InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Map your Hazards! > Unit 3: Translating the Message
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Unit 3: Translating the Message

Brittany Brand (Boise State University), Pamela McMullin-Messier (Central Washington University), Melissa Schlegel (College of Western Idaho)

These materials have been reviewed for their alignment with the Next Generation Science Standards as detailed below. Visit InTeGrate and the NGSS to learn more.

Overview

In this unit, students communicate the results of their research to their classmates and the community, adopting the stance of a particular stakeholder, and make recommendations for improving community preparedness.

Science and Engineering Practices

Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information: Communicate scientific and/or technical information (e.g. about a proposed object, tool, process, system) in writing and/or through oral presentations. MS-P8.5:

Engaging in Argument from Evidence: Respectfully provide and/or receive critiques on scientific arguments by probing reasoning and evidence, challenging ideas and conclusions, responding thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, and determining additional information required to resolve contradictions. HS-P7.3:

Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions: Design, evaluate, and/or refine a solution to a complex real-world problem, based on scientific knowledge, student-generated sources of evidence, prioritized criteria, and tradeoff considerations. HS-P6.5:

Disciplinary Core Ideas

Natural Hazards: Mapping the history of natural hazards in a region, combined with an understanding of related geologic forces can help forecast the locations and likelihoods of future events. MS-ESS3.B1:

Developing Possible Solutions: When evaluating solutions, it is important to take into account a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics, and to consider social, cultural, and environmental impacts. HS-ETS1.B1:

Performance Expectations

Engineering Design: Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts. HS-ETS1-3:

This material was developed and reviewed through the InTeGrate curricular materials development process. This rigorous, structured process includes:

  • team-based development to ensure materials are appropriate across multiple educational settings.
  • multiple iterative reviews and feedback cycles through the course of material development with input to the authoring team from both project editors and an external assessment team.
  • real in-class testing of materials in at least 3 institutions with external review of student assessment data.
  • multiple reviews to ensure the materials meet the InTeGrate materials rubric which codifies best practices in curricular development, student assessment and pedagogic techniques.
  • review by external experts for accuracy of the science content.

This activity was selected for the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Collection

Resources in this top level collection a) must have scored Exemplary or Very Good in all five review categories, and must also rate as “Exemplary” in at least three of the five categories. The five categories included in the peer review process are

  • Scientific Accuracy
  • Alignment of Learning Goals, Activities, and Assessments
  • Pedagogic Effectiveness
  • Robustness (usability and dependability of all components)
  • Completeness of the ActivitySheet web page

For more information about the peer review process itself, please see http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/review.html.



This page first made public: Oct 20, 2014

Summary

Students will identify potential stakeholders and assess the importance of communication and interaction among these groups to make recommendations on how to define and develop prepared communities.

Learning Goals

  • Students will identify potential stakeholders (e.g. individuals, social groups, scientists, community planners, emergency managers, decision makers, etc.) who would have an interest in or benefit from their assessments of hazards and vulnerabilities. Optional: Invite community stakeholders to attend and offer feedback or ask them to speak to the class.
  • Students will make a general list of recommendations for preparedness, resource allocation and city planning to promote building a better prepared and more resilient community (these can be specific to a particular stakeholder group).
  • Students (or groups of students) will choose a specific stakeholder to communicate their findings and recommendations in a hypothetical situation (potential forms can be a speech, written report, poster or PowerPoint presentation).

Context for Use

Note to instructors: Hazard professionals are interested and may want to talk to your class about the relevance/importance of their surveys. Think ahead of the module in extending invitations to professionals, as time permits.

This final part of the module is where students synthesize their findings from the previous units essentially into an action plan. We suggest at least two dedicated class periods to work on the presentations as students will need time to practice and get feedback from their peers and the instructor.

Description and Teaching Materials

Please note: We suggest that instructors give the students 1–2 minutes to discuss and list potential stakeholders who may be interested in this data (formative assessment). This can segue into an introduction on the role of stakeholders in disaster mitigation before moving into presentations:

Introduction to Stakeholders (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 417kB Oct28 14)

Unit 3 Rubric (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 23kB Oct19 14)


Activity 3:

This activity combines the results from Units 1 and 2. Each student group will be assigned a different stakeholder by the instructor (either "general public" or "expert") with whom they will hypothetically (1) share the results of the mapping exercise and survey results, and (2) make recommendations for building stronger community resilience.

Groups will begin by making a list of recommendations for preparedness, resource allocation and city planning to promote building a more resilient community. This list will focus on their specific stakeholder and will included in the presentation.

Finally, each group will prepare a 5–minute PowerPoint to present their findings and recommendations for their assigned stakeholder. The presentations will be given in class during the following class period. Students should be instructed to turn in a copy of their PowerPoint the day before the presentation.

Note to instructor: It is a good idea to invite stakeholders (either within the university or community) to attend during Activity 4. The students take it more seriously and they can also get valuable feedback on their presentations.

Activity 4:

Unit 3 Student Instructions (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 27kB Oct19 14)

Students will give their presentations to the class. The class and instructor will grade the groups of students using the rubric. Finally, instructors will give students a short, post-module assessment to gauge student engagement, interest and degree of learning from participation in the module.

Post-Module Quiz


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Teaching Notes and Tips

Be sure to allow enough time for students to practice their presentations for peer review and instructor advice.

Assessment

Unit 3 Rubric (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 23kB Oct19 14)

Post-Module Quiz


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The class will finish with an anonymous reflective assessment assigned on the last day of the module.

References and Resources

An example of an organization that connects stakeholders with risks and vulnerabilities: Assessments of Impacts and Adaptations to Climate Change.

World Economic Forum 2011 Report on proposals for public/private stakeholder solutions : A Vision for Managing Natural Disaster Risk.

Journal Article: Adaptive governance and resilience: the role of multi-stakeholder platforms in disaster risk reduction.

Journal Article: Patterson, Olivia, Frederick Weil, and Kavita Patel. "The Role of Community in Disaster Response: Conceptual Models." Population Research Policy Review (2010): 29: 127-141.

FEMA: Community Emergency Response Teams and FEMA Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.


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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »