Julie Smith

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Economics
Lafayette College

Materials Contributed through SERC-hosted Projects

Activities (3)

Send-a-problem: Making the connection between data and models part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
Students in an upper division money and banking course practice analyzing economic data and incorporating the qualitative movements in data into a macroeconomic model (aggregate expenditure and output Phillips Curve models). During the multiple rounds of problem solving facilitated by this send-a-problem, students identify how movements in macroeconomic data can be interpreted and applied to a theoretical macroeconomic model.

Think-pair-share: Functions of money part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
In a think-pair-share activity, students first work independently determining how a list of items fulfill all or some of the functions of money in the US economy. Students are then paired to share and revise their answers before being randomly chosen to report their answers to the larger group. This exercise is designed for a principles of macroeconomics course; however, it could also be used in intermediate macroeconomics and money and banking courses.

Using cooperative peer editing to improve writing assignments in economics part of Starting Point: Teaching and Learning Economics:Teaching Methods:Cooperative Learning:Examples
In this cooperative learning activity, students receive feedback from their peers about the quality and clarity of writing assignments. This assignment has three parts: 1)critically reading a peers writing before and methodically generating comments to be shared, 2) during class, reviewing comments provided by their peers and having the opportunity for clarification and 3) participating in a broader class discussion regarding unresolved questions and issues. This exercise is designed for intermediate macroeconomics; however, instructors may adapt the process and supporting handouts for other courses.


Events and Communities

Spring 2012 Workshop