facilitated by Princess Imoukhuede, Washington University in St. Louis

Participants will work to conceptualize strategies and tactics for teaching computational skills in their courses that map to the learning objectives and assessments developed earlier in the workshop. Organized based on topics of interest coming out of the morning plenary and table discussions. You care encouraged to use the Teaching Computation in the Science Using MATLAB website to guide and inform your discussion.

Cross-disciplinary working groups session reporting pages

11:00 - 11:45 Working group reports and reflection - facilitated by Princess Imoukhuede, Washington University in St. Louis

11:45 – 1:00 Lunch - Carleton College, Language and Dining Center

1:00 – 2:00 Workshop synthesis: Identifying remaining challenges, synthesis and future work, end of workshop evaluation - Dylan Mikesell, Boise State University

Travel Stipend Reimbursement Information

2:00 – 4:00 (Optional) Troubleshooting: personal time with MATLAB experts until you have to go

Make the most of your time at the workshop! Spend the final hours until your departure talking and working with colleagues.

2:00 – 4:00 Shuttles to airport