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Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences
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Preparing for an Academic Career Bookshelf

bookshelf
This page describes books recommended by leaders and alumni of the Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshops, for graduate students and postdoctoral fellows planning careers in academia. While by no means an exhaustive list, these books come highly recommended. If there's something you'd like to recommend that's not listed here, please suggest a book for our bookshelf.

Tomorrow's Professor: Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering

The first thing to know about this book is that folks not in science and engineering also cite it as a highly valuable career planning resource. Great advice about things you can do now to compete effectively for, and be successful in, that next career step.
Reis, Richard M., 1997, Tomorrow's Professor: Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering, Wiley—IEEE Comp. Society Press, 440 pp.

The Academic Job Search Handbook

From identifying job openings to the challenges new faculty face in their first year of their new job, this handbook covers it all. In particular, the authors offer extensive advice on preparing application materials, interviewing, and negotiating job offers. They include examples of vitae, cover letters, teaching and research statements. They also discuss phone, conference, and campus interviews, and include a list of possible interview questions.
Vick, Julia Miller and Jennifer S. Furlong, 2008, The Academic Job Search Handbook (4th Edition), University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadephia, PA, 296 pp.

Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia

Hearing the call for a follow-up to the wildly successful Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia, Ms. Mentor now broadens her counsel to include academics of the male variety. Ms. Mentor knows all about foraging for jobs, about graduate school stars and serfs, and about mentors and underminers, backbiters and whiners. She answers burning questions: Am I too old, too working class, too perfect, too blonde? When should I reproduce? When do I speak up, laugh, and spill the secrets I've gathered? Do I really have to erase my own blackboard? Does academic sex have to be reptilian?
Toth, Emily, 2008, Ms. Mentor's New and Ever More Impeccable Advice for Women and Men in Academia, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadephia, PA, 272 pp.

Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia

In question-and-answer form, Ms. Mentor advises academic women about issues they daren't discuss openly, such as: How does one really clamber onto the tenure track when the job market is so nasty, brutish, and small? Is there such a thing as the perfectly marketable dissertation topic? How does a meek young woman become a tiger of an authority figure in the classroom-and get stupendous teaching evaluations? How does one cope with sexual harassment, grandiosity, and bizarre behavior from entrenched colleagues?
Toth, Emily, 1997, Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadephia, PA, 240 pp.

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