Teach the Earth > Career Prep > Previous Workshops > Workshop 2010 > Program

Workshop Program

Note: the 2010 workshop is over. Find out more about the "Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences" workshops, or read on for more information about the 2010 workshop.
Jump down to Friday * Saturday * Sunday

Thursday, July 29, 2010


1:00-6:00 Workshop Registration
Participants check in for dorm assignment and meal card. See travel and logistics page for additional information. Workshop registration is from 1:00-4:30 at Studio 1 (736 Escondido Road) and then from 5:00-9:00 at the workshop opening reception in Branner Dining Hall. Please check in for the workshop and get your name badge and workshop notebook when you arrive.

Optional Pre-Workshop Events on Thursday Afternoon


2:30-3:30 Concurrent Sessions

  • The Hydrologic Cycle of the American West during times of high CO2: A View from the Past - Page Chamberlain, Stanford University, Mitchell Building, Room 352 (third floor)

    In this talk I am going to show how data originally collected for "pure" scientific reasons can be reinterpreted and morphed into answering questions that are more "applied" and societally relevant. Here I will use stable isotopic data from paleosols and paleolakes that range from modern to 60 million years ago to address questions on how the hydrologic cycle functioned in the American West during times of high carbon dioxide concentrations. Although climate models can be used to predict how water will be distributed in the future as carbon dioxide increases – they are still models that are subject to vast uncertainties and error. Another, and equally valid, approach to addressing changes in the hydrologic cycle attendant with climate change is to examine ancient records when the Earth was warmer. The underlying theme of this talk is how a scientist can guide their career to address ever moving and evolving scientific questions.

  • Straddling the Divide Between Fundamental and Applied Research: From the San Andreas Fault to Carbon Sequestration - Mark Zoback, Stanford University, Mitchell Building, Hartley Conference Room (first floor)
    The endless debate in academia over fundamental versus applied research is a classic false dichotomy. Students are well-served by a continuum of classes and research opportunities that engage a wide range of fundamental questions that as frequently have, as have not, immediate application to problems of societal needs. In my own case, my training in seismology, rock mechanics and fluid flow has allowed me work on a wide range of both fundamental and applied problems as diverse as achieving a better understanding of the forces that move tectonic plates, scientific drilling into the San Andreas fault and investigation of the feasibility of large scale geologic sequestration of CO2 for the control of greenhouse gas emissions.

3:45-4:45 Concurrent Sessions

  • Families and Careers: A Panel Discussion - Robyn Wright Dunbar, moderator, Mitchell Building, Hartley Conference Room
    Discussion of issues, opportunities, and choices associated with families and careers, including children, dual-career couples, and more, followed by questions from the participants.
  • Tour of Labs and Equipment in the School of Earth Sciences - Jessica Warren, Marty Grove, and Caroline Harris - meet in Mitchell Building lobby (first floor) for start of tour

Workshop Begins


5:00-6:00 Reception and Icebreaker Activity - Branner Dining Hall (enter at back side of building; front doors are locked)

6:00-7:00 Dinner - Branner Dining Hall

7:00-9:00 Introductions and Opening Session - Branner Dining Hall

  • Welcome, Introductions, Workshop Goals and Overview
    Heather Macdonald and Robyn Wright Dunbar
  • Where Do You Want to Go? - A Spectrum of Academic Careers: Panel and Discussion
    Workshop leaders from different types of colleges and universities
    Each panelist will give a short overview of his or her current job. Following the presentations, you will have an opportunity to ask questions. The goal is for participants to learn more about the diversity of job opportunities available in academia.
    Our academic career profiles page has links to profiles of many academic geoscientists, including most of the 2010 Career Prep workshop leaders. We also have a collection of profiles of geoscientists in geoscience education, outreach, and public affairs.


Friday, July 30, 2010


7:00-8:00 Breakfast - Stern Dining Hall

8:15-8:35 Overview of Day and Preparing Now For Your Future Academic Career in the Geosciences (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 1.3MB Jul26 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
Heather Macdonald

Theme for the day: Who are you as a teacher?

