InTeGrate Modules and Courses >Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception > Instructor Stories
 Earth-focused Modules and Courses for the Undergraduate Classroom
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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The materials are free and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
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Instructor Stories and Adaptations

These resources describe how the module was adapted for use in different settings. We hope these stories inspire your own use of the module and give you insight into how to adapt the materials for your classroom.

Photo of Kate Darby
Kate Darby: Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception at Western Washington University. The module was used over three weeks in an upper division Environmental Justice seminar course with 18 students. The course was taught through Western Washington University's Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, a nontraditional academic unit characterized by student-driven inquiry and curriculum and narrative assessments instead of grades. Most of the students enrolled in the class were pursuing majors or concentrations in Fairhaven, though a small number were environmental studies or science majors from Huxley College of the Environment. Most students entered the class with strong knowledge and concern for environmental and social issues, and little exposure to the natural or physical sciences. Our class met twice a week for 1-hour and 50-minute sessions, and we completed the module over six class sessions. The module occurred near the end of the ten-week quarter and was linked to previous discussions about the limits of scientific data in representing and drawing attention to the experiences of environmental justice communities.

Photo of Lisa Phillips
Lisa Phillips: Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception at Illinois State University. The module was used over three weeks in a 200-level undergraduate multimodal composition course with 15 students in a computer classroom. Several students enrolled in the elective course to meet general education requirements. A majority of the students were English majors focusing on the professional and technical writing track. The module complemented the course objectives that included analysis and composition of sensory rhetorics used across multiple modes—audio-visual, verbal, image-based, written. The module occurred in the final weeks of the semester and scaffolded onto prior course activities culminating in a department-wide showcase of student work. Student groups presented their mapping activities.

Photo of Mike Phillips
Michael Phillips: Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception at Illinois Valley Community College. The module was used over three weeks in an introductory environmental geology course with 45 students in a lecture hall and small seminar as well as in an introductory environmental science course with 15 students in a classroom. Most of the students were enrolled in the course to satisfy their science general education curriculum requirement. The entire module was adapted to the course setting, and supplemental activities were incorporated into the weekly lecture sessions (and seminars).

Additional Instructor Stories

Helen Brethauer-Gay: Using Mapping the Environment with Sensory Perception in Introduction to Sociology at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
Helen Brethauer-Gay, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University
I used this module in an Introductory to Sociology course that contains students from all disciplines. I placed it right after our section on scientific method and made it very hands on, giving them class time for a large portion of it. They worked first independently and then in groups. The students really enjoyed the process (the data collection) and the creation of the project (the map). I did too. I always enjoy teaching more when I can get the students to enjoying the learning experience and 'hands on' works most of the time. The report section was, as writing seems to be, more challenging.

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These materials are part of a collection of classroom-tested modules and courses developed by InTeGrate. The materials engage students in understanding the earth system as it intertwines with key societal issues. The collection is freely available and ready to be adapted by undergraduate educators across a range of courses including: general education or majors courses in Earth-focused disciplines such as geoscience or environmental science, social science, engineering, and other sciences, as well as courses for interdisciplinary programs.
Explore the Collection »