Climate Change Collection > 00

Name of Resource: Children's Misconceptions about Weather: A Review of the Literature
Climate Change Theme: Misconceptions
Sponsoring Organization: NARST
Intended use: Background materials
Intended audience:
Educator and developer
URL: http://www.csulb.edu/~lhenriqu/NARST2000.htm
Average Review Ratings (Poor to Excellent, 1-5 scale): 4 stars

Description: A paper presented by Laura Henriques at the annual meeting of the National Association of Research in Science Teaching. It is focused on the physical aspects of weather and climate (phase changes, mass, density, heat, energy) but also has some information about climate change. The tables of common misconceptions are well-organized and easy to understand.

Summary of Reviews

Reviewer: Carrie Morrill 4 stars
Comments: I disagree somewhat that the statement "Snow and ice make it cold" is incorrect. It is true that cold temperatures are the cause of snow and ice. Once snow and ice exist, though, they cause an increase in albedo that can perpetuate the cold temperatures.
Read entire review: link text (Acrobat (PDF) 60kB Jun20 05)

Reviewer: Kirsten Butcher 4 stars
Comments: The paper provides an interesting and useful review of misconceptions about weather found in the scientific literature. Common student misconceptions are documented and possible sources for such misconceptions are listed when possibilities can be reasonably identified. This paper also lists some concepts that have been identified as misconceptions in the literature but are technically correct according to consultation with an expert. This paper could provide useful overviews on student thinking for beginning and even experienced educators. It could also provide a basis for discussions and professional development activities among educators.
Read entire review:
link text (Acrobat (PDF) 47kB Jun20 05)

Reviewer:Jack Ganse 4 stars
Comments: The thoughtful and reflective educator would do well to study this document to improve his or her teaching in the area of students' misconceptions about meteorology. No student activities are included with this paper, although there are links to outside resources.
Read entire review: link text (Acrobat (PDF) 44kB Jun21 05)