Teaching Demonstrations

Wednesday 12-2:30pm PT / 1-3:30pm MT / 2-4:30pm CT / 3-5:30pm ET Online
Teaching Demonstration Part of Teaching Demonstrations

Session Chair

Ryan Hollister, Turlock Unified School District

The teaching demonstration session will feature 12-minute teaching demonstrations, designed as 9 minute presentations followed by a 3 minute Q&A session, in sequence. The teaching demo schedule is below.

Session Connection Info

This session has already taken place.

12:18 PT / 1:18 MT / 2:18 CT / 3:18 ET
Websites for Teaching and Learning Identification of Minerals and Rocks in Introductory Physical Geology
Scott Brande, University of Alabama at Birmingham

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An abundance of digital media that exhibit minerals and rocks are available online. However, most of these media have not been designed and produced for typical laboratory-based learning activities and objectives that require observation, determination of properties, comparison with reference charts and tables, and finally a decision on identification by name. I created websites for each of the four material-based identification activities in a typical introductory physical geology laboratory course: minerals, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Each website is designed to provide digital media focused on the identification process. Content includes a simplified classification chart, Youtube videos that demonstrate how physical tests are done and observations are made, and a limited number of known minerals or rocks in a "bank" to which unknown samples are compared, and other material, such as links to online image archives and references. Samples include the most common unknowns. Videos show samples subjected to the same tests a student would perform in lab. Observing the videos and images enables a student to acquire nearly the same observational information as when manipulating a physical sample. Students may engage the identification process for minerals and rocks through these new websites, publicly available without charge.
12:31 PT / 1:31 MT / 2:31 CT / 3:31 ET
Utilizing Android Phones for NASA Relative Measurements
CONSTANCE MEADORS, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
Katina White, Forest Heights Middle school
Dr. Marico Bryant-Howe, University of Arkansas - Pulaski Technical College

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Phones have become a part of our lives. They are used to measure many physical activities and measurements such as heart rate. However, academia often bands the use of phones in the classroom. This activity is designed to help instructors and students embrace the phone is a scientific tool. It incorporates the use of the Android phone to integrate measurements systems that are useful to NASA. This includes converting the phone into unique, yet common, scientific devices. Instructors a will better understand how to integrate a mobile device into their daily lessons. Students will enjoy the application and opportunity to use their devices in the classroom.
12:44 PT / 1:44 MT / 2:44 CT / 3:44 ET
Raspberry Shake - "Dig Deeper into Seismology"
Gabriel Low, Mr.

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This lesson is the second lesson in Raspberry Shake's introductory lesson plan sequence and focuses on students' fundamental understanding of earthquakes, seismic waves, and how earthquake epicenters are located. The lesson begins with a short presentation about the concepts of how earthquakes start, the different types of seismic waves, and an explanation of how seismologists are able to identify earthquake epicenters through triangulation and picking P and S waves. Students are then directed to locator.raspberryshake.net, where they can practice picking earthquake epicenters using data from the Raspberry Shake Citizen Science Seismic Network. The lesson outcomes are that: Students gain a complete and hands-on understanding of how earthquake epicenters are located, and how seismic waves work in general.
1:00 PT / 2:00 MT / 3:00 CT / 4:00 ET
Community Science Integration for Undegraduates
Natasha Udu-gama, AGU
Kelly McCarthy, American Geophysical Union

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This activity will integrate the Thriving Earth Exchange approach to community science into an introductory level undergraduate Earth science class. Community science is defined as an approach to doing science by which communities and scientists partner to advance local priorities. The skill set demonstrated through this learning module will help to build capacity in community engagement for undergraduate students working in or adjacent to the Earth sciences. Through a series of exercises that include skill-building through active listening, a simulation of a four-phase approach to community science, and development of a project scope, undergraduate students will build a foundation to help them successfully integrate community engagement into their lab work or research. The demonstration will also highlight examples of how Thriving Earth Exchange community science Fellows have incorporated community science into undergraduate and graduate courses that they teach.
1:13 PT / 2:13 MT / 3:13 CT / 4:13 ET
Community Science Learning Module (K-12)
Kelly McCarthy, American Geophysical Union
Rajul Pandya, AGU
Melissa Goodwin, AGU

