In a Tiny Squid, Bacterial Toxin Governs Organ Development
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2004-11/uow-iat110904.php

EurekAlert!, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)


This EurekAlert! kids news article features information about the toxic molecule, tracheal cytotoxin, which is responsible for forming a light producing organ in the Bobtail squid-bacteria symbiosis. This toxin has been discovered to have both good and bad effects depending on the type of bacteria and host involved in the symbiosis: on one hand, it could cause disease and massive tissue damage, while on the other, it is vitally important in organ development. These recently discovered effects may force biologists to re-think the relationship between the world's many microorganisms and their host plants/animals.

This resource is referenced here:
Subject: Biology:Ecology:Symbiotic Relations, Habitats:Marine, Biology:Microbiology, Microbiology:Microbiology and Health
Resource Type: Scientific Resources:Overview/Reference Work
Grade Level: Middle (6-8), High School (9-12), Intermediate (3-5)
Ocean Environments: Surface Waters, Deep Waters, Shallow Sea Floor/Continental Shelf
Topics: Biosphere:Ecology:Habitats:Marine, Biosphere:Microbiology, Microbiology and Health, Ecology:Symbiotic RelationsKeyword: Hawaiian bobtail squid