LuAnn Dahlman

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Activities (9)

Analyzing the Antarctic Ozone Hole part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:Analyzing the Antarctic Ozone Hole
Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) image of Southern Hemisphere atmospheric ozone concentration for October 1, 1996. Image courtesy of NASA. In this chapter, you will examine Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) images from the EarthProbe satellite that show how much ozone is in the atmosphere over the Southern Hemisphere. You will interpret the images to identify the ozone "hole" that develops over this region every year during the Southern Hemisphere's spring, comparing its size from year to year. Next, you will use ImageJ, a public domain image analysis program, to quantify the area of the Antarctic ozone hole each October from 1996 to 2005. You will import your measurements into Microsoft Excel and create a graph to document changes in the size of the ozone hole.

Creating Custom Map Images of Earth and Other Worlds part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:Jules
Two examples of images you can produce using the Voyager map tool. The "local" map on top is centered on Greenland; the corresponding "index" map (viewed from space) is displayed below. Volcanoes are indicated by orange triangles, and plate tectonic boundaries are in light blue. Click the image to see a larger view in a new window. In this chapter you will become familiar with Jules Verne Voyager, a freely-available online map tool that includes data for Earth as well as 19 other planets and moons. You will create a variety of map images and then save and import the images into a presentation or a word-processing document. While working on this chapter, you will learn to request specific maps and use Voyager's navigation tools to zoom, pan, and create views of planets as seen from space. While exploring you will specify a map's center point, spatial extent, and width by modifying the URL of the data request. There is a large range explore of data that are available to create map images: 100 different types of data are available to characterize portions of Earth. With Jules Verne Voyager, you can create maps that range from simple outlines of countries or tectonic plates to more complex images that include elevation data or show the age of the seafloor. In addition to data for Earth, Voyager has at least one type of data for all planets and moons of the inner solar system. Recent data for Jupiter, Saturn, and many of their moons are also available. In the final part, you will learn a technique that is useful for comparing different planetary bodies: and you will create map images to compare features from different worlds at the same scale. For instance, a map area showing 100 square kilometers on Mercury can be created and compared with a map showing 100 square kilometers on Earth. Additionally, you can can create planet-from-space views of each world that accurately represent the planets' relative sizes.

Annotating Change in Satellite Images part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:Annotating Change in Satellite Images
This chapter walks you through a technique for documenting change detected in before-and-after sets of satellite images. The technique can be used for any set of images that show the same area at the same scale at different times. In this chapter, you will examine three Landsat images of the Pearl River delta in southeastern China. The time series images show the region in 1988, 1992, and 1995. After creating an animation stack (movie) from the three images, you can flip between them to identify areas that have changed. You will observe changes in land use over time, including yearly differences in vegetative cover and lake levels. To document one type of change in the region, you will outline new areas of land created through land reclamation projects. The final product of the chapter is an annotated image showing the new areas and the timeframes when they were created.

Visualizing Carbon Pathways part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:Carbon
Chlorophyll concentrations detected by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite, July 2011. Source: NASA NEO Earth contains a fixed amount of carbon. Over time, all the carbon atoms in the Earth system move among reservoirs in rocks, oceans, the atmosphere, and living organisms as part of a geochemical cycle. However, between one and two billion metric tons of carbon per year are "missing" from the environment. In other words, scientists cannot account for 15 to 30 percent of the carbon that humans annually release into the atmosphere. This lack of understanding about what happens to carbon prevents scientists from developing accurate models. Though we don't have a full understanding of how carbon moves through the Earth system, we have the ability to obtain satellite images that indicate carbon's presence. We can generate animations of these images to help us visualize the pathways that carbon follows. This EET Chapter will introduce you to visualization capabilities available through NASA's Earth Observatory, global map collection, NASA NEO and ImageJ. Using these tools, you'll build several animations of satellite data that illustrate carbon pathways through the Earth system. For instance, you'll build animations of fire images that indicate carbon is being released into the atmosphere. You'll also make animations of plant productivity images that indicate carbon is being removed from the atmosphere and locked into the biosphere.

Drought: Unit Overview part of EarthLabs:Drought
Drought is an ever-present threat to all people whose lifestyles have been built on the availability of water. Across the planet, millions of humans make their homes and grow crops in areas that receive minimal amounts of precipitation. In this EarthLabs module students learn that when precipitation drops below normal, drought conditions can develop and economic, environmental, and social impacts can follow. The unit teaches students to interpret climate data to recognize the symptoms and evaluate the severity of drought. The unit raises awareness of the need to be prepared to face drought conditions that may become more common as our planet warms.

Hurricanes: Unit Overview part of EarthLabs:Hurricanes
In this EarthLabs module, students will do hands-on experiments and study hurricanes in satellite imagery and visualizations. They'll also explore over 150 years of storm data to find out when and where these storms occur. If students are studying hurricanes during hurricane season, they can monitor the position and status of storms in real time. Hurricanes can serve as an exciting entry point into understanding everyday weather, or a culminating topic for an Earth system or environmental science unit.

Corals Unit Overview part of EarthLabs for Educators:Corals
The lab activities in this module were created by Erin Bardar and LuAnn Dahlman of TERC for the EarthLabs project. Why Teach about Corals? The bright colors, unique shapes, and variety of exotic life in and around ...

Hurricanes Unit Overview part of EarthLabs for Educators:Hurricanes
In this EarthLabs module, students will do hands-on experiments and study hurricanes in satellite imagery and visualizations. They'll also explore over 150 years of storm data to find out when and where these storms occur. If students are studying hurricanes during hurricane season, they can monitor the position and status of storms in real time. Hurricanes can serve as an exciting entry point into understanding everyday weather, or a culminating topic for an Earth system or environmental science unit.

Measuring Distance and Area in Satellite Images part of Earth Exploration Toolbook:Measuring Distance and Area in Satellite Images
This image shows the Aral Sea on June 3, 2001. The yellow line shows the former shoreline of this shrinking lake. The red line is the border between Kazakhstan to the north and Uzbekistan to the south. This chapter describes how to set a scale and make measurements from digital satellite images. You will analyze NASA images of the Aral Sea, making distance and area measurements to characterize changes in the size of this freshwater lake over time. Using ImageJ, a freely available image analysis program, first, set the scale or spatial calibration of an image, relating a distance in the image to the distance it represents in the real world. Once this calibration is set, you can measure distances or areas on the image and see the measurement results in real-world units. The technique is most useful and accurate for nadir view (straight down) images. The chapter uses image data from MODIS and Landsat instruments. The ability to measure actual distances and areas from images is useful for interpreting unfamiliar features in satellite images. The technique is also useful for quantifying changes such as deforestation and urbanization that occur over time. To set the scale for a satellite image, you will need to know its spatial resolution. Spatial resolution is a measure of the area on Earth's surface that is represented by each pixel, or picture element, in the image. This information is usually available on the Internet site of the satellite instrument that recorded the image.


Events and Communities

Using Data in the Classroom Workshop 2004 Participants

Using Data in the Classroom Workshop 2005 Participants

Using Data in the Classroom 2006 Workshop Participants

Using Data in the Classroom Workshop 2007 Participants

Using Data in the Classroom Workshop 2008 Participants

Access Data Citizen Science Workshop

Access Data Impacts Workshop