The ComPADRE Collections

Work: pre, during and post class questions

This page authored by Gay Stewart, University of Arkansas
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This activity has benefited from input through a review and suggestion process.

This activity has benefited from input from faculty educators beyond the author through a review and suggestion process as a part of an activity development workshop. Workshop participants were provided with a set of criteria against which they evaluated each others' activities. For information about the criteria used for this review, see http://serc.carleton.edu/sp/compadre/devactivities/reviewcriteria.html.


This page first made public: Jul 29, 2007

This material is replicated on a number of sites as part of the SERC Pedagogic Service Project

Summary

A picture of students participating in Peer Instruction, from Eric Mazur

This series of questions begins with two questions to be done before class, either as JiTT or homework. Students are then prepared to come to class and engage in in-class peer instruction, building an understanding of the concept of work. This is pulled together by an after-class question that can be used as a homework question or a small-group discussion in a smaller class setting, such as a lab/discussion section, or a small lecture section.

Learning Goals

The goal of these questions is to develop a conceptual understanding of work. The questions probe common misconceptions about work. Students must apply this understanding to a series of richer situations.

Context for Use

These questions are to be used in a sequence: Two pre-instruction questions to be done before class, either as JiTT or homework. The next questions are used for in-class peer instruction. For each question, the students should give individual answers, share these answers in small groups, discuss, and present a concensus answer. There should also be a general class discussion after each question to clarify the material. This is then pulled together by an after-class question that can be used as a homework question or a small-group discussion in a smaller class setting, such as a lab/discussion section, or a small lecture section.

This can be done using from very little technology (show of hands, flash cards) up to an infrared student response system.

Students should have an introduction to work from the reading done with the pre-class questions.

Description and Teaching Materials

The context above fully describes how this can be used All the needed questions, in Word so it can be cut and pasted into whatever format you are using. (Microsoft Word 36kB Jul24 07)

Teaching Notes and Tips

Students must come to class prepared, and be engaged in the in-class activity. Peer instruction has proven to be an effective tool for engaging students.

Assessment

The students' response to the follow-up question will indicate level of understanding. This activity is usually followed up by a lab activity, and qualitative as well as quantitative questions are asked in homework and exams.

References and Resources