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Graph Predictions for Position, Velocity and Acceleration part of Just in Time Teaching:Examples
Graphical Just-in-Time-Teaching questions for use before classes in which students explore position, velocity and acceleration graphs.

Virtual Photoelectric Lab part of Teaching with Data Simulations:Examples
This is a virtual lab activity on the photoelectric effect based on a Java applet simulation of the experiment.

Conservation of energy of while rolling down a hill part of Teaching with Data:Examples
Students analyze video clips of kids rolling down a hill on skates, scooters, and bikes to determine whether mechanical energy is conserved.

Measuring velocity of objects using video clips part of Teaching with Data:Examples
Students learn to determine the velocity of moving objects by doing simple analysis of video clips.

Conservation of energy of a rollercoaster using high speed video part of Teaching with Data:Examples
A high speed video clip of a roller coaster is used as an example of conservation of mechanical energy. Student use the video to determine whether mechanical energy is conserved while the roller coaster rolls up, and then back down a hil.

Determining Measured Values and Uncertainty part of Measurement and Uncertainty:Examples
Student practice taking measurements with various instruments and learn to determine the uncertainty of their measured value.

Performing Calculations using Measured Values that Include Uncertainty part of Measurement and Uncertainty:Examples
Students measure the density of pennies to determine their composition. Students practice determining measured values that include uncertainty and practice calculations using numbers that include uncertainty.

Measuring the coefficient of friction of a skater on ice part of Teaching with Data:Examples
Students use video analysis of ice skaters gliding across the ice to determine the coefficient of friction between the skates and the ice. Materials include instructions and six videos that can be used for analysis.

Analysis of simple harmonic oscillator in a single video clip part of Teaching with Data:Examples
One video clip, with embedded graphs, can be used to help students understand the mathematical relationships that describe simple harmonic motion.

A simple motor/generator demonstration for use in interactive lecture part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples
This activity describes a simple clear demonstration of electric generators (Faraday's Law) and electric motors (Lorentz Force). This demonstration can be used as an interactive lecture demonstration.

Contructing a projectile launcher and free falling target part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples
This activity describes the construction and use of a pneumatic cannon and free falling target used to teach the concepts of projectile motion in introductory physics.

An electrostatics puzzler part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples
An interactive lecture demonstration intended to help students use physics reasoning to predict the outcome of a puzzling electrostatics demonstration.

Using PhET simulations to replace real equipment in lab – Circuit Construction Kit part of PhET Interactive Science Simulations:Examples
Labs and tutorials that use equipment such as circuits can be modified to use PhET simulations instead. Research shows that substituting the PhET Circuit Construction Kit simulation for real equipment in a variety ...

Using PhET simulations in a large lecture class – The Photoelectric Effect part of PhET Interactive Science Simulations:Examples
This activity provides a complete curriculum for teaching the photoelectric effect using the PhET Photoelectric Effect simulation in a large-lecture modern physics course. It includes links to powerpoint slides for two to three 50-minute lectures using Peer Instruction with clickers, and one homework assignment suitable for an online homework system. Research has demonstrated that students in classes using this curriculum have a better understanding of the photoelectric effect than students in classes using traditional instruction supplemented by a computerized tutor.

Resources for using PhET simulations in class – PhET Activities Database part of PhET Interactive Science Simulations:Examples
The PhET Activities Database is a collection of resources for using PhET sims. It includes hundreds of lesson plans, homework assignments, labs, clicker questions, and more. Some activities have been created by the PhET team and some have been created by teachers.

Writing your own activities - PhET Activity Guidelines part of PhET Interactive Science Simulations:Examples
You can create your own lectures, homework, and labs around any PhET simulation by using the PhET Activity Guidelines . These guidelines will help you create "guided inquiry activities which encourage students to construct their own understanding," which are the most effective way to use PhET simulations.

Using PhET simulations in high school – Open-ended Pendulum Labs part of PhET Interactive Science Simulations:Examples
These labs provide examples of using very open-ended questions to guide students in exploring a simulation and designing their own experiments. These labs can lead to a high level of quantitative thinking about data analysis.

Introduction to Work and Energy: The Hopper Popper Surprise part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples

Understanding the Motion of a Harmonic Oscillator part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples
This inteactive lecture and series of demonstrations develops the concepts and vocabulary of oscillatory motion as it relates to the motion of a mass on a spring.

Electromagnetic Induction Demonstration part of Teaching with Interactive Demonstrations:Examples
This simple demonstration shows the interaction between electricity and magnetism. Two coils of wire are held close to each other, but not touching. One is attached to a music source, such as a small radio or iPod, and the other is attached to an external speaker. Students can hear the music through the speaker even though there is no direct connection.

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