Cutting Edge > Career Prep > Workshop 2014 > Program

Workshop Program

Jump down to: Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday

Opening day

1:00-7:00 Workshop registration: second floor lobby of the Sennott Square building

Optional pre-workshop events on Monday afternoon

2:15-3:00 Concurrent sessions on research, teaching, careers, and career path

The transition from the more regimented learning in classes to the creative problem solving necessary for original research is easier for some graduate students than others. This session will discuss ways to help create a flexible, collaborative work environment while maintaining high standards.

3:10-4:10 Concurrent sessions

At some point in your professional training, you may have worked with an effective mentor. This session will explore how to cultivate a network of mentors in your professional life and to identify what's involved in serving as a successful mentor to others.
4:20-5:20 Families and careers: A panel discussion - Rachel O'Brien (moderator) and other workshop leaders
This session offers a discussion of issues, opportunities, and choices associated with families and careers, including children, dual-career couples, and more, with many opportunities to ask questions of the session leaders.

Workshop begins

5:30-6:00 Reception and icebreaker activities - Barb Tewksbury and Rachel O'Brien

6:00-7:00 Dinner

7:00-9:00 Introductions and opening session

Tuesday, July 1

7:00-8:10 Breakfast

8:10-8:30 Overview of day- Barb Tewksbury and Rachel O'Brien

Theme for the day: Who are you as a teacher?


8:30-9:40 Getting ready for class: A fresh look at course design - Barb Tewksbury

This presentation will describe three major steps in designing an effective learning environment: 1) developing specific, student-friendly learning goals; 2) designing tasks for feedback and assessment; and 3) incorporating targeted teaching and learning activities. Participants will leave with sample learning goals, examples of formative and summative assessment tasks linked to the learning goals, and sample activities that will engage students as active participants in class rather than passive observers.

9:40-10:00 Break


10:00-10:50 Teaching breakout sessions
  • Engaging students in the classroom through interactive lectures - Becca Walker and Rosemary Capo
Today's geoscience courses are now open to an abundance of different teaching styles that encourage students to think in different ways about the world around them. This workshop will discuss interactive pedagogies that faculty are using to ensure student interaction and comprehension.
  • Getting students to think about their learning, attitudes, and motivation - Kyle Fredrick
Participants will be introduced to the components of the affective domain – motivations and attitudes towards learning – and the concept of self-regulation (students monitoring of their learning process). Students tend to enter our classrooms claiming to be motivated to learn, but without the skills to succeed. We will consider some simple techniques that participants can use to guide students to be more thoughtful about their learning.
  • Effective teaching in the field - Barb Tewksbury

11:00-11:50 Teaching breakout sessions

  • Ways to engage students: Place-based learning and service learning - Scott Bair and Matt Kirby
Cultivating citizen scientists is one of our many jobs as professors. Place-based or service learning courses link student learning to a familiar context and local social issues. These types of courses require substantial planning, organization, and time, but the result may be increased student learning gains and an understanding of relevant issues underpinning to a local area.This session will discuss some strategies for developing and sustaining place-based or service learning courses.
  • Teaching an intro course: intro courses, what are the challenges, audience - Kyle Fredrick, and Becca Walker, and Rosemary Capo
  • Incorporating data into undergraduate courses - Rachel O'Brien
Data collection, reduction, analysis, and interpretation are powerful tools that help students practice the process of science. In this session we'll explore the myriad of ways you can incorporate using data in your introductory and upper-level courses to involve your students in active learning.

12:00-1:20 Lunch and optional lunch-time discussions

1:30-3:10 Designing an effective lesson - Barb Tewksbury

3:10-3:30 Break

3:30-5:00 Teaching statements concurrent sessions: Articulating your teaching goals and highlighting your accomplishments
  • Introduction to teaching statements -Rachel O'Brien
This session is designed to "jump start" the writing process for those who have yet to draft a teaching statement. Participants will articulate their teaching goals and accomplishments and begin the process of folding these into a concise teaching statement.
  • Review of teaching statements - Barb Tewksbury and other leaders
Participants who bring eight copies of their teaching statements will work in small groups, each with a workshop leader, reviewing each other's statements and offering feedback. Leaders will also offer their comments.

