InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society > Instructor Stories
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Instructor Stories and Adaptations

These resources describe how the module was adapted for use in different settings. We hope these stories inspire your own use of the module and give you insight into how to adapt the materials for your classroom.

Yarnell cropped
Tim Bralower
Tim Bralower and Brent Yarnal: Coastal Processes at Penn State Main Campus: This was a full semester blended course: lecture, reading, and video materials for weekly modules were fully online, but our students did the formative assessments and summative assessments with computers in the classroom. Nine of the students were geography majors, two were Earth science majors, and one was undeclared. The course works well in those majors, but could also serve as a general education science course.

Photo of Dr. Cornell using GPR at Wallops Island
Sean Cornell: Coastal Processes at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania: This blended course was offered to non-science majors as a three-credit course that met three times per week for a full 15-week semester. The first meeting each week focused on discussion of material to be covered that week as well as topics leftover from the previous week. The second meeting each week was devoted to completion of formative assessments ,and the third meeting was devoted to the completion of summative assessments.

Dr. Mark Kulp cropped
Ioannis Georgiou, University of New Orleans cropped
Mark Kulp, Dinah Maygarden, and Ioannis Georgiou: Coastal Processes at University of New Orleans: This 15-week course was offered to science and non-science majors; however, the majority of the students who took the course were Earth science majors within our department. The course was presented as a blended course wherein students were expected to read all of the online material on their own but attended class meetings twice per week to discuss topics and concepts, work on assessments, and take quizzes and exams. During most class meetings all three of the instructors were present to address student issues.

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Also Related to Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society

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May 8 2017 Service to communities and earth advocacy empowers students and faculty as change agents. There are numerous approaches to introduce these topics, but integrating them into the curriculum and campus ethos takes sustained effort. This webinar will provide examples and strategies to incorporate these topics into your course, program, or campus. Sarah Fortner, the Wittenberg University Implementation program leader and A Growing Concern module co-author, will provide strategies for partnering with local experts to tackle community challenges or to advocate for policy change. She will highlight a course and programmatic approach centered around collecting or analyzing data. Sean Cornell, the Shippensburg University Implementation program leader and Coastal Processes, Hazards, and Society course co-author, will discuss the successes of the implementation program to integrate sustainability into general education curriculum and enhance service-learning, co-curricular opportunities for students, and professional development opportunities for faculty. The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentations and 25 minutes of discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences regarding sustainability and serving communities.

Teaching About Natural Hazards and Risk
Aug 31 2016 Natural hazards and risk are topics that showcase the interactions between geological processes and society. Teaching about these topics helps students see the connections between geoscience and their daily lives. This webinar will highlight teaching strategies and examples ranging from in-class activities to capstone projects that help student consider the local and broader societal impacts of hazards, and will also provide models for mitigating risk. InTeGrate authors, Laurel Goodell, Lisa Gilbert, and Tim Bralower, will discuss their modules "Living on the Edge: Building Resilient Societies on Active Plate Margins", "Natural Hazards and Risks: Hurricanes", and "Coastal Processes, Hazards, and Society". The webinar will include 30 minutes of presentations and 25 minutes of discussion. Participants are encouraged to both ask questions of the presenters and discuss their own experiences teaching about hazards and risk.

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »