InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society > Assessment
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Assessment of Course Goals

Student performance will be assessed using a variety of active and traditional assessment methods. Graded weekly activities will include labs using Google Earth images of coastlines, data displayed on Google Earth, LIDAR data of coastal topography before and after storms and tsunami, information from publicly accessible media, and information used by coastal planners and policy makers in making decisions about the coastal zone. There will be a capstone project that will integrate several of these data sets in a systems thinking framework. More information on the Capstone assignment is available in this PowerPoint (PowerPoint 2007 (.pptx) 118kB Oct11 16).

Knowledge is tested using weekly quizzes. Students will be required to reflect in weekly blogs. The final grades in the pilot implementations were determined as follows: Weekly quizzes (15%); Weekly labs (40%); Weekly blog discussions (10%); Capstone project (35%).

Note: All assessments below are linked to the student materials containing the assessment.

Course Assessments

Section 1

Module 1: The Societies and Economics of Coastal Regions

Module 2: A Global Glance of the Geology of Coastal Landscapes

Module 3: Coastal Systems: Landscapes and Processes

Capstone Stage 1

Section 2

Module 4: Understanding Sea-Level Change

  • Formative Assessment Part 1: Interactive Earth asks the students to work with visualization tools to evaluate models of short- and long-term sea-level change in the form of tides, storm surge, and longer-term sea level rise. Students will be able to toggle different scenarios and evaluate spatio-temporal implications of different parameters of the coastline and various physical parameters. Students will then complete three multiple choice/ranking questions to demonstrate their abilities to apply critical concepts.
  • Formative Assessment Part 2: Sea-Level Rise for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida focuses on the use of a GIS-based data visualization tool to explore the real impact (spatial range) of Hurricane Katrina's storm surge, and various sea-level rise scenarios from 1 to 6 feet. Students will interact with different base maps (satellite imagery, street maps, and terrain or topographic maps), and population distribution maps to make assessments about the real and potential impacts of short- and long-term sea-level rise along the entire Gulf Coast region, and particularly on the Biloxi, Mississippi, region. Students complete nine multiple-choice questions.
  • Summative Assessment: Tide Gauge Data was designed to 1) help students learn how to access, plot, and analyze archival instrumental tide gauge data sets that they select from disparate regions around the globe, and 2) allow students to self-assess how sea level is changing regionally, and globally. Through this assessment, students develop individual data analysis skills, but more importantly, they are able to contribute to class learning outcomes by sharing their individual findings. Students' understanding of sea-level change can thus be developed through their own logic when presented with clear class aggregate data that show an overwhelming number of sites that show clear evidence of sea level rise. Moreover, given the learning outcomes focused on understanding coastal geology in Unit 1 (modules 2 and 3), students should have the background information to assess the geologic settings of their selected tide gauging station in order to better interpret why there are some sites that are showing asynchronous sea-level fall.
  • Unit 2, Module 4 rubric (Microsoft Word 2007 (.docx) 24kB Oct10 16)

Module 5: Coastal Catastrophes: Storms and Tsunamis

Module 6: Impacts on the Societies and Economics of Coastal Regions

Capstone Stage 2

Section 3

Module 7: Hard Structures and Coastal Modifications through Mimicking Natural Processes

Module 8: Managed Retreat/Multi-Layered Protection

Module 9: Smart Building

Capstone Stage 3

Section 4

Module 10: Vulnerability to Coastal Hazards

Module 11: Tsunami and Storm Surge Policy

Module 12: Sea-Level Rise Policy

Capstone Stage 4 (Final Stage)

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »