Instructor Stories

Refine the Results↓

Help

Results 1 - 10 of 184 matches

Adam Wymore: Introduction to Critical Zone Science at University of New Hampshire-Main Campus
Adam Wymore, University of New Hampshire-Main Campus
This course was taught as an upper-division elective to Environmental Science Majors at the University of New Hampshire. The student body reflected a mix of students specializing in Ecosystem Ecology, Soils, and Hydrology. This diversity, as well as my training as a biologist made for an rich combination of perspectives on Critical Zone Science. At the end of course, students really appreciated the holistic approach to environmental and earth system science.

Subject: Geoscience:Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16)
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Martha Conklin: Critical Zone Science at University of California-Merced
Martha Conklin, University of California-Merced
Turning students on to the "critical zone" My course is an upper level multidisciplinary course that uses the critical zone (the zone between bedrock and the tops of trees) to illustrate the synergy between the lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. This course was taught with short lectures, online readings and group activities both in and out of class. It culminated with a research paper and a 10-min presentation of the research paper. The students were incredibly engaged throughout the class. The class was open to all majors – so there was a fraction of seniors trying to fill in a last course. I was excited about the level of participation. The in-class exercises helped students to become comfortable with the material. We had an optional fieldtrip to the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory and it was right after we had dug a number of soil pits – so the students could see the in situ heterogeneity. I think this class helps students synthesize the interconnectedness of critical zone processes (from soil forming to the role vegetation plays in the water balance) and the role those processes play in their lives.

InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Curt Gervich: Using Regulating Carbon Emissions in Environment and Society at SUNY College at Plattsburgh
Curt Gervich, SUNY College at Plattsburgh
The course is a broad introduction to environmental challenges including those related to water, air, biodiversity, climate, energy, population, waste and consumption, among others. The course examines these dilemmas through the lens of structuralism. Therefore, we explore how societal structures such as family, community, race and gender, politics, economics, science and the media influence our perspectives and values related to environmental topics. For most class sessions students are asked to watch/listen to video/audio publications outside of class and to discuss these experiences together in small groups during the class sessions. Many class sessions also include an "activity" component such as brief internet research projects, mapping projects, or writing exercises, for example.

Subject: Biology:Biogeochemistry:Carbon Cycling, Environmental Science
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Regulating Carbon Emissions

Camille Holmgren: Using Changing Biosphere in World Natural Environments at SUNY Buffalo State
Camille Holmgren, SUNY Buffalo State
This module was used over several weeks in an introductory physical geography course. Although required for Geography majors, it is primarily populated by non-majors seeking to fulfill their natural science requirement. The focus on a big issue facing society, extinctions and biodiversity loss, led to a high level of engagement among students who came to the course with a range of academic backgrounds, interests, and abilities. Students were also introduced to scientific uncertainty and the idea that there is not always a single answer or approach for addressing societal issues such as setting priorities for biodiversity conservation.

Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Changing Biosphere

Jim Washburne: Using in Introduction to Critical Zone Science at The University of Arizona
Jim Washburne, The University of Arizona
I taught a small (8 person) mixed 400/500 level seminar course called Introduction to Critical Zone Science so the students were a mix of upper class undergraduates and graduates. Some of my students had prior experience (internships/RA's) with the actual Critical Zone research teams on campus so brought (and shared) their advanced but unique experiences with the class. Despite or perhaps because of their advanced level, most students had only been exposed to a narrow range of ideas relative to the big picture of Critical Zone integrated systems.

Subject: Geoscience:Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16), Graduate/Professional
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Adam Hoffman: Using in Introduction to the Critical Zone Sciences at University of Dubuque
Adam Hoffman, University of Dubuque
I have had success teaching the entire Introduction to Critical Zone Sciences course in a variety of contexts. I first taught the course in a traditional face-to-face format over the course of a semester. The students were very excited and enjoyed the variety of disciplines covered in the course and the real-world data that were assigned to interact with. The second time I taught the course I taught it as an online summer class and again the feedback was positive regarding the data analysis activities.

Subject: Geoscience:Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Teaching Context: Online/Distance/Hybrid Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Ashlee Dere: Introduction to the Critical Zone at University of Nebraska at Omaha
Ashlee Dere, University of Nebraska at Omaha
The Introduction to the Critical Zone modules work well as a small (< 20 students) upper level/graduate course for geoscience majors and is now a permanent part of our geoscience curriculum. The materials employ active learning techniques that are enjoyable to work on with the students and provide a strong foundation in Critical Zone Science. Students really enjoyed the interdisciplinary nature of the material and the opportunity to use real data and practice skills they are likely to use in their jobs. The students reported and demonstrated improvement in their critical thinking skills and confidence in problem solving because the course focused on building skills rather than memorizing content.

Subject: Geoscience, Soils:Critical Zone Processes
Grade Level: College Upper (15-16), Graduate/Professional
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Critical Zone Science

Megan Steinweg: Using InTeGrate materials in Nutrient Transformations at Roanoke College
Megan Steinweg, Roanoke College
I was teaching my upper level nutrient transformation course for the second time when I started to add in Integrate modules. The first time I taught the course it was lecture heavy with some activities interspersed. The Integrate modules had several in and out of class activities that related to topics that I already wanted to cover in my course. My students very much enjoyed the in-class activities and I thought the homework assignments reinforced the topics well. It was great hearing the buzz of students talking in class about the topic during activities. Students recognized the reinforcement of certain concepts throughout the course and mentioned that they hadn't experienced that often in other courses but appreciated the opportunity to apply their knowledge in new systems.

Caryl Waggett: Using Lead in the Environment in ES 415: Environmental Health, at Allegheny College
Caryl Waggett, Allegheny College
Investigation and analysis of current human health impacts related to environmental issues. Students study the ecological, physiological, and social underpinnings of case studies, evaluate causal and correlative associations using key epidemiological tools, design and assess control and mitigation efforts, and develop a response to a local or regional environmental health issue. Students also interpret and conduct risk assessments to prioritize various issues and to evaluate the severity of impacts on specific populations, examining how environmental issues often place disproportionate health burdens on disenfranchised communities and individuals including laboratory component.

Subject: Environmental Science, Education, Health Sciences
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14):Introductory Level, College Upper (15-16), College Lower (13-14)
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Lead in the Environment

William Hansen: Environmental Science at Worcester State University
William Hansen, Worcester State University
Environmental Science is a class that draws in concepts from across the science disciplines as well as technological and societal factors. As such it can be complex for students to navigate with respect to terminology, sources of information and synthesis of concepts. Environmental Science classes typically have a small number of very vocal students but a large number of students with a lack of familiarity with these concepts and therefore many tend not to participate in class discussions. Integrate materials work well in bringing all students into the discussion through student-to-student interaction and tie fundamental geoscience concepts back to human actions in a way that facilitates student's exploration and interaction.

Subject: Environmental Science
Grade Level: College Lower (13-14), Introductory Level
Teaching Context: Intro Courses
InTeGrate Modules and Courses: Water Science and Society , Soils, Systems, and Society