Cutting Edge > Courses > Oceanography > Workshop 2013 > Program

Workshop Program

Stromatolites
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Stromatolites -- Hamelin Pool, Sharks Bay, Western Australia[creative commons]
Provenance: Katryn Wiese, City College of San Francisco
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Monday June 17 - Optional Field Trip

8 am -8 pm Optional Field Trip - Pacific Coast South of San Francisco & South San Francisco Bay- includes South Bay Cruise – Dinner on return (on own dime) (Click here for details, maps, and images.)

6:30 pm Optional dinner gathering in downtown San Francisco for those who've arrived early (on your own dime) - gather in front of 808 Kearny at 6:30 pm. Group will head toward Belden Place (parallel to Kearny between Pine and Bush) or into North Beach.

Tuesday, June 18

Theme: WHAT do we teach in Oceanography?

Morning

8:15-8:30 am Welcome and Logistics + Action Plan Instructions - Main Conference Room (402)

(tea and coffee provided)

8:30-9 am Introductions and Ice Breaker - Main Conference Room (402)

9-10:15 am Round Table Discussions: Opportunities and Challenges in Teaching Oceanography & Activity Review - Main Conference Room (402) - Review of efforts completed prior to workshop - What's on your mind? Discussions about survey results and pre-workshop activity review

10:15-10:30 am Break (light snack provided) (402)

10:30-11:45 am Invited Plenary Talk - Sustainable Oceans and Educating Future Citizens - Dr. Sylvia Earle - Main Conference Room (402)

11:45 am -12 pm Reflection/Action Plan

12-1 pm Catered lunch - Main Conference Room (402)

Afternoon

1-1:45 pm Teaching Oceanography - Case Studies - 4 concurrent sessions - 14th floor classrooms - FORMAT: 20-30 minutes of presentation, 15-25 minutes of Q&A and interactive: how to incorporate into your class

Session Choices document (Acrobat (PDF) 123kB Jun11 13) (you should also have a copy in your workshop folder)

1:45-2 pm Reflection/Action Plan

2-2:45 pm Bringing Oceanography into the Classroom - 4 concurrent sessions - 14th floor classrooms - FORMAT: 20-30 minutes of presentation, 15-25 minutes of Q&A and interactive: how to incorporate into your class

2:45-3 pm Reflection/Action Plan

3-3:15 pm Break (light snack provided) (402)

3:15-4:15 pm Sustainability; Stewardship; Ocean Resources, International Policy - Katie Farnsworth, Dave Mogk, Alex Turra - Main Conference Room (402)

Workspace pages for the sustainability/stewardship/resources/policy session

4:15-4:30 pm Reflection/Action Plan

4:30-5:30 pm Student Learning Outcomes, Assessment, and Course Design (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 399kB Jun18 13) - Steven Taylor, Elizabeth Gordon, Katryn Wiese - Main Conference Room (402)

Workspace pages for the student learning outcomes/assessment/course design session

5:30-6 pm Reflection and Daily Road Check - Main Conference Room (402)

6:30 pm Dinner at Gaylord's Indian Restaurant (8-minute walk)

Wednesday, June 19

Theme: HOW Do We Teach Oceanography? Strategies and Best Practices

Lava into Sea
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Lava entering the Sea -- Kalapana -- Hawaii[creative commons]
Provenance: Katryn Wiese, City College of San Francisco
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Morning

8:15-8:30 am Logistics - Main Conference Room (402)
(tea and coffee provided)

8:30-10 am Active Learning (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 40.1MB Jun19 13) - Al Trujillo - Main Conference Room (402)

10-10:15 am Reflection/Action Plan

10:15-10:30 am Break (402) (light snack provided)

10:30 am -12:15 pm Go to Class 1: Be a student participating in a 2-hour lab - 4 concurrent sessions - 14th floor classrooms
Session Choices document (Acrobat (PDF) 123kB Jun11 13) (you should also have a copy in your workshop folder)

