Brian Hausback

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Geology
California State University-Sacramento

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (3)

Introduction to Google Earth for Geologic Reconnaissance and Interpretation part of Cutting Edge:GIS and Remote Sensing:Activities2
Brian Hausback, California State University, Sacramento Summary Introduction to Google Earth for Geologic Reconnaissance and Interpretation Context Type and level of course This lab is used as an introductory lab ...

Introduction to Air Photos in Geologic Remote Imaging part of Cutting Edge:GIS and Remote Sensing:Activities2
Brian Hausback, California State University, Sacramento Summary An introduction to a wide variety of aerial photos and interpretation of geomorphology and geologic relationships. Context Type and level of course ...

VEPP: Will it Erupt? - Predicting Volcanic Events at Kilauea - Preparing the next generation of DISASTRONAUTs part of NAGT:Teaching Resources:Volcano Exploration Project: Pu`u `O`o:Examples
This is an exercise that is in development and will not be fully tested in the classroom until Spring 2011. Please check back regularly for updates and changes. Using data available from the VEPP website, students will examine time-series geophysical data (seismicity, tilt, GPS) to evaluate Kilauea during June, July and August of 2007. Based on plots of the geophysical data, students will develop hypotheses about geologic events that occurred during the time period indicated. Students will test their hypotheses by using online and library resources to find relevant geologic data. Student products include graphs, data descriptions, correlations of geophysical data sets and a final written or oral report. A second optional part of this exercise examines data from 2010 that illustrates smaller scale magmatic events and challenges students to recognize the importance of scale. Students should also recognize the implications of smaller magmatic events on the lives of the residents of Hawaii and the monitoring of Kilauea by HVO staff.

Course

Geologic Remote Imaging part of Cutting Edge:GIS and Remote Sensing:Courses
This course is designed as an introduction to the use of remote imaging in geologic applications. The basic concepts of image production, processing, and interpretations are covered. Students with a background in basic geologic concepts will gain a new tool with which to observe and study geology features. Remotely sensed image information is more and more widely available in our "Information Age". As the availability of imagery with ever increasing spatial and spectral resolution, remote image analysis becomes an evermore important and efficient tool for geologic and environmental investigations. The course is divided into two parts: Aerial Photography and Digital Image Processing. Students in this course will become familiar with classic and modern use of air photos as a reconnaissance and mapping tool. They will also gain an understanding of theory and practical use of digital remote imaging as applied to geologic interpretation of the surface of the Earth. We will also learn the basics of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) as a tool to display and use remote sensing images with other geologic data. Our introduction to GIS will in no way be comprehensive, but will be extremely useful.


Events and Communities

Using on-line volcano monitoring data in college and university courses: The Volcano Exploration Project, Pu`u `O`o Participants

Using GIS and Remote Sensing to Teach Geoscience in the 21st Century Participants

Teaching Petrology Participants: Presenter