ChemPath To Writing Chemical Names and Formulas

Fred Garces, Miramar College, SDCCD, San Diego, CA
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This material is replicated on a number of sites as part of the SERC Pedagogic Service Project

Summary

This tutorial provides background information and rules on Chemical Nomenclature using the Stock system. The student will go through an interactive tutorial to name ionic or covalent compounds. Multimedia of how to name and write chemicals will also be accessed through this interactive activity. Students will also be presented a scenario in which they will need to look up MSDS of common chemicals. Finally, to practice writing chemical names and formulas, a crossword puzzle can be completed.

Learning Goals

By the time students complete this activity, students will be able to write chemical names or chemical formulas. Students can then use this skill in other topics such as stoichiometry, solution chemistry, equilibrium and acid-base chemistry.

Context for Use

This tutorial is for any chemistry course that introduces chemical nomenclature. The level can be varied depending on the student level.

Description and Teaching Materials

All materials in this tutorial can be accessed via the internet using a browser that uses java.

The tutorial can be access from the following links:
  1. http://moodle.chemeddl.org/mod/resource/view.php?id=4787
  2. http://faculty.sdmiramar.edu/fgarces/ChemDL/index.htm




Teaching Notes and Tips

None

Assessment

Progress of the activity is monitored by students answer in the questions posed after each part.

References and Resources

Links:
  1. http://moodle.chemeddl.org/mod/resource/view.php?id=4787
  2. http://faculty.sdmiramar.edu/fgarces/ChemDL/index.htm

The ChemEd DL Summit Resource Course (http://moodle.chemeddl.org/course/view.php?id=78) houses all of the submissions from two-year and four-year college faculty members who have designed resources using the Chem Ed DL (Chemical Educational Digital Library at http://www.chemeddl.org) for use in organic chemistry and general chemistry classrooms and laboratories.

This resource is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. NSF-DUE 1044239 and NSF-DUE 0937796. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.