CURE Examples


Results 1 - 10 of 18 matches

Molecular Parasitology
Paul Ulrich, Georgia State University
Of the approximately 1000 different proteins that populate eukaryotic mitochondria, ~50% have no known function. Molecular Parasitology is a course-based intensively engages undergraduates by investigating roles of uncharacterized, mitochondrial proteins in trypanosomatid parasites. Students utilize basic bioinformatics (subcellular localization, conserved domain prediction, BLAST, secondary structure) to predict protein function followed by construction and transfection of GFP-fusion constructs into cell lines to validate their predictions. The CURE is designed to encourage independent problem-solving, science identity, and support career success.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Life Sciences, Health Sciences, Chemistry:Biochemistry
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Using mathematics and computational thinking, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data
Nature of Research: Informatics/Computational Research, Basic Research
State: Georgia
Target Audience: Upper Division, Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Recycle Your Life: Investigating best practices for improving recycling
Michael Black, Georgia State University
This CURE is designed to introduce STEM-thinking and research tools to students with an interest in furthering environmental goals. As the entryway for most starting students is recycling, this CURE is aimed at helping students understand some of the disconnect between understanding recycling (why it is important and what can be recycled) and behaving in a way that matches that understanding (recycling appropriately).

Discipline: Life Sciences, Environmental Science, Sustainability
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations
State: Georgia
Target Audience: Non-major, Introductory
CURE Duration: A full term

Host-Parasite Interactions in Cuscuta campestris
Brandy Rogers, Georgia Highlands College; Tara Suswal, Georgia Highlands College
Cuscuta campestris (Field dodder) is a parasitic plant with a global distribution. It is an obligate stem parasite and a host generalist, capable of parasitizing a wide variety of hosts, many of which are economically important crop species. Cuscuta campestris is considered an agricultural pest due to its ability to cause significant reduction in host productivity. Here, we investigate parasite-host interactions to characterize foraging behavior by parasite seedlings in response to presence of available hosts, and also examine differential attachment success on various host species.

Inhibitors for Malate Dehydrogenase
Dawn Marin, Gaston College
The goal of this CURE is to design, synthesize and test inhibitors of Malate Dehydrogenase. Students will study the structure of the enzyme and propose possible inhibitors that could form intermolecular bonds with the enzyme. Students will choose potential inhibitor molecules that can be purchased or easily synthesized and purified. The binding of inhibitors will be screened using computational docking calculations. Successful Inhibitors will be tested using enzymatic assays.

Discipline: Chemistry, Biochemistry
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research
State: North Carolina
Target Audience: Non-major, Introductory
CURE Duration: A few class periods

La Fermentación: Teaching Cell Biology with Kombucha
Bobbi Johnson, Wenatchee Valley College; Karina Vega-Villa, Wenatchee Valley College
Kombucha is made by introducing a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast) into brewed tea. Health benefits of consuming kombucha are often described, but there is limited research supporting most claims. Additionally, there is conflicting information regarding some specific claims. For example, some websites advocate that frequent consumption of kombucha could reduce symptoms of Candida (a pathogenic yeast) while others claim that kombucha may actually contain Candida yeast or otherwise contribute to the growth of yeast in the body due to the sugar and yeast present in the beverage. The purpose of this CURE is to guide students through core concepts related to introductory cell and molecular biology through the lens of kombucha. Students investigate two hypotheses during the CURE: (1) a student-developed hypothesis related to yeast, bacteria, or kombucha and (2) testing if Candida can be identified in samples of kombucha. As part of the CURE, students learn the core concepts of an introductory cell and molecular biology course, develop basic transferable laboratory skills, and build their science-identity through supported application of the scientific process.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology, Genetics
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
Target Audience: Introductory, Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Microbial Community Diversity and Interactions
Rachel Bleich, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Discipline: Life Sciences, Microbiology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
State: North Carolina
Target Audience: Upper Division, Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Bioenergy Materials for Renewable Energy: A Theoretical and Experimental Approach
Jalaal Hayes, Delaware State University
This course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) will focus on the topic of biomass energy.

Discipline: Environmental Science:Sustainability, Chemistry:Physical Chemistry, Environmental Science:Energy
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data
CURE Duration: Half a term

Phage Investigations
Sonia Singhal, Johnson C Smith University
Bacteriophages -- viruses that infect bacteria, or "phages" for short -- are the most abundant organism on the planet. We can harness them to fight diseases, restore environmental functions, and search for new genes. However, we only know about a tiny fraction of all the bacteriophages that exist. In this lab-based course, students will participate in hands-on research by isolating and characterizing their own bacteriophages from the environment.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Ecology, Microbiology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Field Research
State: North Carolina
Target Audience: Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Flow Cytometry Based CURE – Genotoxic Stress and Immune Cells
Charlie Benson, Georgia State University; Megan Dickherber, Georgia State University
This lab will focus on learning laboratory techniques commonly used in cellular immunology and cancer cell biology research. Over the course of the semester students will conduct research investigating the impact of genotoxic stress and DNA damage agents on immune cell phenotype and function. It is not well characterized how diverse types of immune cells are changed following exposure to such agents. It is important to understand how exposure to such stressors influences cell biology as many such agents are used therapeutically in medicine (radiation and chemotherapy). In particular, the field of cancer immunotherapy relies on the function of immune cells to recognize and attack cancer cells. Thus, the impact of these standard therapies (radiation) on the immune cells themselves is useful knowledge that could help optimize immune based therapies. During the course they will learn the scientific process while also learning common research techniques for eukaryotic cell culture and diverse flow cytometry assays.

Stress and Social Behavior in Cichlid Fish
Edmund Rodgers, Georgia State University
Social bonds are critical to the success of all social animals. However, these relationships are not static: they change over the course of an animal's life experience due to a variety of factors. This CURE is primarily interested in the interconnection between stressful experiences and social bonds. To explore this relationship the lab uses the highly social convict cichlid fish, which exhibit a variety of different types of social bonds: they are monogamous, bi-parental, as well as forming social shoals when not breeding. Students will perform animal husbandry, design experiments, and perform those experimental protocols in small groups. They will then present their findings at a University Research Conference. Over the duration of the course, students receive training in animal care, behavioral quantification, hormone sampling and EIA assay performance, data analysis, literature critique, scientific writing, and oral presentation.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Evolution, Zoology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research
State: Georgia
Target Audience: Upper Division, Major
CURE Duration: A full term