Teach the Earth > Career Prep > Preparing to Teach > Documenting Your Teaching

Documenting Your Teaching

Students in Geology of the National Parks work together to estimate the rate of erosion of the Grand Canyon through geologic time. Photo courtesy of Carol Ormand.

Documenting your teaching can

  • give you an advantage during interviews, where you can show your future colleagues that you not only have teaching experience, but that you have begun reflecting on and learning from that experience
  • improve your teaching, through reflective practice
  • provide evidence of your teaching strengths and accomplishments
(Seldin, 1997, p. 25-27).

If you have developed a teaching statement (sometimes called a teaching philosophy), you have already begun documenting your teaching.

Resources

Jump down to books and articles or example portfolios.

Books and articles

Example portfolios by geoscientists

  • Andrew Zimmerman, (more info) Department of Geological Sciences, University of Florida
  • Patrice Rey, School of Geosciences, University of Sydney (Australia)
  • Stephen Pekar, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Queens College
  • Michael N. Evans, Department of Geology and Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland

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