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The learning module includes a series of activities that facilitate skill building in community and civic engagement through the lens of community science. The practice of community science is defined as a way of 'doing science' by which communities and scientists work together to advance one or more local priorities. The Thriving Earth Exchange uses an established four-phase approach to enable community science projects that have resulted in tangible local impact in over 100 communities. The activity, aimed at high school students, will build on well-documented success of place-based learning by demonstrating the power of a community-first approach to science. This can serve as a stand-alone learning module or as a basis for a longer-term capstone in community-driven science led by the students. Participants will reflect on their community identity, practice active listening, and design a project scope that involves thoughtful integration of a community/local priority and scientific concept. It aligns with NGSS HS-ESS3-2 "Science knowledge indicates what can happen in natural systems - not what should happen. The latter involves ethics, values, and human decisions about the use of knowledge. Many decisions are not made using science alone, but rely on social and cultural contexts to resolve issues."
1:26 PT / 2:26 MT / 3:26 CT / 4:26 ET
Overcoming Narrative Challenges in Geosciences
Matthew Oliver, University of Delaware
Jonathan Cohen, University of Delaware

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One consequence of living in a highly connected world is that students are bombarded with geoscience information claiming to support or encourage particular attitudes or dispositions toward the natural world. These attitudes are portrayed as structured stories, each have a setting, problem, solution, villains and heroes that are often communicated along with geoscience information. This narrative challenge presses students to not only understand geoscience facts, but their own and others' reactions to them. Imagining a different set of circumstances or point of view in which people have different reactions to the same information is a particular kind of empathy known as "perspective taking". To address this problem, we will demonstrate a narrative exercise that encourages students to see the same geoscience data in the context of different narratives to be better geoscience communicators across different cultures. This activity is a classroom activity in a geoscience course that meets both natural science and diversity breadth requirements.
1:39 PT / 2:39 MT / 3:39 CT / 4:39 ET
Overcoming programming challenges in Geosciences
Jonathan Cohen, University of Delaware
Matthew Oliver, University of Delaware

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One consequence of living in a highly connected world is that students are bombarded with geoscience information claiming to be scientifically factual. One major challenge for students trying to determine the validity of these claims is their inability to find, access, and visualize primary geoscience datasets. Undergraduate students commonly lack the technical skills to find, access and visualize primary geoscience datasets that form the foundation of geoscience results. To remedy this problem, we will demonstrate an active learning pedagogy called "pair-programming", where students with little to no experience coding learn how to find, access, and visualize geoscience data sets. This demonstration is a video-based pair-programming activity to help students, with no prior experience, access and process data from various geoscience datasets. One of the students is the "driver" and the other is the "navigator". The navigator is mainly responsible for watching and verbally communicating the programming instructions from the video to the driver. The driver is mainly responsible for translating the navigator's instructions into syntax and inputting it into the computer. Students exposed to this pedagogy dramatically increase speed and comprehension to do complex computing tasks and visualize important geoscience data. They then carry these skills into subsequent computing tasks.
1:52 PT / 2:52 MT / 3:52 CT / 4:52 ET
A Middle School CER Argumentative Inquiry Lab as introduction to Relative Humidity
Katina White, Forest Heights Middle school
Dr. Marico Bryant-Howe, University of Arkansas - Pulaski Technical College
CONSTANCE MEADORS, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff

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I will demonstrate a CER Argumentative Inquiry lab that helps students construct their own definition of the relationship between air temperature and the amount of water the atmosphere can hold.
2:05 PT / 3:05 MT / 4:05 CT / 5:05 ET
Blue Crab Population in the Chesapeake Bay
Matt Heller, James Madison University

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This 20 minute activity introduces the concepts of reservoirs, stocks, and fluxes as they relate to natural systems. It consists of: 1) introducing key terms, 2) describing the significance of the Chesapeake Bay and the importance of the Blue Crabs to the local economy, 3) watching a short video describing a winter dredge survey that is conducted each year, and 4) examining 30 years of winter dredge survey data to answer relevant questions.
N/A
Course design: Integrating ecosystem approach, sustainability principles and scientific concepts in non-STEM curricula
Dr. Archana Sharma, Terraafont Consulting LLC

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A ten minutes of descriptive expository talk would be shared with the audience on designing a new course or retrofitting a current course to integrate ecosystem approach, sustainability principles and scientific concepts in non-STEM curricula. Example of curricula design would be shared. A method refined by the presenter, over the years, to design or retrofit curricula would be provided. Subsequently, the audience would participate in a course design activity, working on one of their courses or on samples provided by the presenter, thus applying the method into practice and making modifications as needed. The take-home outcome would be in terms of a method of curricula design and a retrofitted course design.