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Adam Wymore: Introduction to Critical Zone Science at University of New Hampshire-Main Campus
Adam Wymore, University of New Hampshire-Main Campus
This course was taught as an upper-division elective to Environmental Science Majors at the University of New Hampshire. The student body reflected a mix of students specializing in Ecosystem Ecology, Soils, and Hydrology. This diversity, as well as my training as a biologist made for an rich combination of perspectives on Critical Zone Science. At the end of course, students really appreciated the holistic approach to environmental and earth system science.

Subject: Geoscience:Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Martha Conklin: Critical Zone Science at University of California-Merced
Martha Conklin, University of California-Merced
Turning students on to the "critical zone" My course is an upper level multidisciplinary course that uses the critical zone (the zone between bedrock and the tops of trees) to illustrate the synergy between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. This course was taught with short lectures, online readings and group activities both in and out of class. It culminated with a research paper and a 10-min presentation of the research paper. The students were incredibly engaged throughout the class. The class was open to all majors – so there was a fraction of seniors trying to fill in a last course. I was excited about the level of participation. The in-class exercises helped students to become comfortable with the material. We had an optional fieldtrip to the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory and it was right after we had dug a number of soil pits – so the students could see the in situ heterogeneity. I think this class helps students synthesize the interconnectedness of critical zone processes (from soil forming to the role vegetation plays in the water balance) and the role those processes play in their lives.

InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Curt Gervich: Using Regulating Carbon Emissions in Environment and Society at SUNY College at Plattsburgh
Curt Gervich, SUNY College at Plattsburgh
The course is a broad introduction to environmental challenges including those related to water, air, biodiversity, climate, energy, population, waste and consumption, among others. The course examines these dilemmas through the lens of structuralism. Therefore, we explore how societal structures such as family, community, race and gender, politics, economics, science and the media influence our perspectives and values related to environmental topics. For most class sessions students are asked to watch/listen to video/audio publications outside of class and to discuss these experiences together in small groups during the class sessions. Many class sessions also include an "activity" component such as brief internet research projects, mapping projects, or writing exercises, for example.

Subject: Biology:Biogeochemistry:Carbon Cycling, Environmental Science
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Regulating Carbon Emissions

Sandra Penny: Using Regulating Carbon Emissions in Energy and the Environment (SCI-105) at Bard College
Sandra Penny, The Sage Colleges-Albany Campus
We spent 4 weeks on this module at the conclusion of a 14-week semester in an introductory course called "Energy and the Environment." Inclusion of this module is my first attempt to reform the course into a more activity-based environment that recognizes that global warming is a topic of special importance to the students. The real strength of this unit is that it brings in economics and politics to the discussion of climate change. About half of my students were business and public policy majors, and they welcomed the opportunity to make connections between a topic about which they are deeply concerned – global warming – and the topics that they have already chosen for their major field of study.

Subject: Environmental Science:Policy:Environmental Decision-Making, Environmental Science:Energy, Environmental Science
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses

Pinar Batur: Using Regulating Carbon Emissions in Killing Fog: Coal, Energy and Pollution at Vassar College
Pinar Batur, Vassar College
The course that I taught, 281-Killing Fog: Coal, Energy and Pollution, is a half-credit course, cross-listed between Environmental Studies, International Studies and Sociology. Open to all students, it was attended by 30-37 students, some 16 of them formally registered for a grade and others for pass-fail, or auditing. I organized he course into two sessions per week: two-hour Monday lectures were complemented by one-hour discussion or project sessions on Friday. Some of the Friday sessions were designed for one-on-one consultation with me as an advisor on the students' research. As a multidisciplinary course, the focus was to connect scientific knowledge to public policy making, to explore the boundaries of civic responsibility, and the communication of risk.

Subject: Geoscience:Atmospheric Science:Climate Change, Environmental Science:Energy:Energy Policy , Environmental Science:Global Change and Climate:Climate Change:Public policy, Environmental Science:Policy:Energy Policy, Geoscience:Atmospheric Science:Climate Change:Public policy , Environmental Science:Policy
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Regulating Carbon Emissions

Bruce Douglas: Using Measuring Water Resources with GPS, Gravity, and Traditional Methods in Physical Geology at Indiana University–Bloomington
Bruce Douglas, Indiana University-Bloomington
This module was used in an introductory physical geology course with great success despite the fact that it was designed for upper level topical courses. The success was in part a testimony to the ability of the students in the class and their excitement to learn about, and analyze, the various applications of geodetic data sets that they did not know existed. The was amplified when they understood that this data could be used for making critical societal decisions concerning water use and allocation. The students, while initially a bit timid with the use of some of the higher level functions of Excel, became adept at plotting and interpreting the large time series that comprise much of the data included in the module.

Subject: Geoscience:Geology
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses

Carey Gazis: Using Measuring Water Resources with GPS, Gravity, and Traditional Methods in Hydrogeology at Central Washington University
Carey Gazis, Central Washington University
A Case Study of Groundwater and California Drought in a Hydrogeology Course. I teach a hydrogeology course each year for undergraduate seniors and M.S. students. In this course, students learn the fundamental concepts about groundwater, how it enters the subsurface, is stored, and how humans use and rely on this resource. Each year, we use the same textbook and the same concepts are taught. Current concerns about groundwater availability and quality are often discussed, but are rarely examined in detail. This year, through the GETSI module, we had the opportunity to not only discuss a current groundwater concern, but to examine it in detail looking at data collected using emerging methods to quantify terrestrial water budgets.

Subject: Geoscience:Hydrology
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16), Graduate/Professional

Rebecca Teed: Using Changing Biosphere in Concepts in Earth Science for Middle-Childhood Educators II at Wright State University-Main Campus
Rebecca Teed, Wright State University-Main Campus
Earth Systems for Pre-service Science Teachers My students are preparing to teach science themselves, and are expected to learn through inquiry. This course is intended to address a number of major themes in middle-grades science standards, and to emphasize approaches and topics that are especially challenging, like systems thinking and Earth history. This module offers an important hook for Earth history: the current mass extinction resulting from multiple modern ecological crises including climate change, invasive species, and habitat destruction. Systems thinking is vital to understanding the chains of cause and effect that drive both ancient and modern mass extinctions. My students were very interested in the similarities between ancient and modern disasters.

Subject: Physics:Education Foundations
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Changing Biosphere

Camille Holmgren: Using Changing Biosphere in World Natural Environments at SUNY Buffalo State
Camille Holmgren, SUNY Buffalo State
This module was used over several weeks in an introductory physical geography course. Although required for Geography majors, it is primarily populated by non-majors seeking to fulfill their natural science requirement. The focus on a big issue facing society, extinctions and biodiversity loss, led to a high level of engagement among students who came to the course with a range of academic backgrounds, interests, and abilities. Students were also introduced to scientific uncertainty and the idea that there is not always a single answer or approach for addressing societal issues such as setting priorities for biodiversity conservation.

Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Changing Biosphere

Jim Washburne: Using in Introduction to Critical Zone Science at The University of Arizona
Jim Washburne, The University of Arizona
I taught a small (8 person) mixed 400/500 level seminar course called Introduction to Critical Zone Science so the students were a mix of upper class undergraduates and graduates. Some of my students had prior experience (internships/RA's) with the actual Critical Zone research teams on campus so brought (and shared) their advanced but unique experiences with the class. Despite or perhaps because of their advanced level, most students had only been exposed to a narrow range of ideas relative to the big picture of Critical Zone integrated systems.

Subject: Geoscience:Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16), Graduate/Professional
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science