NSEC Webinar on Advancing Teaching Evaluation Practices

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Start Time: 10:00 am PT | 11:00 am MT | 12:00 pm CT | 1:00 pm ET

End Time: 11:15 am PT | 12:15 pm MT | 1:15 pm CT | 2:15 pm ET

Recording is here.

 

Speakers

  • Ginger Clark, Associate Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs, Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching, University of Southern California
  • Sierra Dawson, Associate Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, University of Oregon
  • Andrea Follmer Greenhoot, Director and Gautt Teaching Scholar, Center for Teaching Excellence, Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas
  • Gabriela Weaver, Chancellor's Fellow, Professor of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Moderator: Deborah Carlisle, Post-Doctoral Research Associate at UMass Amherst and Instructor of Biology at Williams College

Abstract

NSEC is pleased to host a webinar that will explore new models of evaluating science teaching in higher education. The webinar goals are to showcase some exemplary models from institutions who have begun this work, provide time for campus representatives to discuss in small groups the ways that they are evaluating teaching, and highlight ways in which campus change agents can support this work. This webinar builds off of a workshop held by the National Academies on Recognizing and Evaluating Science Teaching in Higher Education. Please note that this webinar is 75 minutes to provide some time for small group discussions.

Audience

This webinar is designed to support STEM Education Centers and may be of interest to Centers for Teaching and Learning with an emphasis in STEM education. We welcome center directors, associate directors, staff, and faculty, who are seeking information regarding how to successfully evaluate the work of their center. Additionally, we invite all individuals associated with STEM education programming, research, and services that pertain to a college or university center.

Resources/Shared Materials/Community Wisdom

 

Logistics

Event Date: October 28, 2020

Event Start Time: 10:00 am PT | 11:00 am MT | 12:00 pm CT | 1:00 pm ET

Event End Time: 11:15 am PT | 12:15 pm MT | 1:15 pm CT | 2:15 pm ET

Duration - 75 minutes

Format: Online web presentation via Zoom web meeting software with questions and discussion.

 

Speaker Bios

Ginger Clark, Associate Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs, and Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching, University of Southern California

Ginger Clark is a Professor of Clinical Education in the Marriage and Family Therapy Program in the USC Rossier School of Education, and is a licensed psychologist.  She was the first non-tenure-track faculty member to be elected to USC's Academic Senate. Currently, Ginger is an Associate Vice Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs and leads USC's Teaching Excellence Initiative. She also serves as the Director of the USC Center for Excellence in Teaching, which provides services and resources to support USC's teaching excellence initiative. She is currently overseeing the Center's large-scale faculty training in online instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Sierra Dawson, Associate Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, and Affiliated Faculty, Department of Human Physiology, University of Oregon

Sierra Dawson's work focuses on defining, developing, evaluating and rewarding teaching excellence, as well as faculty success, unit head onboarding and training, and leadership development. Sierra was hired in 2003 as instructional faculty in the Department of Human Physiology, where she continues to teach pedagogy-oriented courses for both graduate and undergraduate students. Sierra's expertise lies in inclusive, engaged and research-led teaching, and she regularly presents at regional and national conferences on topics related to large class teaching, inclusive teaching, and evaluation of teaching. Sierra is passionate about supporting the continual growth of those around her whether they be undergraduate/graduate students, faculty, or administrative leaders.

Andrea Follmer Greenhoot, Director and Gautt Teaching Scholar, Center for Teaching Excellence,  and Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kansas

Andrea Follmer Greenhoot ("Dea") is Professor of Psychology, Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence (CTE) and Gautt Teaching Scholar at the University of Kansas. Her research in psychology focuses on memory and cognitive development. Her work with CTE explores strategies for advancing transformed teaching and learning, informed by cognitive and developmental science. Supported by grants from the Spencer, Teagle, and National Science Foundations, much of her work has examined course and curriculum design strategies to help large numbers of diversely-prepared students achieve a high level of success in learning. Dea is also Associate Director of the Bay View Alliance (BVA), a consortium of research universities that are studying strategies to promote and support widespread faculty adoption of evidence-based and inclusive teaching practices. She is principle investigator of the TRESTLE project, an NSF-supported collaboration among BVA partners looking at department-embedded expertise and community building as mechanisms for promoting STEM course transformation and improved student learning. She is also leading the KU effort on the TEval project, another BVA collaboration that aims to transform the evaluation of teaching in higher education through the use of a multi-dimensional, multi-source framework.

Gabriela Weaver, Chancellor's Fellow, and Professor of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Gabriela Weaver is Professor of Chemistry and Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Previously, her role was Vice Provost for Faculty Development, and director of the Institute for Teaching Excellence and Faculty Development (TEFD). Prior to coming to UMass, she served as professor of chemistry and science education and the Jerry and Rosie Semler Director of the Discovery Learning Research Center at Purdue University. In 2019, she was awarded a Fellowship with the American Council of Education (ACE), which she carried out at Boston University.  In 2012, she was elected as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to transforming science education at the undergraduate level. She has been a co-author on two chemistry textbooks, the 2015 book Transforming Institutions: Undergraduate STEM Education for the 21st Century, the 2020 book Engaging Undergraduate Students in Research at Scale, as well as numerous scholarly articles, book chapters, and reports of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM). From 2004-2012, she served as director of the NSF-funded multi-institutional project Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE), dedicated to involving first- and second-year undergraduate students in research experiences. Her research interests include educational practices that increase student success and the institutionalization of such practices through the transformation of cultures and processes in higher education.  She earned a B.S. degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

Moderator: Deborah Carlisle, Post-Doctoral Research Associate at University of Massachusetts Amherst and Instructor of Biology at Williams College

Deborah L. Carlisle is a post-doctoral research scholar and the lead researcher for the Network of STEM Education Centers (NSEC). She works across the national landscape with directors and staff of STEM Education Centers and Centers for Teaching and Learning. She is also a professor in the biology department at Williams College. (dcarlisl@umass.edu)

 

This material is based upon work supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation, Award numbers: IUSE 1524832, DRL 1725946, 1726087, 1725959, and 1725956. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

 


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