Dave Dempsey

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Earth & Climate Sciences (formerly Geosciences)
San Francisco State University

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (6)

Student Lead Discussions: Articles from the Literature and Final Writing Assignment part of Cutting Edge:Hurricanes-Climate Change Connection:Activities
This is a two-stage assignment. The first stage is a student-led discussion of a set of closely related articles selected by the instructors from the climate change literature. The second stage is an 8-12 page paper on that topic, based on those articles and supplemented with additional articles located by the student.

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Lab Activity: Earth's Energy Budget and the Greenhouse Effect part of Process of Science:Examples
In a previous lab activity, students examine the global, long-term average energy budgets for the earth's surface and atmosphere, accounting for radiative energy as well as other forms of energy. (The numbers come from a textbook.) In the current lab, students: investigate how those numbers compare to observations in global data sets of temperature, solar and longwave infrared radiative fluxes, albedo, and other quantities, which students display and analyze using "My World GIS" software; investigate spatial and seasonal variability in several aspects of these budgets; investigate possible connections between some of these variations and properties of the earth; and compare the observations to theoretical calculations based on the Stefan-Boltzmann relation.

What is the Earth's Average Temperature? part of CLEAN:Community:Teaching Materials
This activity is part of the community collection of teaching materials on climate and energy topics. These materials were submitted by faculty as part of the CLEAN Climate Workshop, held in June, 2011 and are not ...

Activity Suite: How Does The Greenhouse Effect Influence Global Temperature? part of CLEAN:Community:Teaching Materials
This activity is part of the community collection of teaching materials on climate and energy topics. These materials were submitted by faculty as part of the CLEAN Climate Workshop, held in June, 2011 and are not ...

The Greenhouse Effect: Why is the Earth's Surface So Much Warmer than the Earth as Seen from Space? part of CLEAN:Community:Teaching Materials
This activity is part of the community collection of teaching materials on climate and energy topics. These materials were submitted by faculty as part of the CLEAN Climate Workshop, held in June, 2011 and are not ...

Scientific logic: An application to meteorological observations part of Process of Science:Examples
This quiz (which can be recast easily as a homework or in-class exercise) presents students with a typical weather map showing surface weather-station data plots and contours of constant sea-level pressure (isobars). It then poses a series of statements about weather patterns that might or might not be accepted generally by meteorologists based on many years of observations. (These can be interpreted as "hypotheses" about weather patterns.) Finally, for each statement, it asks students to decide whether the observations on the weather map prove the statement; confirm or support the statement well; clearly contradict or disprove the statement; or don't provide enough evidence to say one way or another. To address the question successfully, students must first be able to read the weather map, then apply scientific logic to evaluate each general statement about weather patterns based solely on the evidence on the map.

Courses (2)

Our Dynamic Weather part of Cutting Edge:Introductory Courses:Virtual Workshop 2014:Course Descriptions
"Our Dynamic Weather" explores the nature of weather and how and why it changes. It describes how atmospheric scientists display and interpret weather information and use that information to identify patterns, ask questions, and propose and test possible explanations as part of the process of building models of how the atmosphere works. The course uses the theme of forecasting to discuss how the process of science works in meteorology. Students participate in regular weather forecasting using an on-line exercise provided by Iowa State University.

Planetary Climate Change part of Process of Science:Courses
What are weather and climate, how has climate changed in the past, how do we know, what causes climate to change, and how can we predict future climate? Planetary Climate Change explores scientists' current understanding of the answers to these questions, sometimes applying methods of scientific investigation like theirs. Our study encompasses not only the atmosphere, oceans, solid earth, and living organisms-the separate components of the earth "system"-but also, and more importantly, the interactions among them, which are crucial to shaping Earth's climate and hold the key to predicting future climate and understanding the role that humans might play.

Essay

An Attempt at Assessment and Evaluation Using Portfolios part of Building Strong Geoscience Departments:Workshops:Assessing Geoscience Programs:Participant Essays
Dave Dempsey, Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University Our First Attempt In 2002-03, the faculty of San Francisco State University's Department of Geosciences, led by Karen Grove (former ...

Other Contributions (2)

Dave Dempsey part of Cutting Edge:Hurricanes-Climate Change Connection:Workshop 08:Participant Profiles
Dave Dempsey Geosciences San Francisco State University 1600 Holloway Avenue San Francisco, CA 94132 415.338.7716 415.338.7705 (fax) dempsey@sfsu.edu Activity: Student Lead Discussions: Articles from the Literature ...

A Concept Mapping Assessment of Climate Change Concepts part of Cutting Edge:Student Learning: Observing and Assessing:Activities
After a brief tutorial on hierarchical concept maps, we ask students in a course on planetary climate change to construct a hierarchical concept map about climate, prompted by several leading questions about climate, climate science, and climate change around which we (roughly) organize the course. We conduct this exercise at the beginning and end of the semester, score the concept maps (two scorers with results reconciled and averaged), and evaluate changes in the scores statistically.


Events and Communities

Climate Communication 2012: Leader

Student Learning: Observing and Assessing 2005 Participants

Hurricane-Climate Change Connection 2008 Participants

Assessing Geoscience Programs: Theory and Practice Participants: Presenter

Process of Science Workshop 2009 Participants

Teaching About Complex Systems Using the STELLA Modeling Software Participants

Data, Simulations, and Models Workshop 2002 Participants

Climate Workshop

Strategic Persuasion 08 Participants

Climate and Energy Webinar Participants Jan, 2011

Getting the Most out of Your Intro Courses 2014