Cutting Edge > Topics > Geodesy > Teaching Activities > Earthquake Investigation Workshop: Shake, Rattle, & Rock

Earthquake Investigation Workshop: Shake, Rattle, & Rock

Daniel P Murray
,
University of Rhode Island
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This activity has benefited from input from faculty educators beyond the author through a review and suggestion process.

This review took place as a part of a faculty professional development workshop where groups of faculty reviewed each others' activities and offered feedback and ideas for improvements. To learn more about the process On the Cutting Edge uses for activity review, see http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/review.html.

This activity was selected for the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Collection

Resources in this top level collection a) must have scored Exemplary or Very Good in all five review categories, and must also rate as “Exemplary” in at least three of the five categories. The five categories included in the peer review process are

  • Scientific Accuracy
  • Alignment of Learning Goals, Activities, and Assessments
  • Pedagogic Effectiveness
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For more information about the peer review process itself, please see http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/review.html.



This page first made public: Dec 6, 2011

Summary

This workshop is part of an NSF-funded effort to provide professional development to STEM teachers in Rhode Island. In this activity, students will make "earthquakes" using a simple model, the earthquake machine. We have added force and distance sensors to the machine, and linked them (via GOLINKS) to new new software, that allows students to graph and analyze their data. Students will evaluate the hypothesis that although earthquake patterns can be observed, the exact time and size of an earthquake cannot be predicted. Students then apply these insights to predicting earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, and estimating the magnitude of earthquakes on ancient faults in the region.

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Context

Audience

This 2.5 day workshop investigates provides MS & HS teachers with information about plate tectonics and earthquakes. It is geared to standards and Grade Span Expectations in RI. Over the next five years, most RI science teachers will have taken this, or similar, workshops and implemented them in their classes.

Skills and concepts that students must have mastered

Ideally, all teachers would have a basic understanding of math and the physical sciences, akin to a first-year geoscience major. However, we find that backgrounds range from VERY little science to M.SC in sciences. Thus we try to adapt the workshop so as to provide benefit to all. And, since the intent is for them to incorporate workshop materials in their own teaching, we also discuss how materials can be adapted to their curricula.

How the activity is situated in the course

The activity represents roughly 1/3 of the course. After an introduction to faults and earthquakes, teachers construct an EQ machine and use it to develop modes of faulting. Next, they go into the field to test these models.

Goals

Content/concepts goals for this activity

Students will learn about the physics behind EQ, the extent to which EQ can be predicted, and the recognition and interpretation of faults

Higher order thinking skills goals for this activity

The course focuses on developing the ability to formulate hypotheses, construct models of geologic phenomena and test them against real data, the interpretation of fault & EQ images, and the the analysis of visual-spatial data, such as LIDAR and GPS. The participants also learn how to teach this material in a discovery-based mode.

Other skills goals for this activity

Participants develop skills in the following areas: 1) Construction of models of geologic phenomena, 2) Use of probes (i.e., Vernier & Passcode force and distance sensors that transfer their data to computers for analysis), 3) operation of analytical equipment as part of modeling, 4) working in groups

Description of the activity/assignment

Students will make "earthquakes" using a simple model, the earthquake machine. It is patterned on the EQ machine described by Ross Stein, Michelle Hall-Wallace, and others. References are given below. We have added force and distance sensors to the machine, and linked them (via GOLINKS) to new new software, that allows students to graph and analyze their data. All SW will be freely available. Students will evaluate the hypothesis that although earthquake patterns can be observed, the exact time and size of an earthquake cannot be predicted. Students then apply these insights to predicting earthquakes on the San Andreas fault, and estimating the magnitude of earthquakes on ancient faults in the region.

Determining whether students have met the goals

Summative and formative evaluation of the activity include questionnaires, observation of teachers incorporating the workshop pedagogy into their MS & HS classes, improvement in student scores on standardized tests, and increase in the number of students choosing STEM careers.

More information about assessment tools and techniques.

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Other Materials

Supporting references/URLs

USGS Stress Triggering and Earthquake & Volcano Deformation Group (Menlo Park, California) - Background information, teaching animations and models, and other teaching resources for teaching about earthquakes.

How can you model earthquakes in the classroom? - an activity from IRIS on building an earthquake machine.

Hubenthal, Michael; Braile, Larry; Tabor, John. (2008) Redefining earthquakes and the earthquake machine: students use the Earthquake Machine Lite to refine their ideas about the causes of earthquakes. The Science Teacher.

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