CURE Collection

Browse through the collection of CUREs that have been submitted by community members. You can use the faceted search at the right to narrow the view of the collection. You can also use the free text search at any time.Contribute a CURE to the Collection »


Results 1 - 10 of 58 matches

Community Flood Risk Assessment from Rising/Surging Seas Project
Kevin Kupietz, Elizabeth City State University
Globally 634 million people, 10% of the world's population, live in coastal areas less than 10 meters above sea level. According to 2010 census data, 123 million people, 39% of the United States population, live in coastal counties with an estimated increase to this number by 8% in the 2020 census. As natural disasters have been seen to increase in frequency and severity in the past five years coupled with expected sea rises from climate change it is important that anyone involved with the safety and resiliency planning of their organization/community have an understanding of how to scientifically assess risk from flooding in order to mitigate and recover from the effects. This project allows students the ability to develop skills to utilize computer modeling systems and to apply the data to real world communities in examining risk to structures as well as different groups in the community.

Discipline: Environmental Science, Geoscience:Hydrology, Environmental Science:Sustainability, Land Use and Planning, Oceans and Coastal Resources, Geoscience:Ocean Science, Geoscience, Computer Science, Engineering, Social Sciences, Sociology, Psychology, Environmental Science:Global Change and Climate, Natural Hazards, Ecosystems
Core Competencies: Developing and using models, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Using mathematics and computational thinking, Analyzing and interpreting data
Nature of Research: Applied Research
State: North Carolina
Target Audience: Major, Non-major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

Neurogenetics Laboratory: Mapping a functional circuit for cold nociception in Drosophila
Sarah Clark, Georgia State University
Students will work in small groups to identify neural populations that may be involved in the Drosophila larval response to noxious cold. They will use the GAL4/UAS expression system to excite or inhibit neural populations and assess the impact of their manipulation on the larvae's behavioral response to cold. If a relevant neural population is identified, students will then identify (based on current literature) genes that are likely to be involved in neurite development and/or maintenance in that population. They will use mutations and/or RNA interference to disrupt the function of these genes in the population of interest and assess the effect of the disruption on neuronal morphology and larval behavior.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Genetics
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
State: Georgia
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

Population & Community Ecology
Cascade Sorte, University of California-Irvine
Students in a Population and Community Ecology class participate in coastal marine research focused on understanding factors determining population sizes and community interactions, particularly in the context of species that appear to be shifting their ranges with climate change. Students participate in all aspects of the research from making observations and collecting data in the field to defining questions, stating hypothesis, designing and completing statistical analysis, and interpreting and presenting results. The outcomes are a research proposal, research paper, and poster presentation. All are intended to be at a level appropriate for use as a writing sample or presentation at undergraduate conferences. Results are incorporated into the ongoing research project led by the course instructor and graduate student teaching assistant.

Discipline: Environmental Science:Global Change and Climate, Ecosystems, Oceans and Coastal Resources, Life Sciences, Ecology, Environmental Science
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Applied Research, Field Research, Basic Research
State: California
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division, Non-major
CURE Duration: A full term
On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
Learn more about this review process.

Biomass conversion into highly useful chemicals
SAPNA JAIN, Alabama State University
This is CURE based course that aims at bridging the gap between theoretical knowledge in chemistry and its practical applications at solving real-world problems. It gives students an opportunity to construct and synthesize their knowledge and skills by learning to apply theoretical knowledge to practice by the laboratory research. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the fundamental concepts of chemistry, synthetic methods and techniques. The emphasis will be on novel catalysts synthesis and evaluating their activity towards biomass conversion to liquid fuel and useful chemicals. Students will design synthesize, deduce identities of the biomass conversion products from chemical and spectral clues, and predict reaction products.

Discipline: Environmental Science:Sustainability, Environmental Science, Engineering, Chemistry:Organic Chemistry, Environmental Science:Energy, Chemistry:Analytical Chemistry
Core Competencies: Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations
Nature of Research: Applied Research
State: Alabama
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

Molecular Parasitology
Swati Agrawal, University of Mary Washington
In Spring 2021, we piloted a mini-CURE where student groups from University of Mary Washington and Georgia State University collaboratively completed research projects as part of a research-intensive course on Molecular Parasitology. The benefits of this approach were immediately obvious as students interacted across institutions, learned from each other's disciplinary expertise while informing their own research with data collected by their collaborators.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Molecular Biology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Developing and using models, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Basic Research, Applied Research
State: Virginia
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

MCC: Malate Dehydrogenase CUREs Community
Ellis Bell, University of San Diego
The Malate Dehydrogenase CUREs Community (MCC) project is designed to facilitate the adoption of effective, protein‐centric, Course Based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) into teaching labs at a wide variety of undergraduate serving institutions. (Primarily Undergraduate Institutions, Research Intensive Universities and Community Colleges) MCC coordinates and conducts pedagogical research into two major features of CUREs:1) their duration (whole semester versus 5‐6 week modules incorporated into a lab class), and 2) the impact of scientific collaboration between institutions (a key aspect of much modern research). Using validated assessment tools we seek to establish their effects on student confidence, persistence in STEM, and ability to design research experiments and interprete data. To facilitate faculty adoption of CURE approaches the project provides a number of resources. These focus on a variety of research areas related to Malate Dehydrogenase including mechanisms of catalysis and regulation, adaptation and evolution, cofactor specificity, folding and stability and interactions in metabolons. Resources include biologics, experimental protocols and assessment tools. The project also coordinates interactions between courses at different institutions to allow incorporation of scientific collaboration into CUREs. These collaborations also facilitate the use of more sophisticated experimental approaches and broaden the experimental scope of the CUREs.

Discipline: Chemistry:Biochemistry, Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Life Sciences, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Evolution
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Using mathematics and computational thinking, Planning and carrying out investigations, Developing and using models, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Informatics/Computational Research, Basic Research
Target Audience: Upper Division, Introductory, Non-major, Major
CURE Duration: A full term, A few class periods, Half a term

An Arabidopsis Mutant Screen CURE for a Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory Course
Jinjie Liu, Michigan State University
This CURE is designed from a crucial component of a chloroplast lipid signaling research project and has been implemented for a cell and molecular biology laboratory course at Michigan State University. The research laboratory generated an engineered plant line producing a lipid-derived plant hormone and mutagenized this line. The research question is "what transporters or receptors are involved in the hormone signaling transduction or perception processes?". Students form research hypotheses based on the research model, design experiments, perform experiments, collect and analyze data, make scientific arguments, and share their findings with the learning community. Specifically, the students culture the mutagenized plant population and select the desired mutant phenotypes, followed by genotyping the mutants and characterizing the mutants by basic biochemical approaches. Mathematics is also integrated into the course design. As the students studied the relevant genetic, molecular and biochemical concepts during this CURE, they use the core idea of information flow and data they generate in the lab to make claims about their mutant plants and support these claims with evidence and reasoning.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Molecular Biology
Core Competencies: Analyzing and interpreting data, Using mathematics and computational thinking, Planning and carrying out investigations, Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Basic Research
State: Michigan
Target Audience: Introductory
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

U-CARE: Undergraduate Coral Aquarium Research Experience
Matthew Partin, Bowling Green State University-Main Campus
After completing their gateway biology courses (sophomore or junior year) marine biology students at BGSU enroll in a required Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) called BIOL 3700: Introduction to Inland Marine Research. This course teaches advanced aquarium husbandry, along with aquarium sciences, and aquarium research methods. Other skills taught in the class include scientific design, data collection, and analysis. A large portion of the course is dedicated to conducting research with coral fragments housed in the BGSU Marine Lab. Students work in small groups to answer questions concerning the morphology and growth rates of a variety of coral species based on variables such as water flow (pattern or intensity), light (cycle, color, or intensity), or diet (food type, frequency, or amount). Results are uploaded to a public database to address the long-term goal of predictably inducing corals to spawn in aquaria. Data is shared publically with interested stakeholders.All students in the CURE course are assigned a peer research Learning Assistant (rLA) to serve as a mentor. rLAs are undergraduates who have previously performed well in the course and have advanced knowledge of the Marine Lab, coral husbandry, and the research process. Each rLA oversees 1 group of 5 students. Students meet with the rLAs and instructor weekly. The instructor meets with the rLAs for weekly husbandry and pedagogy training, as well as discussing progress and needs in the CURE research projects.