8:40-9:40 Research on Learning: Concurrent Sessions

9:40-10:00 Break

10:00-10:50 Teaching Breakout Sessions I

  • Classroom Management (Acrobat (PDF) 81kB Jul19 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room McDowell
    Katryn Wiese
    Moving a class towards a shared goal can often come with obstacles that challenge the best of us. In this session, we will review strategies for dealing with common problems of the classroom, including handling emotional students, motivating poor performers, and helping students achieve their best performances.
  • Designing Effective Science Courses (PowerPoint 722kB Jul19 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
    Robyn Wright Dunbar
    Apply what we know about science learning to design effective courses. This session hits the highlights setting instructional objectives, determining course format, and assessment.
  • Incorporating Data Analysis into Undergraduate Courses (PowerPoint 3.5MB Jul30 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room
    Rachel O'Brien and Jeff Marshall
    This session will provide examples to illustrate how you can incorporate local and/or global datasets into courses, thereby allowing undergraduate students opportunities to analyze and interpret real data. We will highlight case-studies that range in scope from short, in-class activities to multi-week course projects and discuss how to use archives as well as real-time datasets. Participants will examine a variety of data sources and begin identifying key concepts and/or course activities that would benefit from this practice.

11:00-11:50 Teaching Breakout Sessions II

12:00-1:00 Lunch and Optional Lunch-time Birds of a Feather Discussions (12:15-1:15) - Stern Dining Hall

Possible topics might include: Children and Careers, Non-Faculty Academic Positions, Being a Good Departmental Citizen, and Evaluation of Student Learning.

1:30-3:15 Designing Effective Classroom/Laboratory Activities - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
Heather Macdonald and other workshop leaders

For this activity, you will work in small groups to develop a classroom or lab activity that addresses a key concept or skill in your discipline. This session will be an opportunity to share ideas with other participants as you consider different ways to teach that concept or skill.

View posters of the teaching activity ideas
  • Daily Class Planning links to resources to help you develop your own classroom, lab, or field activities, or to find existing activities that meet your needs.
  • How to Plan a Single Class Period provides guidance in planning a lesson, from setting learning goals for the day to assessing whether students have met those goals. This page includes specific geoscience examples and a worksheet you can use to plan a class period.

3:15-3:45 Break

3:45-5:00 Teaching Statements Concurrent Sessions: Articulating Your Teaching Goals and Highlighting Your Accomplishments

  • Your Teaching Statement is a list of resources describing how to write your own personal teaching statement. At the top of the list is a worksheet to help you through the process.
  • Introduction to Teaching Statements - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room
    Robyn Wright Dunbar
    This session is designed to "jump start" the writing process for those who have yet to draft a teaching statement. Participants will articulate their teaching goals and accomplishments and begin the process of folding these into a concise teaching statement.
  • Review of Teaching Statements - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
    Heather Macdonald and other workshop leaders
    Participants who bring five copies of their teaching statements will work in small groups, each with a workshop leader, reviewing each other's statements and offering feedback. Leaders will also offer their comments.

5:00-5:20 Reflection time and Daily "Road Check" - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL

6:00-7:00 Dinner - Stern Dining

7:30-8:30 Optional Evening Discussions:

  • Early Career Time Management - Robyn Dunbar
  • Writing Your First Research Grant - Rachel O'Brien
  • Short reviews (10 minutes) of curriculum vitae and/or cover letter for job application - Oswaldo Garcia and Heather Macdonald


Saturday, July 31, 2010


7:00-8:00 Breakfast - Stern Dining Hall

Theme for the morning: Who are you as a researcher?

8:15-8:25 Overview of Day and Report on Daily Feedback - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL

8:25-9:20 Presenting Yourself to Others (PowerPoint 850kB Jul27 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
Heather Macdonald and Francisca Oboh-Ikuenobe

In the job search process you will have very brief, yet critical, opportunities to convey your work to others. Participants in this session will refine a personal "Elevator Talk," a paragraph that describes the nature and significance of your research and is aimed at an audience of other geoscientists. You will then practice talking about your work to others.

9:20-9:40 Beating the impostor syndrome: Why we all feel like fakes, and why it does not matter (Acrobat (PDF) 470kB Jul31 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
Margot Gerritsen

  • Additional data (Acrobat (PDF) 587kB Jul26 10) from Margot
  • Mindset: a book by psychologist Carol Dweck about research on achievement and success

9:40-10:00 Break

10:00-11:00 Moving Your Research Forward to New Settings: Breakout Sessions - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL

11:10-12:10 Research Statements: Concurrent Sessions

  • Introduction to Research Statements (PowerPoint 203kB Jul26 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room
    Heather Macdonald
    This session is designed to "jump start" the writing process for those who have yet to draft a research statement and will include discussion of key aspects of research statements intended for a particular type of institution (e.g., liberal arts college, research university).
  • Review of Research Statements - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Room LLL
    Robyn Wright Dunbar and other workshop leaders
    Participants who submitted research statements in advance will review each other's research statements and will discuss key aspects of research statements intended for a particular type of institution (e.g., liberal arts college, research university).

