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Laurel Goodell: Teaching Living on the Edge
Emphasis is on the geological processes that underlie natural hazards, with discussion of relevant policy issues tied to reading recent newspaper and popular science articles. Topics include earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, tsunami, hurricanes, floods, meteorite impacts, and global warming.

Subject: Environmental Science:Natural Hazards
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), College Introductory
Teaching Context: Large Lecture Classes, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Living on the Edge

Peter Selkin: Teaching Living on the Edge in Physical Geology at University of Washington, Tacoma
This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and theories of geology and provides them with a basic understanding of how Earth works. Topics covered include plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, the rock cycle, continents and oceans, and surface processes.

Subject: Geoscience:Geology
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Living on the Edge

Becca Walker: Teaching Climate of Change in an Introductory Oceanography Course for Nonscience Majors at Mt. San Antonio College, CA
OCEA10 provides an introduction to the ocean environment, including geological, chemical, physical, and biological oceanography topics. Students are told to be prepared to work hard and use their brain! This is not a marine biology course. The course covers marine biology briefly, but the majority of the course focus is geology, chemistry, and physics.

Subject: Geoscience:Oceanography
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), College Introductory
Teaching Context: Two Year Colleges, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Climate of Change

Cynthia Fadem: Teaching Climate of Change in Environmental Geology at Earlham College
This course introduces whole‐Earth materials and processes with a focus on the formation of and human interaction with surficial environments. We examine phenomena such as volcanoes, earthquakes, wasting, flooding, desertification, and climate change. Discussions and lectures employ case studies allowing students to place geologic phenomena in human context, including analysis of sustainable development, water supply, mining, agriculture, and waste disposal practices. Laboratory and field trip exercises employ maps, specimens, real‐world data sets, and local geological sites and resources. This course is designed for students who want to understand Earth and how it works.

Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):College Introductory, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Climate of Change

Cindy Shellito: Adapting Climate of Change for a Large Lecture Course at the University of Northern Colorado
About this Course An an introductory survey course in meteorology and climatology. 55–72 students Three 50-minute lecture sessions One 2-hour lab weekly public university Syllabus (Acrobat (PDF) 180kB Aug29 13) ...

Subject: Geoscience:Atmospheric Science:Climatology , Meteorology
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), College Introductory
Teaching Context: Large Lecture Classes, Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Climate of Change

James Ebert: Using Exploring Geoscience Methods with Secondary Education Students in ESCI 315: Laboratory Techniques in Earth Science at SUNY Oneonta
In addition to addressing pedagogical content knowledge, ESCI 315 helps students develop skills in inquiry-based teaching. The co-requisite for ESCI 315 is a companion course that is similar but focuses on middle school science. Both courses function as miniature "methods" courses that focus on hands-on learning before the students take the actual "methods" course, which is generally taken in the following fall semester.

Subject: Education, Geoscience
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Exploring Geoscience Methods

Scott Linneman: Using Exploring Geoscience Methods with Secondary Education Students in Methods in Secondary Education for Science Teachers at Western Washington University
This one quarter, 5-credit course is for pre-service secondary science teachers. It includes the study of literature, curriculum, and teaching strategies in life, Earth, and physical sciences for grades 4-12. Students also participate in peer teaching and school observations. Prerequisites include admission to the secondary teaching program and a major or concentration in natural sciences; one course as an introduction to secondary education; and one course as an introduction to science education.

Subject: Education, Geoscience
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers, InTeGrate and NGSS
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Exploring Geoscience Methods

Jeff Thomas: Using Exploring Geoscience Methods with Secondary Education Students in the History and Nature of Science at Central Connecticut State University
During the first five weeks of the course, students are introduced to the history and nature of science, the methods of science, and crosscutting science concepts (e.g. patterns, systems). This includes theoretical constructs (e.g. readings about inductive and deductive scientific reasoning) as well as applications for the secondary science classroom (e.g. doing inquiry-based activities). During the second five weeks, students implement an inquiry-based activity based on a major scientific discovery that incorporates the nature and methods of science. Students also create a formal presentation about this discovery (e.g. history of the discovery, methods utilized by scientists), as well as the impact of this discovery on society.

Teaching Context: Courses for Future Teachers
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Exploring Geoscience Methods

Pamela McMullin-Messier: Using Map Your Hazards! in Social Ecology at Central Washington University
Environmental sociology is defined as the sociological study of societal-environmental interactions; this definition presents an insolvable perspective of separating human cultures from the rest of the environment. Although the focus is the relationship between society and environment in general, environmental sociologists typically place special emphasis on studying the social factors that cause environmental problems, the societal impacts of those problems, and efforts to solve the problems. Ultimately, we examine how humans have used the various aspects of their social structures to adapt to or control their physical environment.

Subject: Sociology
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Map your Hazards!

Brittany Brand: Using Map Your Hazards! in Volcanoes and Society at Boise State University
The objective of this course is to explore volcanoes and volcanic eruptions, and examine their effect on the environment, life, and human societies. Local examples of recent volcanism and ancient examples of mega-eruptions are used to illustrate these principals. I use the "Volcano" aspect of the course to work on critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills. The "Society" portion of the class focuses on the societal relevance of studying volcanoes, including assessing volcanic hazards, exploring volcanic risk perception and mitigating volcanic risk through communication with the public.

Subject: Geoscience
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Map your Hazards!