CURE Collection

Browse through the collection of CUREs that have been submitted by community members. You can use the faceted search at the right to narrow the view of the collection. You can also use the free text search at any time.Contribute a CURE to the Collection »


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Results 1 - 10 of 15 matches

Characterising the prokaryotic ATPase-ome
Alice Robson, University of Bristol
Students work in teams of 3-4 trying to identify and characterise putative ATPase enzymes from prokaryotic organisms. Each student identifies a putative uncharacterised ATPase gene from a range of prokaryotes (archaea and bacteria), and uses bioinformatic methods to characterise the gene. They then work in teams in the lab to clone, express and purify their chosen proteins; finally they characterise the protein using spectrophotometric ATPase assays. The team presents a poster on their work, then each student individually writes a report in the style of a short paper. The student grade is based on three assessed pieces: the lab book (20%), poster presentation (10%, graded as a team), and the report (70%). This course is compulsory for year 3 of our MSci Biochemistry programme, and counts for 20 credit points (out of 120 for the year). The course has been running since 2017 with an intake of 20-30 students per year, all of whom have passed the course.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Microbiology, Chemistry:Biochemistry, Life Sciences:Molecular Biology, Life Sciences
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Informatics/Computational Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term, Multiple terms

BASIL (Biochemistry Authentic Scientific Inquiry Laboratory)
Arthur Sikora, Nova Southeastern University
This curriculum from the BASIL (Biochemistry Authentic Scientific Inquiry Laboratory) biochemistry consortium aims to get students to transition from thinking like students to thinking like scientists. Students will analyze proteins with known structure but unknown function using computational analyses and wet-lab techniques. BASIL is designed for undergraduate biochemistry lab courses, but can be adapted to first year (or even high school) settings, as well as upper-level undergraduate or graduate coursework. It is targeted to students in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, or related majors. Further details about the BASIL biochemistry consortium can be found on the BASIL blog, http://basiliuse.blogspot.com/ The curriculum is flexible and can be adapted to match the available facilities, the strengths of the instructor and the learning goals of a course and institution. These lessons are often used as part of upper-level laboratory coursework with at least one semester of biochemistry as a pre-requisite or co-requisite. The lab has been designed for classes ranging from 10-24 students (working in teams of two or three) per lab section. This lesson can be adapted to laboratory courses for introductory biology, cell and molecular biology, or advanced biology labs.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Molecular Biology, Computer Science, Chemistry:Biochemistry
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Basic Research, Informatics/Computational Research
State: New York
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: Multiple terms, A full term

Genome to phenome: DNA-protein interactions involved in butterfly wing colored development
Michelle Borrero, University of Puerto Rico
We are interested in understanding the genomic mechanisms underlying morphological differences within species. We will use the wing color pattern of Heliconius erato as a model. We have developed a Course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) that will engage undergraduate biology majors in the identification and purification of transcription factors in butterfly wing development. Through this experience students will be able to use the knowledge and concepts from the literature to make and defend decisions, explain the role of DNA binding proteins in the genome to phenome relationship and recognize the application and utility of the techniques used in the research for their career development.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Life Sciences, Evolution
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations
Nature of Research: Basic Research
Target Audience: Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Using the CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering technology to understand gene function in the zebrafish
Anil Kumar Challa, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Using a combination of bioinformatics and lab bench ('wet lab') tools, students design, synthesize and analyze CRISPR reagents that can effectively target specific sites in the genome. We use the zebrafish as a model system to understand gene function.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Evolution
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Using mathematics and computational thinking, Analyzing and interpreting data, Developing and using models, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
State: Alabama
CURE Duration: A full term

A Bioinformatic Look at Iron Uptake in Insects
Emily Ragan, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Students will perform BLAST searches, make phylogenetic trees, identify putative orthologs, and investigate secondary structure elements of 5' untranslated regions (UTRs). The sequences used will be related to iron uptake in insects.

Discipline: Chemistry:Biochemistry, Life Sciences:Molecular Biology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data
Nature of Research: Informatics/Computational Research
State: Colorado
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: Half a term

Genome Solver: Microbial Comparative Genomics
Gaurav Arora, Gallaudet University
Genome Solver began in 2011 as way to teach Bioinformatics tools to undergraduate faculty. As part of the Genome Solver project as a whole, we developed a Community Science Project (CSP) for faculty and students to join. The CSP explores horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between bacteria and the phages that infect them. Students get involved in this project and develop testable hypotheses about the role HGT between bacteria and phages play in microbial evolution. Our own work has demonstrated that undergraduates can produce publishable data using this approach. We invite faculty and their students to participate in the search for additional evidence of this type of HGT by investigating the vast wealth of phage and bacterial sequences currently in databases. All that is needed is a computer, an Internet connection, and enthusiasm for research. Faculty and students can work on an organism of interest or we can help them pick organisms to explore these phenomena. By pooling all of the information from a variety of small projects under the umbrella of the Genome Solver CSP, we will be able to better understand the role of HGT in bacterial evolution.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Genetics, Microbiology, Life Sciences, Computer Science, Environmental Science:Ecosystems, Life Sciences:Evolution
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Using mathematics and computational thinking
Target Audience: Non-major, Introductory, Major
CURE Duration: Multiple terms

From an Inquiry-Guided Project to a CURE in General Biology: Testing Repellent Effects of Essential Oils and a Parasitoid Wasp Against Callosobruchus maculatus.
Joseph Felts, Davidson County Community College

Discipline: Life Sciences:Ecology, Life Sciences, Zoology
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
State: North Carolina
Target Audience: Introductory
CURE Duration: Half a term

The Art of Microbiology: an Agar Art Microbiology Lab CURE
Jeffrey Morris, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Students use agar art made with freshly isolated microbes as a source for developing their own novel research projects.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Microbiology, Ecology
Core Competencies: Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Using mathematics and computational thinking, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Informatics/Computational Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
State: Alabama
Target Audience: Major
CURE Duration: A full term

Genomics Education Partnership
Laura Reed, The University of Alabama
The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership is to provide opportunities for undergraduate students to participate in genomics research. GEP is a collaboration between a growing number of primarily undergraduate institutions, the Biology Dept and Genome Center of Washington University in St. Louis, and the Biology Dept at the University of Alabama. Participating undergraduates learn to take raw sequence data to high quality finished sequence, and to annotate genes and other features, leading to analysis of a question in genomics and research publication. GEP organizes research projects and provides training/collaboration workshops for PUI faculty and teaching assistants.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Molecular Biology, Life Sciences, Computer Science, Life Sciences:Genetics, Evolution
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Developing and using models, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Using mathematics and computational thinking, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Informatics/Computational Research
State: Missouri
Target Audience: Upper Division, Introductory, Major
CURE Duration: Half a term, Multiple terms, A few class periods, A full term

Analyzing datasets in ecology and evolution to teach the nature and process of science
Rebecca Price, University of Washington-Bothell Campus
This quarter-long project forms the basis of a third-year course for majors and nonmajors at the University of Washington, Bothell called Science Methods and Practice. Students use databases to identify novel research questions, and extract data to test their hypotheses. They frame the question with primary literature, address the questions with inferential statistics, and discuss the results with more primary literature. The product is a scientific paper; each step of the process is scaffolded and evaluated. Given time limitations, we avoid devoting time to data collection; instead, we sharpen students' ability to make sense of a large body of quantitative data, a situation they may rarely have encountered. We treat statistics with a strictly conceptual, pragmatic, and abbreviated approach; i.e., we ask students to know which basic test to choose to assess a linear relationship vs. a difference between two means. We stress the need for a normal distribution in order to use these tests, and how to interpret the results; we leave the rest for stats courses, and we do not teach the mathematics. This approach proves beneficial even to those who have already had a statistics course, because it is often the first time they make decisions about applying statistics to their own research questions. We incorporate peer review and collaborative work throughout the quarter. We form collaborative groups around the research questions they ask, enabling them to share primary literature they find, and preparing them well to review each other's writing. We encourage them to cite each other's work. They write formal peer reviews of each other's papers, and they submit their final paper with a letter-to-the-editor highlighting how their research has addressed previous feedback. A major advantage of this course is that an instructor can easily modify it to suit any area of expertise. Students have worked with data about how a snail's morphology changes in response to its environment (Price, 2012), how students understand genetic drift (Price et al. 2014), maximum body size in the fossil record (Payne et al. 2008), range shifts (Ettinger et al. 2011), and urban crop pollination (Waters and Clifford 2014).

Discipline: Environmental Science:Global Change and Climate, Environmental Science, Geoscience:Paleontology, Life Sciences:Evolution, Environmental Science:Ecosystems
Core Competencies: Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data
Nature of Research: Basic Research
State: Washington
Target Audience: Major, Non-major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term