12:10-1:00 Lunch and Optional Lunch-time Birds of a Feather Discussions (12:15-1:15) - Stern Dining Hall

Possible topics might include follow-up to the beating the impostor syndrome session, being an international scientist in the US, a question and answer (Q&A) potpourri, community college interviews, post-doc life, two-body "opportunity," getting a job overseas, and other topics suggested by participants or leaders

Theme for the afternoon: Choosing Where You Want to Go and Getting There

1:30-2:50 Mapping Your Career: Choices, Balance, and Action Planning - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room
Heather Macdonald and all workshop leaders

Given where you are in your career and what you have learned at this workshop, reflect on your long term goals or "dream job." What are your next steps? What advice would help you most at this point?

2:50-3:10 Break

3:10-4:30 The Academic Job Search: Applications, Interviews, Teaching Demonstrations, and Job Talks (PowerPoint 215kB Jul26 10) - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room
Heather Macdonald and all workshop leaders

How to tailor your application for each advertised position, what to expect during your interview, and how to prepare an effective "job talk" (research presentation and/or teaching demonstration). Brief presentations will be followed by a question and answer period and some mock interview questioning.
  • The Job Search is a collection of resources for people looking for jobs in academia. It includes information on beginning your search, assembling your application materials, interviewing, negotiating, and dealing with additional considerations (such as being part of a dual career couple).
  • The job talk, (PowerPoint 30kB Aug2 06) from Ann Bykerk-Kauffman, summarizes a few key points about how to give an effective presentation during an on-campus interview.

4:30-5:00 Negotiating Before You Accept an Academic Position: Setting Yourself Up for Success - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room

5:00-5:30 Reflection, Next Steps, and Workshop Evaluation - Arrillaga Alumni Center, Fisher Conference Center, Barnes Room

6:30 Reception followed by dinner at 7:00 - Branner Dining Hall. Dinner will be followed by an optional contra dance for those who are interested.


Sunday, August 1, 2010


7:00-8:30 Breakfast - Stern Dining Hall

Optional Workshop Sessions - Mitchell Hall


8:30-9:30 Concurrent Workshops: Session 1

9:30-9:45 Break

9:45-10:45 Concurrent Workshops: Session 2

  • Place-Based Teaching and Learning (Acrobat (PDF) 1.7MB Jul23 10) - Room 352 (third floor)
    Steve Semken
    We teach about Earth systems, processes, and history in real places that hold personal and cultural meanings and diverse kinds of relevance for our students. Their prior senses of place can either help or impede their learning. Participation in this session will explore the use of place as context and theme for relevant, inclusive, and trans-disciplinary place-based teaching; and the leverage of sense of place as motivation for learning.
  • Taking Risks in Research (Acrobat (PDF) 86kB Aug2 10) - Going Outside Your Traditional and Comfortable Areas of Expertise and Thriving - Hartley Conference Center (first floor)
    Margot Gerritsen

10:45-11:00 Break

11:00-12:00 Concurrent Workshops: Session 3

  • Balancing Life and Work and Managing Time (Acrobat (PDF) 123kB Jul19 10) - Hartley Conference Center (first floor)
    Katryn Wiese
    The first step in achieving a good balance in our lives is to clearly set our priorities. Next, we need to be realistic about how much we can do. In this session, we will rank our priorities and use them to help us make choices about what jobs, projects, and activities we want to pursue. We will also review and share strategies for managing time and juggling the tasks that we do choose.
  • Developing Your Students as Writers - Room 370 (third floor)
    Anne Egger
    Writing well is hard (and even harder to teach), but well-written papers can be incredibly powerful in both our teaching and our research. In this session, we'll talk about ways to design courses that develop your students as science writers, including giving and receiving constructive feedback.
  • Science Education: Working with K-12 Teachers (PowerPoint 4.3MB Aug3 10) - Room 352 (third floor)
    Jeff Marshall
    This session will focus on strategies for engaging in the teacher training efforts of your college/university.

If you attended any of today's optional sessions, please give us your feedback via the Sunday session evaluation form. Thanks!


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