Round Table Discussions

Afternoon Round Tables are open to all participants registered for that day (not reserved ahead of time). Join the email list to receive updates.

Tuesday - Session I

Strategies for Course Embedded Research

Moderator: Prajukti Bhattacharyya, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

Two recent reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS 2015, 2017) highlight the cognitive and affective benefits of embedding aspects of authentic research in undergraduate courses on a broad student population, especially in the STEM disciplines. This round table discussion will cover how various elements of research, such as formulating a research question, collecting, analyzing, and synthesizing data, and presenting results visually and/or orally can be implemented in classrooms.

Developing Spatial Thinking Skills

Moderators: Reginald Archer, Tennessee State University; Solomon Haile, Tennessee State University; Mark Abolins, earthsiteAGS.com; Clement Akumu, Tennessee State University

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

This roundtable will explore ways to improve teaching and learning spatial thinking skills. Participants are encouraged to share their experiences and discuss innovative ways to incorporate spatial thinking in the geosciences. The roundtable will explore how geospatial or geographic information systems and sciences (GIS) help to analyze not just where, but when, why, and how questions for holistic problem solving. From sketching some lines on paper to engaging with geospatial technologies, spatial thinking skills can be further developed and inspired by incorporating some basic concepts of spatial reasoning and spatial literacy in general. We hope to transform spatial thinkers to informed spatial thinkers and decision makers who are better equipped to investigate issues and phenomenon interconnected in time and space.

Getting the Most Out of your TA Experience

Moderator: Brendan Hanger, Oklahoma State University-Main Campus

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

Your experience as a teaching assistant (TA) can be one of the most important you experience during graduate, and can be fundamental in deciding whether or not you enjoy teaching later in your career. This discussion will provide an opportunity to learn about some strategies for making the most of your TA, regardless of your ultimate goals. Whether you are just beginning as a TA and want to improve your teaching, or are more experienced and want to jump beyond the basic lab TA role there will be strategies you can use to get more out of the experience. We will discuss the experiences of each other and share strategies.

Applying Models of Diversity to Improve Geoscience Curricula and Programs

Moderator: Eric Riggs, Texas A & M University

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

Increasing diversity, access and success of students and faculty in the geosciences has been a sustained priority of the geoscience education community over recent decades. The collected experiences of these programs has allowed the development of overarching models that explain and predict the operational factors and components critical to the attraction and success of underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. This roundtable discussion will highlight a few recently published models of access and success in the geosciences, including multicontext theory, macrosystems models, Jolly trilogy model, and input-environment-output models. This session will explore the particular strengths and insights offered by these approaches and how individual departments and geoscience programs can use them to enhance program outcomes.

Teaching Geoscience in Laboratory Settings

Moderator: Mark Schmitz, Boise State University

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

The geosciences utilize a wide array of instrumental and analytical tools and technology to identify, quantify and explore Earth materials, and test hypotheses using their physical and chemical properties. The laboratory setting can thus provide a rich environment for student learning. This round table discussion will facilitate conversations about the knowledge, skills, and habits of mind that are particularly pursued and strengthened while teaching in the laboratory setting or with laboratory-derived data. Desired outcomes are the exploration of our shared experiences, as well as an inclusive prospectus of 'analytical thinking,' as steps toward codifying the best practices for achieving learning goals 'in the laboratory.'

Implicit Bias

Moderator: Catherine Riihimaki, Princeton University

Round Table

Tuesday, July 16 | 3:00-4:15pm

Implicit bias describes when we have attitudes towards people or associate stereotypes with them without our conscious knowledge. Cognitive science research shows that everyone has implicit biases, sometimes in surprising ways, and that these biases affect how we understand situations, make decisions, and behave. This round-table discussion will focus on how to recognize different forms of implicit bias and how to address the ways that these biases manifest themselves in our teaching and other professional responsibilities.

Building Successful University-K-12 Partnerships

Moderator: Chris Vanags, Vanderbilt University

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

With the recent shift in federal funding priorities, universities have a tremendous opportunity to engage with their local k-12 schools. Though the experience is incredibly rewarding and enriching for both parties, it can also be challenging to navigate an environment that does not resemble academia. In this roundtable, we will discuss strategies for connecting with local schools, focusing on the development and evaluation of implementation strategies and highlighting potential funding opportunities and dissemination plans for building and maintaining an effective partnership.

Designing and Implementing a Multi-institution Field Program for 2YC and 4YC Students

Moderator: Becca Walker, Mt. San Antonio College

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Interested in offering extended field experiences for your introductory-level students? Is your institution interested in adding a greater diversity of field projects to its existing geology field camp? This roundtable will provide an opportunity to discuss ideas for developing and executing field programs that bring together students and faculty from several institutions. We will use the ESTEM (Environmental STEM--NSF-Geopaths) project, a field and career preparation program for students from College of the Atlantic, University of San Francisco, and Mt. San Antonio College, as a case study for the conversation. In 2017 and 2018, approximately 40 undergraduates from COA, USF, and Mt. SAC completed geology, geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology field projects in the Sierras and interacted with local environmental professionals to learn about careers in the environmental sector. We will discuss some of the barriers that may accompany implementing a multi-institutional field collaboration, provide examples of ESTEM field projects and assessment strategies, and take a look at changes in ESTEM students' career interests and environmental skill sets. Please attend this roundtable if you would like to share your experience with collaborative undergraduate field programs or are interested in finding partner institutions for a future field program.

Friday - Session II

Using Lecture Tutorials to Make Classes More Student-centered

Moderators: Karen Kortz, Community College of Rhode Island and Jessica Smay, San Jose City College

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Lecture Tutorials are a method to increase student engagement in introductory geoscience courses. They are easy-to-implement worksheets focusing on misconceptions and difficult topics that students complete in groups during breaks in the lecture. In this roundtable, we will discuss best practices when using Lecture Tutorials, and participants will leave with concrete strategies to implement them in their courses. To provide a rich discussion, we welcome participants who are new to Lecture Tutorials and those who have previously used them.

Strategies for Using Community Developed Big Data Sets in Teaching

Moderator: Mark Uhen, George Mason University
Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Big has become ubiquitous in our society and easy to access via the Internet. Many government and non-governmental organizations regularly collect, process, and serve up vast quantities of scientific data to the world. As these data become more available, they can be used to craft activities for students that mirror those being done with these data by the scientists themselves. At the same time they can be used to give students a sense of their place in the larger world by focusing on a particular geographic region, or scientific problem relevant to the students. We will discuss various data sources and approaches to these data that can be used to achieve these kinds of learning goals.

Being Teaching Faculty at a Research Focused Institution

Moderator: Cody Kirkpatrick, Indiana University-Bloomington

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Teaching faculty play an increasing role in carrying out the teaching mission at many research universities. In 2015, approximately 40 percent of full-time academic positions were non-tenure-track, up from 28 percent in 1995 (AAUP 2017). We frequently carry out our share of this mission while operating under very different sets of promotion guidelines, rights, and expectations than our research-tenured colleagues. This round table will feature open discussion on some of the challenges and rewards of careers in teaching at research-oriented institutions. Those who already hold such a position are welcome to share their experiences, and those interested in pursuing such a position are especially encouraged to attend.

Impostor Syndrome

Moderator: Sharon Browning, Baylor University

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Imposter syndrome is a perception of inadequacy, self-doubt, or fraudulence often experienced by even the highest achievers. Left unchallenged, it may hinder confidence, career development, or relationships. This roundtable discussion will address common causes, challenges, and strategies for addressing imposter syndrome.

Teaching Volcanology

Moderator: Paul Ashwell, University of Toronto Mississauga

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

Volcanology is an exciting and engaging topic within Earth Sciences. It is rich with opportunities for students to learn about volcanoes and their processes through visual and interactive means. This discussion will focus on innovative methods of teaching volcanology; in lectures, laboratory or field settings; for use in Undergraduate and Graduate teaching, Secondary (K-12) education and outreach; and as a means of engaging students in Earth Sciences. We encourage discussions on successful methods, on problems met, or from questions arising about the teaching of volcanology. Whether you teach volcanology at beginner, intermediate or advanced levels, or are interested in incorporating volcanology content for the first time, we welcome you to this roundtable discussion.

A Closer Look at the Development of a New OER Historical Geology Textbook

Moderator: Callan Bentley, Northern Virginia Community College

Round Table

Friday, July 19 | 1:30-2:45pm

A group of Virginia 2YC educators have received a grant to develop a new introductory-level Historical Geology textbook that will live online as an open educational resource. We would like to share a progress report on this effort so far, including our draft Table of Contents and some sample modules, and seek input from the community about the topics covered, the approach, and peer reviewing the results. We also seek willing instructors at both the 2YC and 4-year university level who are interested in piloting the result in spring 2020.


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