InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Water Science and Society > Instructor Stories
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Instructor Stories

These stories describe how the materials were adapted for use in three different courses at three institutions. We hope these stories inspire your own use of the materials and give you insight into how to adapt the materials for your classroom.

Mike Arthur instructor photo
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Mike Arthur instructor photo[creative commons]
Provenance: Mike Arthur personal photo
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Michael Arthur: Water: Science and Society at Pennsylvania State University. This was a full-semester blended course with one 60 minute in-person lab / discussion session per week (a longer 75 or 90 minute section may prove more useful in future offerings). Lecture, reading, and video materials for weekly modules were fully online. Students completed the Formative Assessments at home and turned them in during the weekly lab/discussion session; these typically formed the basis of our in-class discussion. Summative Assessments were completed during the lab/discussion session. Students came from various majors, not all were Earth Sciences.

Patrick Belmont instructor photo
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Patrick Belmont instructor photo[creative commons]
Provenance: Patrick Belmont
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Patrick Belmont: Water, Science, and Society at Utah State University. This was a full-semester blended course. Reading and video materials were fully online, but I added about one 30–40 minute lecture for each module to emphasize key points and supplement material. Students completed about half of the formative assessments on their own and submitted them in class. The other half of the formative assessments were completed in class, often as a whole group or in small groups. Most summative assessments were completed by the students outside of class, but we would review them in class and I would provide written feedback within a week of submission. A few summative assessments that required specific materials (Darcy Lab and topo map exercise) were completed in class. Students came from a wide range of majors.

Sliko_China
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Sliko_China[creative commons]
Provenance: Jennifer Sliko, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Jennifer Sliko: Water: Science and Society at Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg. This was a full-semester blended course with one two-hour weekly class meeting in a laboratory classroom. The weekly lecture, reading, and video materials were fully online, and the students completed the formative assessments before coming to the class meeting. At the start of each class, students submitted their formative assessments, and module materials were briefly reviewed during the class meeting. Most of the classroom time was spent completing the summative assessments, which were submitted at the end of the class session. I would provide written feedback within one week of submission. Modules 4 and 9 were completed entirely online with no associated weekly class meeting. Students came from a wide range of majors and took this course to fulfill a natural science general elective requirement.

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »