Eyes in the Sky II > GIT Web Course > Module 3 > Week 12 > Exploring Ocean Data with Google Earth

Week 12: Comparing Geospatial Tools

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Exploring Ocean Data with Google Earth

Olive_ridley_swim An olive ridley turtle swimming; Image Source: NOAA

One of the exciting features of Google Earth is the ability to embed images, links to Web pages, and even YouTube videos directly into placemarks that you pin to specific locations on Earth. As you explore ocean data, you'll have a chance to interact with these elements.


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Download the Compressed File of NEO Images and Data About Ridley Turtles

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Launch Google Earth and Add Data Layers

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Explore the Olive Ridley Turtle Dataset Along with the NEO Images

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Take a Screenshot of a Turtle Whose Path You Explore: This Is Your Weekly Assignment

Olive ridley turtles are omnivores; they eat algae, small fish, crabs, shrimp, rock lobsters, jellyfish, and tunicates. They are pelagic, which means they spend most of their lives swimming and foraging in deep water. Olive ridleys have been observed thousands of miles offshore. They can dive to depths of 500 feet to forage on benthic, or bottom dwelling invertebrates. However, these adaptable turtles can also be found swimming in water nearly 10,000 feet deep. Scientists who study how these animals move use satellite images showing sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentration to look for indicators of their movement.

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Add a YouTube Video to a Placemark

Next, you'll create a placemark and embed into it the YouTube video that you watched at the beginning of this page.

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Explore the Ocean Layer in Google Earth

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Resources

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