Ed Barbanell

Philosophy

University of Utah

Ed Barbanell is Professor (Lecturer) of Philosophy at the University of Utah.  His published work includes a book on Water in the American West, and his current research and teaching focuses on sustainability and bioregionalism; he is particularly interested in exploring how eco-phenomenology can be used to integrate value distinctions into the broader environmental dialogue.

Workshop Participant, Webinar Participant, Website Contributor

Website Content Contributions

Course Modules (3)

Unit 1: Recognizing Ecosystem Services and their Relation to the Hydrologic Cycle part of An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources
In this module, students investigate the ecosystem services associated with local landscapes, particularly in relation to water resources. This unit, the first of three, provides students with the foundational ...

Unit 3: Using an Ecosystem Services Approach for Civic Engagement part of An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources
In this unit, students will explore the larger context in which ecosystem services are often utilized and real-world proposals for land-use change typically occur. Presented with a scenario for a proposed land-use ...

Unit 2: Measuring and Modeling Ecosystem Services part of An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources
In this unit, students will model stormwater runoff for a landscape that has different land covers, to reflect the changes in the hydrologic cycle as land use changes. In doing this, they will (a) recognize the ...

Activities (8)

Unit 2.1: Hydrologic Impact of Land-Use Change part of An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources
In this activity, students model the impact of land-cover changes on stormwater runoff using the EPA's National Stormwater Calculator (Calculator). The students are introduced to the Calculator through a ...

On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Collection This activity is part of the On the Cutting Edge Exemplary Teaching Activities collection.
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Courses (2)

Hydrotopia: Toward a Hydraulic Society in the American West part of Integrate:Workshops and Webinars:Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences:Courses
Interdisciplinary case study analysis of historical and emerging water issues in the western United States. Students learn the fundamental concepts and major issues related to water resources planning and ...

Ed Barbanell: Using An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources in Environmental Ethics at University of Utah part of An Ecosystem Services Approach to Water Resources
Provocative Expansion of the Typical Environmental Ethics Course The narrative of Environmental Ethics is currently in flux, steadily shifting away from an almost exclusive emphasis on justifying the protection of "nature", understood primarily as "wilderness," to exploring a broader range of human/nature relationships. Most recently, with discussion of the Anthropocene gaining traction, the role of "nature" in our thinking is quite unclear; if it is best viewed as a set of discrete services that support and sustain human life and well being, then what limits do we have in altering "nature" in the name of improving its services to us? Utilizing the module just before a philosophical discussion of the implications of seeing "nature" as just so many ecosystem services made that discussion much more concrete and "real" for the students.

Essay (1)

Modeling Interdisciplinarity part of Integrate:Workshops and Webinars:Systems, Society, Sustainability and the Geosciences:Essays
Ed Barbanell, Philosophy, University of Utah Any sensible discussion about "sustainability" must, by its very nature, be inclusive, requiring interactive dialogues with a broad array people about a great ...