Cutting Edge > Courses > Environmental Geology > 2012 Workshop > Program
Tom Price Iron Ore Mine – Pilbara Desert. Image taken by K. Wiese.

Program

Weather: Bring layers of clothes, a rain jacket or wind shirt, probably hat and gloves for field trip days. Be prepared, dress for comfort. Could be anywhere between 40 and 85 degrees!

Thursday, May 31: Optional Activity Review Camp

Reminder: for this day, meals and snacks are not provided – suggestions on where to purchase these are provide below

8:00 AM Vans depart Grantree for MSU campus
Breakfast: options include GranTree Inn Restaurant; College Street Grille near the dorms; full food service is available in the Student Union.
8:30 -9:00 AM MSU – Earth Sciences labs Gaines Hall 043 – Introductions and overview of where we are in the review process
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Activity Review Camp for the 20 designated Reviewers. Location: on campus at MSU – Earth Sciences labs Gaines Hall.
Lunch: options include Student Union (cheap, quick, not too bad); Pizza, big subs, College Street Grille on College Street a block away; a good deli at Town and Country;.....

Dinner: we'll shuttle folks downtown—you're on your own to explore the "haute cuisine" of Bozeman Main Street

Friday June 1: Optional Activity Review Camp

Reminder: for this day, meals and snacks are not provided – suggestions on where to purchase these are provide below

8:00 AM Vans depart Grantree for MSU campus
Breakfast: options include GranTree Inn Restaurant; College Street Grille near the dorms; full food service is available in the Student Union.
8:30 -9:00 AM MSU – Earth Sciences labs Gaines Hall 043 – Updates on where we are in the review process
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM Activity Review Camp for the 20 designated Reviewers. Location: on campus at MSU – Earth Sciences labs Gaines Hall.
Lunch: options include Student Union (cheap, quick, not too bad); Pizza, big subs, College Street Grille on College Street a block away; a good deli at Town and Country;.....

6:00 pmAle Works on East Main for dinner (optional – everyone's welcome, and everyone's on their own dime) – Location: across the street from the Bozeman Library, far east end of downtown area, north side of street.

Saturday June 2

7:30 AM Optional Field Trip - Meet in GranTree Inn parking lot at 7:30 AM for continental breakfast; (Shuttle provided for participants staying in dorms)
8:00 AM Departure
8:00 AM-4:30 PM General itinerary: Madison Valley, Yellowstone Talc Mine overview, Hebgen Lake Earthquake area, water policy issues for the upper Missouri River basin; issues related to Yellowstone National Park (fire ecology, geothermal energy prospecting, snow mobiles, development adjacent to wilderness areas, habitat change....); return to Bozeman by 4:30 PM

  • What to bring: Warm, dry clothes. Day pack with your personal needs. Water bottle. Camera. Field notes. Sunglasses (let's be optimistic). Sturdy walking shoes—we will mostly be making road stops with only short hikes. But some of the areas may be a bit rubbly.
  • What we'll provide: lunch and snacks (sandwich buffet, make your own; chips, vegies, cookies; drinks). First aid kits (but bring your own needs, e.g. allergy medicine, epi pin,...). Water. Bug spray and sun screen. Field guides and portable library of references.

5:00-6:00 PM GranTree Inn, Reception and Ice breaker
6:00-7:00 PM Buffet Dinner
7:00-8:30 PM Round Table Discussions: Opportunities and Challenges in Teaching Environmental Geology

Including: What's on your mind? and Discussions of survey results.

Sunday June 3 Theme: WHAT do we teach in Environmental Geology?

7:30 Continental Breakfast; Sub Ballroom B-C

8:15-8:30 AM Sub Ballroom B-C, Charge of the Day, Daily Logistics
8:30-9:45 AM Sub Ballroom B-C, Roundtable Discussion of the book: Limits to Growth: The 30-Year Update by Donella Meadows, Dennis Meadows, and Jorgen Randers, 2004 – Chelsea Green Publishing. Round table conversations/jigsaw activity on teaching about the causes and limits of population growth emphasizing the importance and pedagogy strategies.
Devin Castendyk – Moderator/Leader – Facilitators: Cathy Connor, Lori Weeden, Kathryn Szramek, Julie Maxson, Suki Smaglik, and Katryn Wiese

9:45-10:00 Break

10:00 AM-10:55 AM Case Studies I – Sessions will introduce the SCIENCE that underlies the topic (~30 mins) followed by group discussion about how to effectively TEACH about that topic (~20 mins).
(Participants will choose one from these options)

11:05 AM-12:00 PM Case Studies II
(Participants will choose one from these options)

12:00-1:00 Lunch, SUB Ballroom B

1:00-1:55 PM Case Studies III
(Participants will choose one from these options)

2:05-3:00 PM Case Studies IV
(Participants will choose one from these options)

  • Anthropogenic Hazards: The Origins and Impacts of Mississippi Mud – Julie Maxson; Gaines Hall 145
  • Natural Hazards: VESUVIUS model – Winton Cornell; Gaines Hall 147 (withdrawn)
  • Policy and Societal Issues – Coal, China and International Climate Agreements (Acrobat (PDF) 6.3MB Jun3 12) – James Myers; Gaines Hall 047
  • Natural Resources: NETLOGO Reefs – Dennis Hubbard; Gaines Hall 140

3:00-3:15 Snack Break

3:15-4:15 PM Cross-cutting Issues in Teaching Environmental Geology I: Pedagogic Issues and Strategies: Presentations and group discussion – 3 different topics – each 10-15 min followed by whole-group discussion; Sub Ballroom C (discussion notes)

4:30-5:30 PM Cross-cutting Issues in Teaching Environmental Geology I: Pedagogic Issues and Strategies: Presentations and group discussion; SUB Ballroom C (discussion notes

  • Engaging urban students and underrepresented minorities – Lawrence Lemke
  • Online classes – Alex Manda
    http://essea.strategies.org
  • Teaching Interdisciplinary groups and Non-Majors – Dennis Hubbard

5:30 PM Daily Road Check

Monday June 4 Theme: Teaching Environmental Geology "In Your Backyard"

Field trip around Gallatin Valley stopping at 4 stations to experience local environmental issues, and methods for teaching Environmental Geology in the field. 4 stations will include: Idaho Pole Superfund Site, Landfill, Gravel Quarry Controversy, Zoning/Water issues

7:00-7:30 Grantree Inn, depart at 7:30; lunch at the Belgrade City Park; finish ~5:00 PM at Hyalite Lake for BBQ dinner (or at my house if the weather is bad).

7:30 AM Departure

8:00-5:00 A rolling tour through locales within a 20 mile radius of campus to explore areas and ideas about how to teach Environmental Geology "in your backyard." Topics/locations include: EPA Superfund/National Priority List site; development on slopes prone to mass wasting; local landfill; wetlands; sand and gravel quarry; developmental "sprawl" and zoning issues; flood plains; water rights (surface and groundwater); development adjacent to wildlands; watershed management issues.
Local field trip leaders: Dave Mogk, Bill Locke, Earl Griffith.

At each stop we will consider how this topic/location could be used for instructional purposes. We will organize discussion groups by van, and the individuals listed below will help lead discussions with these groups at each site and at the lunch stop on pedagogic aspects of teaching in the field such as field trip preparation, logistics, management, expectations, and "what" and "how" we might teach at each site. Leaders will provide their own experience and expertise and facilitate the sharing of group expertise and discussion.

  • Group 1: Shelley Jaye and Trent Garrison
  • Group 2: Duncan Foley and Cathy Connor
  • Group 3: Lawrence Lemke and Norlene Emerson
  • Group 4: Cynthia Fadem and Suki Smaglik

5:00 PM BBQ dinner at Hyalite Lake (or at Dave's house if the weather is bad)
Optional short hike to Palisades Falls while dinner is cooking.
Return to town early evening.

Tuesday June 5 Theme: HOW Do We Teach Environmental Geology - Strategies and Best Practices

7:30 Continental Breakfast, SUB Ballroom B

8:15-8:30 AM Charge of the Day, Daily Logistics; SUB Ballroom C

8:30-10:30 AM Go to Class 1: Do a Learning Activity (2 hour lab participation) – (Participants will choose one from these options)

  • "A River Runs Through It": an introduction to water quality and water resource awareness – Robin Humphreys; Gaines Hall 145
  • CO2 vs Temp (PowerPoint 4.5MB Jun3 12) – Ice Cores – Beth Caissie; Gaines Hall 050
  • Landfill Leak Test – Jeremy Shannon; Gaines Hall 047
  • Developing a small groundwater flow model (3-point model) for a geothermal borehole field – Klaus Neumann; Gaines Hall 147

10:45 AM-12:00 PM Go to Class 2: Do a Learning Activity (Panel of short – 5-20-minute – activities in lecture/discussion section) – (Participants will choose one from these options)

Waves and associated hazards: Gaines Hall 145

    • Tsunami – Marta Torres
    • Seismic Wave Resonance and Interference – Chris Lewis
    • Liquefaction Hazards (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 17kB Jun5 12) – Norlene Emerson

Getting your hands dirty: Gaines Hall 147

    • Magma Viscosity – Sara Mitchell
    • Geology Fun with Food! Plate Tectonics, Weathering, and Mining Techniques – Leah Joseph
    • Flooding – Julie Maxson

Looking closer: Gaines Hall 047

    • 'Sand Analysis – Tarin Weiss (Teaching Activity)
    • Identifying Geologic Hazards and Planning Your Escape – Carla Grandy
    • Playdough Geology – Lyn Gualtieri

Understanding equations and electrical charge: Gaines Hall 140

12:00-1:00 PM Lunch - SUB Ballroom B – Lunch-time informal sessions on topics – including:

  • Closure of Oil Sands Mines – Devin Castendyk
  • Textbooks

1:00-3:00 PM Share Fair: SUB Ballroom B
Posters or demonstrations and discussions of your favorite Environmental Geology teaching activity or strategy; participants circulate for informal demonstrations and discussions of teaching methods.

3:15-4:15 PM Assessment Panel: Aligning Learning Goals with Measures of Learning Outcomes (Acrobat (PDF) 758kB Jun5 12) – David McConnell Moderator/Leader and Sheila Roberts, Suki Smaglik; Sub Ballroom C

  • handout (Acrobat (PDF) 647kB Jun1 12)

4:30-5:30 PM Whole Group Reflection: Strategies, Best Practices; Round Table Discussions and Report Outs; Sub Ballroom C

Dinner: I-Ho's Korean (BBQ) Grill

7:00-9:00 PM Review Groups: What is left to do, How are we going to get there? Gap Analysis of what else do we need? Groups meet in Gaines Hall classrooms for evening discussion.

Chrysotile Tailings from a in Cassiar, British Columbia. Image taken by K. Wiese.

Wednesday June 6 Theme: Get to Work, Into the Streets

7:30 Continental Breakfast, SUB Ballroom B

8:15-8:30 AM Charge of the Day, Daily Logistics; SUB Ballroom C

8:30-10:00 AM Teaching Environmental Geology Across the Curriculum I; SUB Ballroom C

  • John McDaris – On the Cutting Edge Resources
  • Cathy Manduca and Dave McConnell – InTeGraTe
  • Jill Singer – Writing a good TUES proposal (NSF/DUE)
    TUES Proposal Preparation Template (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 158kB Jun6 12)
10:00-10:15 Break

10:15-10:45 AM Teaching Environmental Geology Across the Curriculum II; SUB Ballroom C

Exploration of strategies to teach Environmental Geology "vertically" in the Geoscience curriculum, and "horizontally" by getting Environmental Geology topics into other STEM courses – Dave Mogk Moderator/Leader

11:00 AM-2:00 PM Working Groups to develop web and shared resources. Prepare report out for "next steps." Preliminary suggested topics with some facilitators to include the following. Other topics will emerge according to participant interests and needs.

(working groups in spaces across campus; working lunch SUB Ballroom B)

  • Podcasts, Blogs, web video resource, and other visualizations – Tom Juster and Sian Proctor
  • Finding resources – equipment, accessibility, etc. – Lori Weeden and Gary Weissman
  • Organizing the course – best practices – including how much emphasis on engineering aspects, sustainability, natural vs anthropogenic hazards, background in physical geology, remediation
  • Textbooks, readers, case studies, data and models
  • Elevator talks on key concepts (like climate change)
  • Helping students find connections with jobs, personal accountability, policies, health-issues, emergency services and preparing, economics, politics

2:00-3:00 PM Town Hall Meeting: NEXT STEPS; SUB Ballroom C

  • Report outs from working groups
  • Opportunities through InTeGrate
  • Follow on activities GSA, AGU
  • Writing articles
  • Workshop Evaluation

3:00 PM Departures or go on short hike if you're staying.

Thursday June 7: Optional Field Trip

7:00-7:30 AM Meet in GranTree Inn parking lot at 7:30 AM for continental breakfast; (Shuttle provided for participants staying in dorms)
7:30 AM Departure
MORNING: Golden Sunlight Gold Mine (near Whitehall MT – mining, processing, environmental reclamation)
LUNCH: Butte (town visitor center – reclaimed wetland from mine tailings)
AFTERNOON: Butte Pit (1 mile wide, across, and deep – filling with a billion of gallons of water – pH 2.8 and heavy metals) – Walkerville (original underground workings of original mine + tailings – Gold, Silver, + Copper – originally 10,000 miles of underground workings, then switch to open pit) – Silver Bow Creek and largest Superfund site in the U.S. (stream bed laced with heavy minerals – $1 million per mile to reclaim).

Butte Mining and Remediation Overview (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 25.4MB Jun20 12) by Joe Griffin and Nick Tucci

~5:30 PM Dinner Fred's Mesquite Grill (great burgers, also vegie options) (on your own dime).
~8:00 PM Return to Bozeman

  • What to bring: Warm, dry clothes. Day pack with your personal needs. Water bottle. Camera. Field notes. Sunglasses (let's be optimistic). Sturdy walking shoes—we will mostly be making road stops with only short hikes. But some of the areas may be a bit rubbly.
  • What we'll provide: lunch and snacks (sandwich buffet, make your own; chips, vegies, cookies; drinks). First aid kits (but bring your own needs, e.g. allergy medicine, epi pin,...). Water. Bug spray and sun screen. Field guides and portable library of references.




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