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Scott Linneman: Using Exploring Geoscience Methods with Secondary Education Students in Methods in Secondary Education for Science Teachers at Western Washington University
This one quarter, 5-credit course is for pre-service secondary science teachers. It includes the study of literature, curriculum, and teaching strategies in life, Earth, and physical sciences for grades 4-12. Students also participate in peer teaching and school observations. Prerequisites include admission to the secondary teaching program and a major or concentration in natural sciences; one course as an introduction to secondary education; and one course as an introduction to science education.

Subject: Geoscience, Education
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers, InTeGrate and NGSS
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Exploring Geoscience Methods

Brittany Brand: Using Map Your Hazards! in Volcanoes and Society at Boise State University
The objective of this course is to explore volcanoes and volcanic eruptions, and examine their effect on the environment, life, and human societies. Local examples of recent volcanism and ancient examples of mega-eruptions are used to illustrate these principals. I use the "Volcano" aspect of the course to work on critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills. The "Society" portion of the class focuses on the societal relevance of studying volcanoes, including assessing volcanic hazards, exploring volcanic risk perception and mitigating volcanic risk through communication with the public.

Subject: Geoscience
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Map your Hazards!

Melissa Schlegel: Using Map Your Hazards! in Natural Disasters and Environmental Geology at the College of Western Idaho
The course title is Natural Disasters and Environmental Geology. As a class, we examine 1) the interaction between modern society and Earth processes that are hazardous (e.g. volcanoes, flooding, climate change, etc.), 2) how communities and individuals can limit the extent of damage from these hazards, and 3) how society is influencing the frequency and magnitude of many natural hazards. In addition, we discuss how natural hazards benefit our society and our environment.

Subject: Environmental Science:Natural Hazards
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses, Two Year Colleges
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Map your Hazards!

Pamela McMullin-Messier: Using Map Your Hazards! in Social Ecology at Central Washington University
Environmental sociology is defined as the sociological study of societal-environmental interactions; this definition presents an insolvable perspective of separating human cultures from the rest of the environment. Although the focus is the relationship between society and environment in general, environmental sociologists typically place special emphasis on studying the social factors that cause environmental problems, the societal impacts of those problems, and efforts to solve the problems. Ultimately, we examine how humans have used the various aspects of their social structures to adapt to or control their physical environment.

Subject: Sociology
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Map your Hazards!

Joy Branlund: How Humans' Dependence on Earth's Mineral Resources meets a community college's general-education goals, at Southwestern Illinois College
About this Course An introductory Earth Science course primarily comprised of non-science majors. 24 students Two 95-minute lecture sessions One 2-hour lab Community college Syllabus (Acrobat (PDF) 281kB Oct30 13) ...

Subject: Geoscience:Geology:Economic Geology, Environmental Geology, Environmental Science, Sustainability, Mineral Resources
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Two Year Colleges, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Humans' Dependence on Earth's Mineral Resources

Becca Walker: Teaching Climate of Change in an Introductory Oceanography Course for Nonscience Majors at Mt. San Antonio College, CA
OCEA10 provides an introduction to the ocean environment, including geological, chemical, physical, and biological oceanography topics. Students are told to be prepared to work hard and use their brain! This is not a marine biology course. The course covers marine biology briefly, but the majority of the course focus is geology, chemistry, and physics.

Subject: Geoscience:Oceanography
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses, Two Year Colleges
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Climate of Change

Kyle Gray: Using Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity in Investigations into Earth and Space Science
About this Course A 200-level geology course for pre-service teachers. 15 students Two 110-minute class sessions One 50-minute classsession four-year public liberal arts university Syllabus (Acrobat (PDF) 454kB ...

Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Interactions between Water, Earth’s Surface, and Human Activity

Julie Monet: Using Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface & Human Activity in Concepts in Earth & Space Science
About this Course A 300-level geology course for pre-service teachers. 24 students One 50-minute lecture session Two 2-hour labs weekly four-year state university Syllabus (Acrobat (PDF) 113kB Jul6 14) Show the ...

Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Interactions between Water, Earth’s Surface, and Human Activity

Robert Loeb: Using the A Growing Concern Module in Introductory Soil Science at Pennsylvania State University-Penn State DuBois
Robert Loeb, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
The goal of Introductory Soil Science is to introduce the study of soil properties and processes and their relationships to land use, plant growth, environmental quality, and society. My offering of the course is online and serves a population of students who are primarily majors in the agricultural and earth sciences. Transforming the six units of a Growing Concern from the face-to-face format to the on-line setting resulted in valuable additions in regard to environmental quality and society.

Subject: Environmental Science:Soils and Agriculture, Geoscience:Soils
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Online/Distance/Hybrid Courses, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: A Growing Concern

Rachel Pigg: Using InTeGrate Materials in Survey of Life at Presbyterian College
Rachel Pigg, University of Louisville
My nonmajors biology students enjoyed the new content provided by three InTeGrate modules: (1) Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity, (2) Climate of Change, and (3) A Growing Concern. Elements and exercises from all three were interleaved into existing course content, which greatly enhanced student engagement in lecture and lab.

Subject: Biology:Evolution, Ecology, Biology
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Climate of Change , Interactions between Water, Earth’s Surface, and Human Activity , A Growing Concern