InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Interactions between Water, Earth’s Surface, and Human Activity > Instructor Stories
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Instructor Stories and Adaptations

These resources describe how the module was adapted for use in different settings. We hope these stories inspire your own use of the module and give you insight into how to adapt the materials for your classroom.

Susan DeBari
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Susan DeBari[creative commons]
Provenance: Susan DeBari, Western Washington University
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Sue DeBari: Geology and Everyday Thinking at Western Washington University - This module was used as one of the final modules in a quarter-long course developed specifically for pre-service elementary teachers. The course is part of a yearlong constructivist science sequence (no lecture) that begins with 'Physics and Everyday Thinking', and may be followed by similar quarter-long courses in biology, geology, and chemistry. This course focuses on transfer of matter and energy in Earth systems while developing the process of doing science. The previous modules in the course were about solid Earth processes driven by Earth's internal energy, so this module was a way to purposefully focus on surface processes driven by the hydrologic cycle (Sun-driven) and link them back to those solid Earth processes. It was also a way to help students think about how humans interact with the hydrologic cycle and surface processes. The course meets three times per week in two-hour increments, and has a maximum of 24 students per class. The five units were completed in 5 class periods (10 hours).

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Photo of Dr. Kyle Gray[creative commons]
Provenance: Kyle Gray, University of Northern Iowa
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Kyle Gray: Investigations into Earth and Space Science at the University of Northern Iowa - This module was used in a semester-long Earth and space science content course designed specifically for students with a declared major in elementary education or early childhood education and who are working toward a minor in science education. Before taking this course, all students completed a prerequisite semester-long content course that covered material from geology, meteorology, and astronomy. To graduate, students are also required to take two similar introductory courses in physical science and life science. Investigations into... used a spiraled approach by revisiting many of the concepts covered in the previous class at a deeper level and introducing new concepts such as the effects of large asteroid impacts on humanity and identifying hazards from volcanoes and earthquakes and predicting the impacts on local communities. Both classes were taught from a constructivist perspective in which the students interact with the target concepts using real-world data when possible. Each course met for five hours a week (1 hour and 50 minutes on Mondays and Wednesdays and 50 minutes on Fridays) in a laboratory setting with no scheduled lecture. The section of Investigations into... that piloted this module had only 15 students, which is smaller than most sections of this course. Because there is no lecture in this course, this module was implemented over a two-week period as part of a larger unit on surficial Earth processes.

Photo: Julie Monet
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Julie Monet[creative commons]
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Julie Monet: Concepts in Earth & Space Science at the California State University - Chico - The module was used over two weeks in an Earth and space science course designed for future elementary teachers. This is a required course for students who are primarily in the Liberal Studies program. There is a smaller population of students from the BA in Natural Sciences program. The lab component of the course meets twice a week; each class runs for 1 hour and 50 minutes. All lab sections have 24 students. In addition, students from all lab sections come together for a 50-minute lecture once a week. This module is not designed to be taught in a lecture format and therefore I only implemented the materials during lab. After the first time of teaching the module, I revised it to fit over a two-week time frame and used only Units 1-4, with each activity fitting within a 1-hour and 50-minute time frame.

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Additional Instructor Stories

Dr. Edith Davis: Using InTeGrate materials in GLY 2001 – Earth & Space Science 001, 002, and 003 at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Dr. Edith Davis, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Creating a Thirst for more knowledge about the Earth's Interface between Water, Earth's Surface and Human Activity. I used InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity > Unit 1: Hydrology Cycle Module to Enhance my Earth Science classes. One of the world's major challenge the management of fresh water. Fresh water is one of the most precious commodities on Planet Earth. The InTergrate Hydrology Cycle Module enable me to give the students a REAL WORLD Experience in the class room. Water is one of the most precious resources on Plant Earth and Nations will rise as well as fall partly based on their source of water."

Michelle A. Fisher: Using Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity in Biology for Majors at Three Rivers College
Michelle Fisher, Three Rivers Community College
Over a 6-week period, I incorporated the "Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity" module into the ecology section of my Biology for Majors course to allow students to assess the interdependence between the abiotic and biotic world. Through use of the module, the study of geosciences was connected to the study of ecology and to the grand challenge of river flooding that occurs in our region.

Rachel Pigg: Using InTeGrate Materials in Survey of Life at Presbyterian College
Rachel Pigg, Presbyterian College
My nonmajors biology students enjoyed the new content provided by three InTeGrate modules: (1) Interactions between Water, Earth's Surface, and Human Activity, (2) Climate of Change, and (3) A Growing Concern. Elements and exercises from all three were interleaved into existing course content, which greatly enhanced student engagement in lecture and lab.

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »