Project EDDIE > EDDIE > EDDIE Modules

Modules

Explore the EDDIE modules below. EDDIE modules are designed with an A-B-C structure to make them flexible and adaptable to a range of student levels and course structures. Each module page includes the activity goals, step-by-step instructions for implementing the activity, and presentations, handouts and data needed for each activity.

Ice fishing
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Ice fishing on the Kotzebue sound during the winter.[creative commons]
Provenance: Image available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ice_Fishing_(17919298873).jpg
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Lake Ice Phenology Module

This module was initially developed by C.C. Carey, J.L. Klug, and D.C. Richardson
Lakes are changing worldwide due to altered climate. Many lakes that were historically frozen in the winter are now experiencing fewer days of ice cover and earlier ice-off dates. In this module, students will explore long-term ice-off datasets from several lakes and use linear regression to make predictions about ice-off dates in the future. Explore this module...

Iceboat, sailing on Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire
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Iceboat, sailing on Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire[creative commons]
Provenance: Image available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:DN_ice_boat--Ice_Nine--Lake_Sunapee_NH.jpg
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Lake Metabolism Module

This module was initially developed by D.C. Richardson, J.L. Klug and C.C. Carey
Different lakes exhibit a range of catchment sizes, morphometry, and land use that contribute to differences in lake function. These functional differences mean that lakes vary in ecosystem services such as habitat quality and recreational value. In this module, students will explore high-frequency water quality datasets from several lakes around the world, graph high-frequency data, and use simple conceptual and mathematical models to calculate estimates of metabolism (gross primary production and respiration). Finally, students will compare metabolic rates across different lakes to examine gradients of eutrophication. Explore this module...

Fisherman on Lake Tanganyika, Mishemba Bay, Zambia.
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Fisherman on Lake Tanganyika, Mishemba Bay, Zambia.[creative commons]
Provenance: Image from Wikimedia Commons.
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Lake Mixing Module

This module was initially developed by C.C. Carey, J.L. Klug, and R.L. Fuller
Stratified lakes exhibit vertical gradients in organisms, nutrients, and oxygen, which have important implications for ecosystem structure and functioning. Mixing disrupts these gradients by redistributing these materials throughout the water column. Consequently, it is critical to understand the drivers of lake mixing and thermal stratification, especially because of the sensitivity of lake thermal conditions to altered climate. In this module, students will explore spatial and temporal patterns of lake mixing using high-frequency temperature data from lakes around the world. They will also explore how increases in air temperature affect thermal stratification by interpreting output from a lake model. Explore this module...

Lac du Milieu de Bastan
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Lac du Milieu de Bastan, shortly before sunset, Hautes-Pyrénées, France.[creative commons]
Provenance: Benh LIEU SONG; image available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lac_du_Milieu_de_Bastan_Hautes_Pyrénées_02_BLS.JPG
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Lake Modeling Module

This module was initially developed by C.C.Carey, S. Aditya, K. Subratie, and R. Figueiredo
Lakes around the globe are experiencing the effects of climate change. In this module, students will learn how to use a lake model to explore the effects of altered weather on lakes, and then develop their own climate scenarios to test hypotheses about how lakes may change in the future. Explore this module...

USGS Streamgage
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USGS employees installing a temporary stream gage near 13th Ave. and J Street, Cedar Rapids, IA (Photograph by Don Becker, USGS)[reuse info]
Provenance: Photograph by Don Becker, USGS
Reuse: This item is in the public domain and maybe reused freely without restriction.

Stream Discharge Module

This module was initially developed by N.E.Bader, T. Meixner, C.A. Gibson, C.M. O'Reilly, and D.N. Castendyk

Stream discharge is a fundamental measure of water supply in stream systems. Low discharge may cause problems with water supply and fish passage, while high discharge may mean flooding. In this module, students explore real-time stream discharge data available from the United States Geologic Survey. Students use this data to assess changes in discharge with time, calculate flood frequency, and see the effects of urbanization and flood control. Explore this module...

Confluence of rivers, Pittsburgh, PA
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Pittsburgh Point Park from the top of Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh, PA, showing the confluence of two rivers[creative commons]
Provenance: Henry C. Schmitt; image available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pittsburgh-Point.jpg
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Water Quality Module

This module was initially developed by D.N. Castendyk and C.A. Gibson

Water quality is a critical concept for undergraduate students studying Earth Sciences, Biology, and Environmental Sciences. Many of these students will be asked to assess the impacts of a proposed anthropogenic activities on human water resources and/or ecosystems as part of their future careers. This module engages students in exploring factors contributing to the variability of nitrate in surface waters; one of the most common contaminants found in US rivers. Students will utilize real-time nitrate data from the US Geological Survey to statistically evaluate water quality impacts and to identify their causes. Explore this module...

Soil
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Soil profile on Kilner Bank, cut during the construction of a passing place for lorries involved in the landfill of a nearby quarry.[creative commons]
Provenance: Chris Yeates. Image available via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:A_soil_profile_on_Kilner_Bank_-_geograph.org.uk_-_92677.jpg
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Soil Respiration Module

This module was initially developed by L.E. Nave, N. Bader, and J.L. Klug

Soils hold more carbon (C) than any other component of the terrestrial biosphere! In this module, students will explore high-frequency, sensor-based datasets documenting climate variables and the emissions of C (as CO2) from soils to the atmosphere, and learn about drivers and patterns of soil respiration. Explore this module...

Prarie Potholes
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Wetlands and their plants filter nutrients and chemicals from rainwater runoff, replenish groundwater aquifers, and provide habitat to numerous animal species. The hundreds of plant species found in and around wetlands are specially adapted to their environment. Photo by USFWS.[creative commons]
Provenance: USFWS Mountain-Prairie and accessed via Flickr.com
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Nutrient Loading Module

This module was initially developed by D.N. Castendyk,T. Meixner, and C.A. Gibson

Estimating nutrient loads is a critical concept for students studying water quality in a variety of environmental settings. In this module, students explore factors contributing to nitrogen loads that are transmitted down streams. They utilize real-time nitrate data from the US Geological Survey to calculate nitrate loads for several locations and investigate the interplay of concentration and discharge that contributes to the calculated loads. Explore this module...

ice core
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ice core[creative commons]
Provenance: NOAA http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/about-collage.html
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Climate Change Module

This module was initially developed by C.M. O'Reilly, D.C. Richardson, and R.D. Gougis

Scientists agree that the climate is changing and that human activities are a primary cause for this change through increased emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. In this module, students explore how climate is changing from the recent record. They then compare current patterns to pre-historic rates of change calculated from ice-core data, using their results to support whether or not human activity is likely to have influenced current climate change. Explore this module...

Installations at Auxiliary Seismic Station AS072 Spitsbergen Norway
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Seismic monitoring station in Norway. Photo courtesy of CTBTO.[creative commons]
Provenance: Photo from Official CTBTO, accessed via Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/40662521@N07/13287766774
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.

Spectral Seismology Module

This module was initially developed by D. S.Soule, M. Weirathmuller, G. Kroger, and R. Darner Gougis

This module that is based on a conceptual presentation of waveforms and filters. "Spectral Seismology" will engage students using seismic and acoustic signals available through Incorporated Research Institutes for Seismology (IRIS) in the manual manipulation of waveforms with the goal of developing students' ability to go beyond basic terminology. I hypothesize students completing "Spectral Seismology" will demonstrate: (1) The vocabulary needed to describe signals in the time and frequency domain; (2) The ability to conceptualize a waveform as the sum of separate frequency components; (30 The ability to relate a signal presented in the time domain to its conjugate in the frequency domain; (4) The ability to use a signal presented in either the time or frequency domain to develop an analysis plan and choose an appropriate filter. Explore this module...