Share-a-thon

Share-a-thon

Session Chair

Kate Pound, North Hennepin Community College

This event will begin with a round-robin 1-2 minute "lightning" round to preview each activity, with the remaining time for attendees to circulate among presenters to interact in a small group format. Presenters will have a table to set up the materials for their activity as Share-A-Thon attendees circulate. The goal of this event is for presenters to share their favorite activities or lessons with colleagues who will get an overview of activities and have time to ask questions. Presenters are asked to provide attendees with an overview and information about the activity (handout, online link) so that it can be reproduced by attendees in their own classrooms.

1:30pm-2:40pm
Investigating flood hazard mitigation via a role-playing case-study in Brays Bayou, Houston, Texas
Wayana Dolan, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Tamlin Pavelsky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Megan Plenge, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Set in the Brays Bayou watershed in Houston after extreme flooding due to Tropical Storm Allison in 2001, students will roleplay stakeholders in the neighborhood who are evaluating mitigation strategies to prevent future flooding. After completing an introductory activity and lecture, students are provided an introduction to their role including drivers, resource availability, and flood mitigation options. They will then meet with other people in the same role to devise a mitigation plan that best serves their specific community. Next, students will be broken into jigsaws with two people from each role in 'town hall'-style meeting groups. These groups will then have to find a solution that best meets the needs of as many stakeholders as possible. During the final class period, each town hall group will present their mitigation solution to the class, and then we will discuss what actually happened after the 2001 flooding event. Learning objectives include:Students will be able to calculate flood recurrence intervals, probabilities, and magnitudes Students will be able to compare and contrast the socioeconomic, temporal, and environmental pros and cons of flood mitigation solutionsStudents will be able to evaluate flood risk and make recommendations for rebuilding after a flood event
1:30pm-2:40pm
Interactive Online Diagrams
John Brady, Smith College
Clementine Hamelin, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities

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Many concepts used in the study of igneous and metamorphic rock are abstract and challenging for students to learn and for teachers to teach. Experienced petrologists work with graphs and diagrams that help them visualize and understand important data and, therefore, use those diagrams in their teaching. Students do not always find these diagrams to be intuitive and helpful. The features and mechanics of the diagrams can be an impediment to learning the principles of petrology. However, thoughtful programming using HTML and JavaScript can be used to create interactive online diagrams that give students captivating and informative control over puzzling diagrams. Familiar interactive tools such as mouseover effects that use coordinate values, sliders to change parameter values or to juxtapose images, buttons to change what is shown, etc. can be adapted to topic-specific pages. Using a standard web browser, we will show a variety of interactive diagrams such as phase diagrams that let students change temperature and pressure, photomicrographs that let students explore mineral composition data or zoom in for details, and graphs that let students watch temperature or chemistry change with a time slider. You will wish you had these tools as a student. (http://www.science.smith.edu/~jbrady/petrology/index.php -- username: jbrady-guest -- password: ReadMyT3xt)
1:30pm-2:40pm
Browser-based visualization tool for seismic records
Janine Birnbaum, Columbia University in the City of New York
Christopher Carchedi, Columbia University in the City of New York
Michelle Lee, Columbia University in the City of New York

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We present a visualization tool for publicly available seismic data. Seismic data is freely available online from global and regional seismic networks, but access and visualization often require specialist knowledge in seismology and computer programming. Our open-sourced program RecRead utilizes the Python packages Bokeh and ObsPy to present a browser-based graphical user interface (GUI) that can be run locally or on free online computing resources (Binder). This tool simplifies the process of selecting seismic records of an event, such as an earthquake, and allows for a variety of aesthetic visualization options appropriate for in-class demonstrations or labs where students can manipulate the data without the need for additional coding. The tool includes additional visualization for regional seismicity, allowing students to contextualize seismic events with concepts in plate tectonics.
1:30pm-2:40pm
Relative Age: Painted, Cut, Screwed, Glued, and Taped Wooden Blocks
Kate Pound, North Hennepin Community College

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A series of sets of wooden blocks all contain varying records of the order in which the blocks have been painted, cut, screwed, glued, and taped. These blocks are used in introductory geology courses at the college level as well as with elementary, middle- and high-school teachers in workshops. Many teachers have made their own blocks. The blocks are used at the start of a 'unit' on relative age. Students use critical reasoning to determine the relative order of the steps involved in fabrication of 'their' block – and realize that the blocks record a variety of orders; students have to work together to compare and discuss how their blocks differ, and the evidence they have used. The concepts of 'relative age' as inferred from geologic cross-sections can then be applied as students equate the block events with geologic events (e.g. cutting = faulting). This activity brings all students a 'real-life' experience of relative age in multiple dimensions, which improves their confidence and skills when they advance to working with geological cross sections.
1:30pm-2:40pm
Open Historical Geology Lab Manual
Amy Weislogel, West Virginia University

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I have generated the first draft of an open access lab manual for Historical Geology that includes 12 "investigations", which are a combination of skills training, guided inquiry and independent research. This lab manual was used in our GEOL 104:Earth Through Time course for the first time in 2021-2022 academic year; this course serves majors and Gen. Ed students in TA-taught lab sections. The manual was developed with support by a small internal grant from WVU Libraries and the Teaching and Learning Commons. Independent review of the lab manual is planned for 2022. Currently, the lab manual is focused on developing literacy and competencies in topics related to inferring geologic history from rocks, evaluating the fossil record for evidence of biological evolution and extinction, and reconstruction past environments and climate conditions from geologic proxies. Most of the lab investigations can be conducted as remote labs, although ideally most would be conducted in a lab setting with rock/fossil samples or in a computer lab or other setting where all students have computer access. This lab manual will have accompanying slides and exams that can be modified by the end user.
1:30pm-2:40pm
Evaluation of Mock Lab Reports to Improve Science Writing
Georgina Anderson, University of South Carolina-Columbia

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In this activity, upper-level science students critically examine three lab reports that contain many of the common problems instructors observe in student writing. These lab reports, written by the lab instructor, contain good examples of and problems with citations, organization, professional writing, displaying and interpreting data, etc. Students knew they were critiquing work that intentionally contains problems, creating a low-stakes environment where students could be highly critical without worrying about a peer's reaction as in a peer review exercise. Reading and discussing complete lab reports proved beneficial for students, as writing quality and, consequently, students' lab report grades, increased following this activity. To conclude this activity, students take on the role of the instructor and give feedback to the imaginary lab reports' authors, detailing positive traits and areas for improvement in comparison to the criteria specified in the provided rubric. Small prizes were given to the students who graded the mock lab reports most similarly to the instructor.
1:30pm-2:40pm
Curricular Pathways for Geohazard Learning
Beth Pratt-Sitaula, UNAVCO

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The EarthScope ANGLE Curricular Pathways offer four different ways to approach learning related to geohazard topic: Instrumentation, Plate Tectonics, Earthquake Impacts, and Community Resilience. The specific outcomes depend on the pathway.
1:30pm-2:40pm
Creative Final Project
Sabrina Brown, Defiance College

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I use this activity as a final project in my introductory courses. Students are asked to choose a topic covered during the course and develop a creative project surrounding this topic. Students are also required to write a short narrative addressing how their creative work relates to the course. Example projects include artwork, short stories, songs, movie trailers, lesson plans, and board games. The projects are graded on creativity, content accuracy, depth of thought, and design/craftsmanship.
1:30pm-2:40pm
You be the Isopleth!
Kristen Foley, Western Michigan University

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In a room where numbers 1-10 are written on index cards and scattered around, students physically align themselves around the room as an isopleth determined by the instructor. Learning outcomes are: Following the lesson, students will be able to define isopleths as lines of equal value on a map and be familiar with common isopleth types (for example, isobars, isotherms, etc.); Students will be able to determine the interval between isopleths; Using a map with isopleths, students will be able to determine values for given locations
1:30pm-2:40pm
Using the Simons CMAP data portal to investigate oceanographic processes
Sasha Seroy, University of Washington-Seattle Campus
Tansy Clay Burns, University of Washington-Seattle Campus

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This activity introduces students to the Simons Collaborative Marine Atlas Project (Simons CMAP) data portal as a way to compare data from three different ocean observing methods (ships, autonomous vehicles, and satellites). Students use the data portal to visualize real sea surface temperature data collected using these methods to compare the scientific application of each in terms of its benefits and limitations, temporal and spatial scales, and environmental changes that can be observed. Students compare data from these methods at two locations, one tropical and one polar, to encourage thinking about the scales over which sea surface temperature changes occur in both locations and which methods are appropriate for observing which changes and processes.