InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Future of Food > Instructor Stories
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Instructor Stories and Adaptations

These resources describe how the module was adapted for use in different settings. We hope these stories inspire your own use of the module and give you insight into how to adapt the materials for your classroom.

Heather Karsten photo
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Heather Karsten photo[creative commons]
Provenance: Heather Karsten, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Heather Karsten: Future of Food at Penn State University: This 15-week course was offered to beginning students and taught the pilot as a blended course. Prior to each class, students read the module and independently completed a formative assessment and online quiz. Then a 75-minute class each week provided valuable time for discussion and clarification of important course concepts. Students began working on the summative assessment with classmates and assistance from instructors. Some of the modules could be used in other courses, and for biweekly class meetings in which students could engage in active-learning with classmate; or the entire class could be taught only online.

Picture of Gigi Richard
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Picture of Gigi eating watermelon[creative commons]
Provenance: Gigi Richard, Fort Lewis College
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Gigi Richard: Future of Food at Colorado Mesa University: The Future of Food was taught as a 15-week general-education science course for non-majors. The course was taught in a blended format, with class meeting once a week for 75 minutes. Students worked on the formative assessments before class and most summative assessments were performed during the class period with students in small groups, and completed outside of class. Students came from a wide variety of majors and were not familiar with many of the science concepts presented. Supplemental lectures and discussions were conducted at the beginning of class time to clarify concepts that were particularly challenging. Bringing food to class, eating together, and discussing the sources of the food proved to be a particularly useful tool to illustrate some of the issues and concepts discussed in the course.

Head Shot: Steve Vanek
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Head Shot: Steve Vanek[creative commons]
Provenance: Karl Zimmerer, Pennsylvania State University-Main Campus
Reuse: This item is offered under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ You may reuse this item for non-commercial purposes as long as you provide attribution and offer any derivative works under a similar license.
Steven Vanek: Future of Food at Penn State University: This course was team-taught with Heather Karsten, see the above implementation description

Also Related to Future of Food

Addressing Food Security Issues in Your Course
Feb 9 2017 Next Webinar Water and Food Sustainability Wednesday, February 15th 10:00 am PT | 11:00 am MT | 12:00 pm CT | 1:00 pm ET Thursday, February 9th 9:00 am PT | 10:00 am MT | 11:00 am CT | 12:00 pm ET Presenters: ...

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »