InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Cli-Fi: Climate Science in Literary Texts > Instructor Stories
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
showLearn More
These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »
How to Use »

New to InTeGrate?

Learn how to incorporate these teaching materials into your class.

  • Find out what's included with each module
  • Learn how it can be adapted to work in your classroom
  • See how your peers at hundreds of colleges and university across the country have used these materials to engage their students

How To Use InTeGrate Materials »
show Download
The instructor material for this module are available for offline viewing below. Downloadable versions of the student materials are available from this location on the student materials pages. Learn more about using the different versions of InTeGrate materials »

Download a PDF of all web pages for the instructor's materials

Download a zip file that includes all the web pages and downloadable files from the instructor's materials

Instructor Stories

Jennifer Hanselman
Hide Caption
Jennifer Hanselman[creative commons]
Provenance: Jennifer Hanselman, Westfield State University
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Jennifer Hanselman: Cli-Fi at Westfield State University. The module was taught in a graduate level climate change course in a class of approximately 12 students. The majority of the students were practicing teachers, working to obtain a masters degree. The course was taught entirely online, therefore the module was adapted to that format. We implemented the module during the 9th week of the semester and took three weeks to complete. We utilized online discussion boards, assignment links for homework, and file uploads for the background content.

Oches photo
Hide Caption
Oches photo for instructor stories[creative commons]
Provenance: Rick Oches, Bentley University
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Rick Oches: Cli-Fi at Bentley University. I used Cli-Fi in my Science of Sustainability class, a general education science elective with 24 students, most of whom were business majors. The class met twice weekly for 75 minutes, and module components were incorporated as a combination of in-class activities and homework assignments over a two week period. Additional class time was spent prior to the module discussing Earth's climate system and the science of climate change, so students began with some climate change understanding. The module summative assessment was completed as part of a take-home final exam.

Sliko_China
Hide Caption
Sliko_China[creative commons]
Provenance: Jennifer Sliko, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Jennifer Sliko: Cli-Fi at Penn State Harrisburg - Physical Geology. I used this module in my undergraduate Physical Geology class of 40 students, primarily civil engineering majors (and a few petroleum engineering majors). The students in this class are primarily sophomores and juniors, and most of the students are considered traditional students. I taught this module in the last ¼ of the semester. Before doing this module, the students had previously learned about plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, minerals and the three rock types, weathering, soils, groundwater, and rivers, but we had not covered climate change. The summative assessment was used as a homework assignment.

Jennifer also piloted materials in her Planet Earth course.

Jennifer Sliko: Cli-Fi at Penn State Harrisburg - Planet Earth I also used this module in my undergraduate Planet Earth class of 35 students, primarily non-science majors. The students in this class are from all grade levels (freshman to seniors). Most of the students are traditional students, but about 25% of the students would be considered "non-traditional" (i.e., returning students). I taught this module about half-way through the semester. Before doing this module, the students had previously learned about hypothesis testing and the scientific method, groundwater, rivers, and plate tectonics. The students also wrote an opinion paper on hydraulic fracturing in Pennsylvania before we started this module. The summative assessment was used as a homework assignment.

Laura Wright
Hide Caption
A photo of me[creative commons]
Provenance: Laura Wright, Western Carolina University
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Laura Wright: Cli-Fi at at Western Carolina University The module was taught as a component of my African Literature graduate seminar, made up of eight students. The seminar met once per week for three hours over the course of fifteen weeks. The students in my class are all pursuing MAs in English with various concentrations: literature, professional writing, or rhetorical and composition. Two are high school teachers, and three others teach college-level composition courses. I introduced much of the climate change science materials early in the semester and spent very little time on the sections of the module that focus on literary terminology and rhetorical analysis, because, as graduate students, my class was already very familiar with those aspects of the module. The summative assessment was given during the final exam period.

Already used some of these materials in a course?
Let us know and join the discussion »

Considering using these materials with your students?
Get pointers and learn about how it's working for your peers in their classrooms »

These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »