KM McGoldrick

University of Richmond

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Project Leader on this Project

Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics
This site introduces economists to innovative teaching strategies developed both within and beyond the discipline of economics. It provides instructors with the tools to begin integrating and assessing these teaching strategies in their own classrooms and promotes the sharing of teaching innovations among instructors.

Activities (6)

A Send-a-Problem Exercise for Applying Labor Force Participation Models to Popular Press Articles part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Students in an upper division labor economics course practice applying the labor force participation model to retirement decisions using a USA Today article describing recent retirement trends. During the multiple rounds of problem solving facilitated by this send-a-problem, students identify how changes in labor income, nonlabor income, and preferences are described in the popular press. These components of the labor force participation model are then used to compare changes in retirement decisions as described in the associated article with theoretical predictions.

Using Cooperative Peer Editing to Develop Effective Economic Research Questions part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
After choosing a topic for their research projects, students prepare three and justify two effective economic questions based on provided criteria (see Greenlaw, 2006, p 14-19). Student groups then review, critique and enhance the effective economic research questions. This exercise was developed for a capstone research course in economics; however, the process outlined herein can be applied to any research project in any course

Think-Pair-Share: Analyzing changes in supply & demand and predicting impacts on equilibrium part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
In a think-pair-share activity, students first work independently to demonstrate graphically how events change supply and/or demand in specific markets and explicitly describe the adjustment process from the original to a new equilibrium. Students are then paired to share and revise their answers before being randomly chosen to report answers to the larger class. This exercise is designed for a principles of microeconomics course; however, instructors reviewing supply and demand concepts in any course might find them equally useful. Follow up exercises are provided so that instructors might engage students with additional problem solving outside of class or develop additional cooperative learning exercises on these and related supply and demand concepts.

Using Note-Taking Pairs to Enhance Understanding of Difficult Concepts (such as Income and Substitution Effects) part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Students use their class lecture notes in this variation of the think-pair-share technique to review the income and substitution effects associated with a price change, and reinforce their understanding of the law of demand. This exercise is designed for a principles of microeconomics course; however, intermediate instructors reviewing income and substitution effects might find it equally useful. When used throughout the semester, this technique is also useful for helping students better understand complex concepts and take accurate and complete notes.

Understanding the Impact of (Fiscal and Monetary) Policy: Using the Send-A-Problem Technique part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Students in an introductory macroeconomics course practice applying their knowledge of monetary and fiscal policy to specific economic scenarios. During multiple rounds of problem solving facilitated by this send-a-problem, students identify how policy changes can be used in reaction to specific economic conditions or events. They also evaluate such policy changes in terms of resultant impacts on equilibrium conditions.

Where Do I Begin? Using Think-Pair-Share to Initiate the Problem Solving Process part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Interjected as a break in the lecture, this think-pair-share exercise requires students to identify all the information provided in a complex word problem and explain why each piece is either important or not relevant for the problem. This exercise is designed for a principles of microeconomics course, but the process outlined is applicable for any class in which students struggle to interpret and solve complex word problems.

Teaching Method Module

Classroom Response Systems part of Pedagogy in Action:Library:Classroom Response Systems
(or better known as "clickers") This module was initially developed by Joe Calhoun, Florida State University, then enhanced with the valuable assistance from S. Raj Chaudhury, Shelby Frost, Bill Goffe, ...

Other Contribution

KimMarie McGoldrick part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:About this Project:Project Participants
Department of Economics Robins School of Business University of Richmond Richmond, VA 23173 kmcgoldr@richmond.edu Phone: 804.289.8575 Fax: 804.289.8878 Background Information KimMarie McGoldrick is Professor of ...


Events and Communities

Economics in Two Year Colleges Workshop 2011

Developing Modules for Teaching Economics Participants

Developing Modules for Teaching Economics Participants

Developing Modules for Teaching Economics

Spring 2012 Workshop