Discipline: Life Sciences
Core Competencies: Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Planning and carrying out investigations
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Applied Research
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

Analysis of the effects of protein-protein interactions on signaling through a team-based undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course
Daniela Fera, Swarthmore College
We developed a research-based laboratory course centered on a biological problem involving the B-Raf kinase, specifically the mutant that is commonly found in melanomas. One of the major goals of the project for the students is to generate mutants to determine whether a particular region of the B-Raf protein is critical for the interaction with MEK kinase, a downstream target in the pathway. Students analyze the published B-Raf-MEK crystal structure and choose a mutation to generate in B-Raf or MEK that might alter the dissociation constant (KD) of the complex. They design primers, perform PCR to generate their desired mutant, transform and purify the resulting DNA, express the DNA in E. coli, and purify the protein, all before characterizing it. Characterizing the mutant proteins consist of performing basic pull-downs, western blots, spectroscopic absorbance assays, and biolayer interferometry for binding kinetics. Students also engage in group meeting presentations and journal clubs in which they discuss their work and related primary literature, respectively. Group meeting and journal club discussions provide a forum for students to come up with new ideas to analyze their results, or for future work. Students summarize key results in a final presentation and paper, and develop a research proposal based on their work. Data that students obtain from their mutants provide evidence of the importance of a binding region for B-Raf-MEK complex formation, as well as downstream phosphorylation events. Such data will inform future drug discovery programs, as well as form the foundation for students' work in the course the following year. Because working with mutants can result in unpredictable data and results, students sometimes have to adjust their protocols and repeat experiments. Thus, the CURE format of this course also gives students an opportunity to learn to troubleshoot when things do not work as expected, which helps them learn resiliency in science.

Discipline: Chemistry:Biochemistry, Chemistry
Core Competencies: Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering), Analyzing and interpreting data, Planning and carrying out investigations, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Wet Lab/Bench Research, Basic Research, Informatics/Computational Research
State: Pennsylvania
Target Audience: Major, Upper Division, Non-major
CURE Duration: A full term, Multiple terms
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.

Characterizing the Aging Process Using Caenorhabditis elegans and Reverse Genetics
Joslyn Mills, Brown University
Using gene silencing (RNAi) in the nemotode C. elegans, students will identify genetic modifiers of proteins with roles in aging by reverse genetics. Specifically, students will analyze the effect of knocking down genes on the level of aging-related proteins tagged with fluorophores (GFP, RFP, etc.). Each group of students will use function-specific RNAi libraries (transcription factors, kinases, etc) already established in our lab. Furthermore, students will evaluate the effect of genetic modifiers on proteostasis and lifespan. In addition to becoming familiar with C. elegans work and appreciating the use of model organisms, the students will master microscopy, genetic crosses, gene silencing, and molecular and biochemical readout assays such as qPCR and immunoblotting.

Discipline: Life Sciences:Cell Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology
Core Competencies: Planning and carrying out investigations, Analyzing and interpreting data, Developing and using models, Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering), Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering)
Nature of Research: Basic Research, Wet Lab/Bench Research
State: Rhode Island
Target Audience: Upper Division, Introductory, Major
CURE Duration: A full term
CUREnet Exemplary Collection This CURE has been identified as exemplary based on CUREnet's review criteria.
See the activity page for details.