  • OOI Lab Builder: Ocean Acidification and Hurricanes - Janice McDonnell & Scott Glenn - 1401
    Explore the Lesson Lab Builder (LLB), a tool developed for undergraduate professors to design laboratories and problem-based activities using archived and real time data. Two prototype lessons including topics such as ocean acidification and hurricanes will be demonstrated using the LLB software. The LLB is part of a suite of undergraduate focused learning tools being developed by the NSF-funded Ocean Observing Initiative Education and Public Engagement (OOI EPE) group.
  • Anomalous behavior in the equatorial Pacific - Becca Walker - 1405
    Use Pacific SST, wind, and precipitation data from 1999-2011 to characterize the positive, negative, and neutral phases of ENSO. Then consider ENSO's influence on coastal upwelling and natural hazards. (This lab is an example of a module in production as part of the InTeGraTe curriculum development project.)
  • Isostasy: From a floating idea to dynamic understanding (PowerPoint 1.4MB Jun19 13) - Stephen Schellenberg - 1402
    Scaffold from the concept of density to Archimedes' Principle to dynamic isostasy to develop a process-based understanding of regional to global bathymetric and topographic patterns.
  • Density-driven circulation - Elizabeth Gordon - 1404
    Develop a hypothesis about what is likely to happen to thermohaline circulation as Arctic ice continues to melt, and design your own experiment using simple materials to test your hypothesis. Communicate findings in a report, which describes methods in a way that someone else could follow, and makes connections between this simple lab experiment and the 'big picture' of density-driven circulation. This is a lab that is aligned with the general education 'problem solving' objective and is evaluated by a rubric.

12:15-12:30 pm Reflection/Action Plan

12:30-1:30 pm Catered lunch (402) + Share Fair set up (14th floor)

Afternoon

1:30-2:30 pm Go to Class 2: Be a student participating in an interactive lecture/discussion section (3 short interactive classroom activities) - 4 concurrent sessions - 14th floor classrooms

Session: Biological Oceanography - 1401

  • The Great Clade Race (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 5.8MB Jun19 13) - Susan Richardson
    Reconstruct an imaginary racecourse from a set of eight file cards with stamps on them. The correct map is discussed in the context of phylogenetic trees and their terminology. Activity comes from Goldsmith, 2003 can be used in discussions of evolution and/or marine biodiversity.
  • Critter Du Jour (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 6.8MB Jun14 13) - Cynthia Venn
    Examine one component of an organism to solve its mystery and answer questions such as: What kind of organisms is this? What is this component used for?
  • Invertebrate model - Alex Turra
    Build a model to represent anything related to invertebrate morphology, functioning and/or behavior (using basic and cheap materials). Models should be self-explanatory, biologically correct, and able to be manipulated.
Session: Seawater - 1402

  • Hydrogen Bonding - Elizabeth Nagy-Shadman
    Compare and contrast the behavior of droplets of water and oil l to understand polarity and hydrogen bonding.
  • What is in the Water? (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 578kB Jun19 13) - Bob Chen
    Investigate, like ocean scientists, what is in seawater, e.g. every element in the periodic table, 1000s of molecules including caffeine, ibuprofen, and DDT, and carbon sequestered by intertidal wetlands. This simple activity allows students to explore their own water sample while learning key concepts about water, scientific observation, and the practice of science.
  • Make it melt faster! (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 513kB Jun14 13) - Mirjam Glessmer
    Explore how melting of ice cubes floating in water is influenced by the salinity of the water. Important oceanographic concepts like density and density driven currents are visualized and can be discussed on the basis of this experiment.
Session: Seafloor Mapping & more - 1404
  • Google Earth - Oceans - Beth Dushman
    Explore the basics of using Google Earth-based activities in lecture or lab. We will cover the basics of creating placemarks and .kmz files and explore some of the useful layers and datasets available for Google Earth. Examples will include shoreline changes due to longshore transport, geological features from the South Texas Coast, bathymetry and volcanoes at mid-ocean ridges and subduction zones, and earthquakes at plate boundaries. (participants will find this most useful if they have laptops with Google Earth installed)
  • Paper Plates: Make Your Own Spreading Center - Katherine Shaw
    Build a small, cheap, model of seafloor spreading and use it to determine why important changes in oceanic lithosphere are correlated with distance from the mid-ocean ridge.
  • Is that True? (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 3.1MB Jun19 13) - Steven Hovan
    Ask students to research the "truth" behind statements from recent news articles and provide their opinion about what is "true". Examples include statements about hurricane intensity increases due to global warming, Coriolis effect and southern hemisphere, etc.
Session: Atmosphere & Currents - 1405

  • Atmospheric Pressure and Surface Wind Patterns - Jacqueline Boucher - Consider solar insolation, air composition, and air density to deduce the pattern of atmospheric circulation on a water-covered, non-rotating planet surrounded by suns.
  • Summary of ocean gyre circulation and implications for global primary productivity - Megan Jones
    Demonstrate understanding of surface circulation in ocean gyres and how it is related to broad patterns of global primary productivity by completing a schematic sea surface map and sea surface profile of the Atlantic Ocean. This simple visual framework allows students to see any misconceptions they have about the relationship/connection between surface circulation and primary productivity and to correct them.
  • Mapping Paleocurrents: Using the Past to Understand the Present (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 7.1MB Jun14 13) - Laurie Grigg
    Working back from the present, reconstruct the location of past surface currents based on the location of the continents and global atmospheric circulation patterns. Also consider the importance of oceanic gyres in global heat transport by identifying warm and cold currents, as well as, areas that in the past were isolated from hemisphere-scale gyres and as a result, experienced unusually cold or warm conditions.

2:30-2:45 pm Reflection/Action Plan + Share Fair set up (14th floor)

2:45-3:30 pm Share Fair A: Demonstrations (+/- Poster) of favorite Oceanography teaching activities (1401 + 1402)
Participants whose last names end with A through K: PRESENTERS. Everyone else circulates for informal demonstrations and discussions. Share Fair presentations and activities are linked from the workshop participant list.

3:30-3:45 pm Break (402) (light snack provided)

3:45-4:30 pm Share Fair B: Demonstrations (+/- Poster) of favorite Oceanography teaching activities (1404 + 1405)
Participants whose last names end with L through Z: PRESENTERS. Everyone else circulates for informal demonstrations and discussions. Share Fair presentations and activities are linked from the workshop participant list.

4:30-5 pm Share Fair clean up and Reflection/Action Plan

5-6 pm - Walk to Pier 39 (25 minutes – average walking pace with no distractions)

6-7 pm Aquarium of the Bay on Fisherman's Wharf (Pier 39)

7-7:30 pm Waterfront and sea Lions exploration

7:30 pm Dinner at Fog Harbor Restaurant (Pier 39)

9 pm Return walk to hotels

Thursday, June 20

Theme: The Future - What more can we do?

Morning

8:15-8:30 am Logistics - Main Conference Room (402) (tea and coffee provided)

8:30-9:00 am Career Resources for Students & Networking (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 11.6MB Jun14 13) - Jan Hodder (with Mirjam Glessmer) - Main Conference Room (402)

9-9:15 am Reflection/Action Plan

9:15-10:30 am Online Teaching & Resources (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 12.5MB Jun20 13) - Al Trujillo (with Monica Bruckner, Don Reed, Stephen Schellenberg, Katryn Wiese) - Main Conference Room (402) - (series of presentations, interactive activities, and Q&A/discussion)

Teaching Online module from On the Cutting Edge - find tips for designing and implementing online courses (along with examples).

Oceanography module from On the Cutting Edge

SERC Site Guides, including:

- Video by Katryn Wiese

10:30-10:45 am Reflection/Action Plan

10:45- 11 am Break (light snack provided)

11-11:30 am Resources for Next Steps - Kristen St. John (with Janice McDonnell, Dave Mogk, and Becca Walker) - Main Conference Room (402) - (series of presentations, interactive activities, and Q&A/discussion) - opportunities through InTeGraTe; follow on activities GSA, AGU; themed publication for JGE; NSF, OOI.

11:30-11:45 am Work Group Brainstorm - Main Conference Room (402)

11:45-12 pm Reflection/Action Plan

12-1 pm Catered lunch

Afternoon

1-3:15pm Working groups - Main Conference Room to start (402), then breakouts to 14th Floor

3:15-3:30 pm Break (402) (light snack provided)

3:30-4:30 pm Town Hall Meeting - Reports from working groups - Main Conference Room (402)

4:30-5 pm Work plans and workshop evaluation

6:00 pm Optional dinner gathering and evening event for those interested (on your own dime) to The Exploratorium After Hours Event (adults-only evening event – open bar – crazy interactive science exhibits – very fun!) - $15 for entry ticket. 2 restaurants on site: Seismic Joint Cafe & the Seaglass Restaurant (15-minute walk)

7:30 pm tour led by on-site expert

Winogradsky columns - from Microbial Life Educational Resources

Friday June 21 - Optional Field Trip

8 am - 6 pm - Optional Field Trip - San Francisco and Marin Headlands - Leaves at 8 am from in front of 808 Kearny - (Click here for details, maps, and images.)


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