5:00-5:15 Wrap-up and daily road check

6:00-7:00 Dinner

7:30-8:30 Optional evening discussions

  • Early career time management - Rachel O'Brien and Kyle Fredrick
  • Writing your first research grant proposals - Barb Tewksbury and Rosemary Capo
  • Short reviews (10 minutes) of curriculum vitae and/or cover letter for job application for participants who have brought these documents with them - Becca Walker, Matt Kirby, and Scott Bair

Wednesday, July 2

7:00-8:10 Breakfast

Theme for the morning: Who are you as a researcher?

8:10-8:20 Overview of day and report on daily road check - Barb Tewksbury, Rachel O'Brien

8:20-8:55 Making a strong first impression: The elevator talk - Rachel O'Brien

9:00-9:40 Moving your research forward to new settings: Breakout sessions (will be repeated at 10:00)

  • Two-year colleges - Becca Walker
  • Primarily undergraduate institutions - Rachel O'Brien, Barb Tewskbury, Kyle Fredrick
  • Graduate institutions - Scott Bair, Rosemary Capo, Matt Kirby

9:40-10:00 Break

10:00-10:40 Moving your research forward to new settings: Breakout sessions (repeated from 9:00)
  • Two-year colleges - Becca Walker
  • Primarily undergraduate institutions - Rachel O'Brien, Barb Tewskbury, Kyle Fredrick
  • Graduate institutions - Scott Bair, Rosemary Capo, Matt Kirby

10:50-12:15 Research statements: Concurrent sessions

  • Introduction to research statements - Matt Kirby
This session is designed to "jump start" the writing process for those who have yet to draft a research statement and will include discussion of key aspects of research statements intended for a particular type of institution (e.g., liberal arts college, research university).
  • Review of research statements - Barb Tewksbury and other leaders
Participants who bring eight copies of their research statements will work in small groups, each with a workshop leader, reviewing each other's statements and offering feedback. Leaders will also offer their comments and will discuss key aspects of research statements intended for a particular type of institution (e.g., liberal arts college, research university).
  • Professional opportunities at two-year colleges - Becca Walker

12:15-1:30 Lunch and optional lunch-time discussions


Theme for the afternoon: Choosing where you want to go and getting there

1:30-2:50 Mapping your career: Choices, balance, and action planning - Rachel O'Brien and other workshop leaders

Given where you are in your career and what you have learned at this workshop, reflect on your long-term goals or "dream job." What are your shorter-term goals? What are your next steps? What advice would help you most at this point?

2:50-3:10 Break

3:10-5:00 The academic job search: Applications, interviews, teaching demonstrations, job talks, and negotiating - Barb Tewksbury and other workshop leaders

5:00-5:30 Closing remarks and end-of-workshop evaluation

6:30 or 7:00 Dinner

Thursday, July 3

7:00-8:20 Breakfast

Optional workshop sessions in the morning

Concurrent Sessions

8:30-9:30 Concurrent Optional Sessions I

Community colleges educate over 40% of all college students in the US and the number is growing. This session will explore some of the innovative changes that are currently happening at two-year colleges (2YC) and how they are becoming the first choice for many entering higher education. The session will also discuss the hiring methods, pay structure, and tenure processes of 2YCs.
Flash forward - you have been offered a job - congratulations! But now the challenges really begin. One of these challenges is setting up your lab. It sounds easy...and fun! Alas, setting up your lab requires critical planning to insure your success and eventual tenure. This session will discuss strategies for setting up your first lab as well as how to get your lab up-and-running.

9:45-10:45 Concurrent Optional Sessions II

Geoscience can be explored through the lenses of history, literature, politics, visual and performance art, etc.. This discussion will focus on ideas for emphasizing the interdisciplinary nature of geoscience within the field itself, across the sciences, and out into the other disciplines on campus.
Starting a career at a new institution can provide opportunities for new research arenas and challenges to maintaining existing ones. Join us for advice on how cultivating productive and sustainable research relationships in and outside of your institution can aid your passage into new research fields while helping you maintain productivity in existing areas.
Becoming a faculty member means joining an academic department (or program) as well as a particular institution. Service to those two groups is a part of faculty workload that you'll encounter. We'll discuss the ways for you to do this work effectively while keeping a balance to your workload.

11:00-12:00 Concurrent Optional Sessions III

In this session we will discuss strategies for what you can do to prepare before an interview, to present yourself during interviews, and to prepare for the types of questions you might be asked during an interview.
Being a professor is a balancing act between teaching service, and research. How you manage your time will dictate, to a large extent, your ability to achieve your research goals. Acquiring this balance is easier said than done. In this session, we will explore some time management techniques aimed at achieving research success.






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