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Demonstrating discount rates with a reverse auction of presentation dates part of Teaching Methods:Classroom Experiments:Examples
In this reverse auction of assignment delivery dates, student groups submit their "offers" for taking different dates. The groups complete an exercise using their offers to calculate a simple discount rate for future effort, which can be tied to a discussion of the economics of climate change.

Incorporating Community-Based Research in a Course on the Economics of Poverty part of Teaching Methods:Service Learning:Examples
A community-based research project in an economics of poverty course connects students to the issues that nonprofit organizations are facing in serving low-income households.

Cartel game part of Teaching Methods:Classroom Experiments:Examples
This is a game that puts students in a groups to interact as if they were firms in a cartel. This game will illustrate how oligopoly's are inherently unstable.

Teaching Case: This American Life Episode 391: More is Less, 2009 part of Teaching Methods:Classroom Experiments:Examples
This case study is based on NPR's This American Life Episode 391: More is Less, which originally aired in 2009. The story highlights the role health care providers, patients, and health insurance companies play in driving up the cost of care.

Penalty Kicks—A Simultaneous Move Zero-Sum Game part of Teaching Methods:Classroom Experiments:Examples
Penalty Kicks—A Simultaneous Move Zero-Sum Game is an experiment that illustrates the importance of playing randomized strategies. This experiment is appropriate for undergraduate students who have completed a basic game theory module and can be completed in 15-20 minutes.

Using economic theory to predict outcomes: Applying stylized facts from the literature to the Solow Model part of Teaching Methods:Undergraduate Research:Examples
Students often do not understand how to derive a theoretical model and how to manipulate it to get predictions. The emphasis of this pedagocial example is to show students how they can manipulate the Solow model to predict outcomes. Student develop a set of "stylized facts" from a literature search. They then used those stylized facts to manipulate the model to answer a complex real-world question whose answer is ambigous.

Application of oral history to economics: Immigrant Economic Experiences part of Teaching Methods:Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching:Examples
Application of oral history to economics: Immigrant Experiences This assignment will connect an oral history approach to the examination of economic development concepts such as push and pull factors related to immigration decision, job opportunities in the host country, and issues related to brain drain. In addition, students will be able to explore other relevant migration concerns such as assimilation and discrimination. The project develops a student's ability to understand and integrate these concepts from a variety of perspectives and real world situations.

Application of oral history to economics: Family Economic History part of Teaching Methods:Interdisciplinary Approaches to Teaching:Examples
Application of Oral History to Economics: Family Economic History The assignment will connect an oral history approach to the examination of economic concepts such as opportunity cost of attending school, economic crises (inflation and unemployment, etc.), and standard of living over time. Particularly, students will interview parents, grandparents, or family members from older generations regarding the types of work they performed, economic decisions they have made, and the economic conditions while they were growing up. The project develops a student's ability to understand and integrate these concepts from a variety of perspectives and real world situation.

Economic Development of British Colonial America part of Teaching Methods:Quantitative Writing:Examples
Through a close study of a rich set of demographic and economic statistics, students will see the development over 150 years of two similar yet divergent colonies (Virginia and Barbados). They will work through population, land use, and trade statistics with closely-guiding questions in order to find links between one set of numbers and another.

Counting GDP part of Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Working in small groups, students determine how 18 items are included in GDP (or if they are excluded.) Cards turned over one at a time encourage participation by all group members.

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