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Unit 5: Modern CO2 Accumulation

Pamela Gore (Perimeter College, Georgia State University)
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These materials have been reviewed for their alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards as detailed below. Visit InTeGrate and the NGSS to learn more.

Overview

Students examine atmospheric [CO2] vs. Time graphs at different time scales ranging from days to 100,000 years. They also evaluate the relationships between these to other related changes in temperature and ocean pH in an effort to find cause and effect. There is an emphasis on pattern recognition and observations at different scales.

Science and Engineering Practices

Analyzing and Interpreting Data: Construct, analyze, and/or interpret graphical displays of data and/or large data sets to identify linear and nonlinear relationships. MS-P4.1:

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: Make a quantitative and/or qualitative claim regarding the relationship between dependent and independent variables. HS-P6.1:

Analyzing and Interpreting Data: Evaluate the impact of new data on a working explanation and/or model of a proposed process or system. HS-P4.5:

Analyzing and Interpreting Data: Compare and contrast various types of data sets (e.g., self-generated, archival) to examine consistency of measurements and observations. HS-P4.4:

Cross Cutting Concepts

Scale, Proportion and Quantity: The significance of a phenomenon is dependent on the scale, proportion, and quantity at which it occurs. HS-C3.1:

Scale, Proportion and Quantity: Patterns observable at one scale may not be observable or exist at other scales. HS-C3.3:

Patterns: Empirical evidence is needed to identify patterns. HS-C1.5:

Patterns: Different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied and can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena HS-C1.1:

Cause and effect: Empirical evidence is required to differentiate between cause and correlation and make claims about specific causes and effects. HS-C2.1:

Disciplinary Core Ideas

Global Climate Change: Human activities, such as the release of greenhouse gases from burning fossil fuels, are major factors in the current rise in Earth’s mean surface temperature (global warming). Reducing the level of climate change and reducing human vulnerability to whatever climate changes do occur depend on the understanding of climate science, engineering capabilities, and other kinds of knowledge, such as understanding of human behavior and on applying that knowledge wisely in decisions and activities. MS-ESS3.D1:

Weather and Climate: Gradual atmospheric changes were due to plants and other organisms that captured carbon dioxide and released oxygen. HS-ESS2.D2:

Weather and Climate: Changes in the atmosphere due to human activity have increased carbon dioxide concentrations and thus affect climate. HS-ESS2.D3:

Earth Materials and Systems: The geological record shows that changes to global and regional climate can be caused by interactions among changes in the sun’s energy output or Earth’s orbit, tectonic events, ocean circulation, volcanic activity, glaciers, vegetation, and human activities. These changes can occur on a variety of time scales from sudden (e.g., volcanic ash clouds) to intermediate (ice ages) to very long-term tectonic cycles. HS-ESS2.A3:

Performance Expectations

Earth's Systems: Analyze geoscience data to make the claim that one change to Earth's surface can create feedbacks that cause changes to other Earth systems. HS-ESS2-2:

  1. This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process. This rigorous, structured process includes:

    • team-based development to ensure materials are appropriate across multiple educational settings.
    • multiple iterative reviews and feedback cycles through the course of material development with input to the authoring team from both project editors and an external assessment team.
    • real in-class testing of materials in at least 3 institutions with external review of student assessment data.
    • multiple reviews to ensure the materials meet the InTeGrate materials rubric which codifies best practices in curricular development, student assessment and pedagogic techniques.
    • review by external experts for accuracy of the science content.

  2. This activity was selected for the On the Cutting Edge Reviewed Teaching Collection

    This activity has received positive reviews in a peer review process involving five review categories. The five categories included in the process are

    • Scientific Accuracy
    • Alignment of Learning Goals, Activities, and Assessments
    • Pedagogic Effectiveness
    • Robustness (usability and dependability of all components)
    • Completeness of the ActivitySheet web page

    For more information about the peer review process itself, please see http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/review.html.


This page first made public: Jul 15, 2016

Summary

Students will examine data that record the modern increase in carbon dioxide concentrations and the associated increase in average temperatures, and they will investigate the effects of carbon dioxide on various components of the Earth system (atmosphere, cryosphere, hydrosphere — oceans). Students also learn how the burning of fossil fuels contributes to increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide.

Learning Goals

This unit addresses several of the grand challenges facing society, including energy and its relationship to the environmental issues of climate change and environmental degradation.

  1. Students will relate seasonal and long-term trends in atmospheric concentrations of CO2 to fluxes in the carbon cycle.
  2. Students will articulate the modern consequences of increasing CO2 levels, including climate change and ocean acidification.
  3. Students will make predictions about future trends in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and their consequences.

Context for Use

This unit is designed for use in an introductory-level college geoscience or environmental science course. It can be adapted for use in online instruction, individual/independent study courses, and large lecture hall-style classes. The exercises are designed to be completed in a 50-minute course structure, but they can be shortened or lengthened based on the level of detail desired for class discussions. This time estimate does not include any out-of-class extensions to the activities. Students and instructors will need copies of handouts, computer, access to the Internet, and a classroom projector.

Description and Teaching Materials

Description and Teaching Materials

The overall flow of this unit is as follows:

This unit begins with two short videos. The videos may be shown in class, or assigned for students to view before coming to class.

  1. Students watch a short video about Charles David Keeling and the development of the record of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere.
  2. Students watch a video showing the buildup of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere.

Students explore changes in carbon dioxide over various intervals of time in a Gallery Walk activity.

Following the Gallery Walk, the instructor shows the graphs as part of a PowerPoint presentation, and asks the groups to report orally on their thoughts about each graph. The instructor will provide feedback, clear up misconceptions, and offer additional information.

After the PowerPoint presentation, students watch two short videos on ocean acidification.

A suite of optional activities are also included, which can be used for homework, labs, or longer classes.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Pre-class Preparation

The instructor prints out a series of diagrams and questions. The diagrams and questions can be taped to the wall in the classroom, on tables in the classroom, or in the hall, along with a piece of chart paper for each diagram. Markers will need to be provided for students to write on the chart paper.

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In-class activities

Students watch two short videos about carbon dioxide in class, or this can be assigned for students to do before class.

Video 1. Charles Keeling (1928-2005) and NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory from NOAA ESRL (3:49 minutes)
Video about Charles David Keeling and the development of the record of carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere.

Video 2. A year in the life of Earth's carbon dioxide from NASA Goddard (3:10 minutes)
A NASA visualization showing plumes of CO2 in the northern hemisphere, and seasonal cycles of CO2.

Gallery Walk (20 min, allowing 2 minutes per diagram)

The instructor prints out a series of ten diagrams. The diagrams can be taped to the wall of the classroom, in the hall, or on tables in the classroom. Questions are provided for each diagram. Students circulate around to see each of the diagrams, consider and discuss the questions provided, write answers on the chart paper, and reflect on the answers written by other groups. Students are asked to speculate on causes of the changes in CO2. The annual cyclicity is due to seasonal changes in vegetation, and seasonal changes in fossil fuel use (keeping in mind that most landmasses are located in the northern hemisphere). Students compare highs and lows of CO2 levels over a two-year period and see that the peaks and valleys are a little higher each year. Students are asked to predict what CO2 levels were like previously, and to predict what CO2 levels will be like in future years. Students examine CO2 data from ice core back to 1700 to determine when CO2 began to rise rapidly, and to interpret the reason why. Ice core data also show the cyclicity in CO2 levels over the past 800,000 years. The presentation shows the relationship between CO2, global warming, and ocean acidification.

Unit 5 Gallery Walk Activity - Diagrams and Questions (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 1.5MB Aug17 16)
Unit 5 Gallery Walk Activity - Diagrams and Questions - PDF version (Acrobat (PDF) 1.6MB Aug17 16)

For comparison, Keeling curves, updated weekly, can be viewed on the Keeling Curve site from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Keeling curves are available for several time intervals (one week, one month, six months, one year, two years, or the full record going back to 1958).

Unit 5 PowerPoint Presentation (20 min)

Following the Gallery Walk, the instructor shows the PowerPoint Presentation with the questions for each diagram, gathers student feedback on the questions, and makes sure that critical concepts are covered that the students may have missed. Computer, Internet access, and a classroom projector are needed. It will be helpful to have a marker or chalk to write student responses on the board. At the end of the presentation there are review questions that students can answer orally or in writing.

Unit 5 PowerPoint (PowerPoint 3.4MB Aug17 16)

Following the PowerPoint presentation, students watch two videos on the consequences of ocean acidification. These videos are embedded in the Ocean Portal website from the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. It will be helpful for the instructor to make sure that the videos will run on the in-class computers if the videos will be shown during class time.

Video 3. Ocean Acidification by the Alliance for Climate Education (3:01 minutes)
This animated short video provides an excellent, easy-to-understand overview of CO2, and how it causes ocean acidification. The video discusses the effects of ocean acidification on sea creatures, the marine food chain, and human impacts.

Video 4. Oyster Farmers Facing Climate Change, a Vimeo video from Benjamin Drummond and Sara Steele (4:36 minutes)
This video shows the effect of ocean acidification on the biosphere, as oyster farmers tell of the effects of changing ocean chemistry on oysters.

Following the videos, students can answer the Review Questions at the end of the PowerPoint, either individually or in small-group discussion.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Optional Activities and/or Homework.

1. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Household Carbon Footprint Calculator (20 min)

Students use the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Household Carbon Footprint Calculator (or direct link to footprint calculator) to estimate their annual carbon dioxide emissions.

Student Worksheet
Online activity - How much carbon dioxide do you generate? Student Worksheet (Microsoft Word 37kB Aug17 16)
Online activity - How much carbon dioxide do you generate? Student Worksheet (Acrobat (PDF) 81kB Aug17 16)

Instructor's Guide

Online activity - How much carbon dioxide do you generate? Instructor’s Guide


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Online activity - How much carbon dioxide do you generate? Instructor’s Guide


This file is only accessible to verified educators. If you are a teacher or faculty member and would like access to this file please enter your email address to be verified as belonging to an educator.

2. Graphing authentic data on CO2 changes, 1958–present (15 min)

Using authentic CO2 data from Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, students produce graphs of the Keeling Curve using Excel. This activity requires access to a computer with Excel spreadsheet program. Mauna Loa Observatory CO2 data are available from NOAA's Global Greenhouse Gas Reference Network. Click on the Data tab, and on the Data page, look for:

Mauna Loa CO2 monthly mean data
Mauna Loa CO2 annual mean data

A. Convert the annual data to a graph

Copy the data into an Excel file and produce a scatter plot graph. You will need to click on the "Data" tab, and look for the "Text to columns" data tool. This tool will separate the data from the web page into individual columns. You will only need two of the data columns — year and CO2 concentration.

Select the year and mean columns. Make a "scatter plot" of the data in these two columns (year and mean or average CO2 concentration). (Click on "Insert" tab, and look for Scatter graph with lines.) Year should be on the X-axis, and CO2 should be on the Y-axis. Label the Y-axis for "Carbon dioxide (ppm)", and scale the axis from a minimum of 250 to a maximum of 450. Label the X-axis as "Year".

Right click on the data points and click on "Format Data Series". Using "Marker options" and "Marker fill", change the data markers to the smallest possible black dots (size 2). Right click on the data points and click on "Format Data Series". Use "Line color" to make a thin red line. Stretch your graph as necessary so that you can see the individual data points, connected by the red line.

B. Convert the monthly data to a graph

Repeat the basic procedure outlined in Part A, above, for the monthly CO2 data (Data from March 1958 through April 1974), following the additional instructions below.

Copy the data into Sheet 2 tab in Excel. Use the "Text to columns" data tool. Put all column heading labels into one row at the top. Where data are missing, it appears as -99.99. Delete these values and leave those cells blank, or you will end up with a very odd graph.

Select the decimal date column, and the average column. Make a "scatter plot" of the data in these two columns. Label the axes and make the markers and line as you did in Part A. Set marker options to NONE. Use "Line color" to make a thin red line. Stretch your graph as necessary so that you can see the individual data points, connected by the red line.

Teaching Notes and Tips

Several optional activities are provided for homework or for labs and longer classes. In the first activity, students use the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Greenhouse Gas Emissions Calculator to estimate their annual greenhouse gas emissions. This may be done in class or as a homework assignment. If it is done in class, the instructor will want to have a heating bill available to provide sample data for students to use.

The students can follow the directions in the second optional activity to use Excel to draw the Keeling Curve from authentic CO2 data from Mauna Loa Observatory, if computers are available.

Links to additional videos are provided in the References and Resources section below.

Assessment

Unit 5 Formative Assessment:
The activities in this unit can be used formatively, so students can develop their understanding, ask questions, and learn by trial in class with their peers. There are several formative assessments in this unit that are ungraded (theGallery Walk, questions in the PowerPoint presentations, and review questions at the end of the PowerPoint). There are also optional activities which can be either graded or ungraded, at the instructor's option (U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Household Carbon Footprint Calculatorand Graphing authentic data on CO2 changes).

Unit 5 Summative Assessment:
There is a 15–question summative assessment for Unit 5 with a selection of multiple choice and short answer questions.

Unit 5 Assessment


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Unit 5 Assessment


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Unit 5 Quiz answer key


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Unit 5 Quiz answer key


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References and Resources

Videos

Data

Activities

Articles

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »