SERC > SERC Staff and Collaborators > Ellen Altermatt

Ellen Altermatt

Contact Information

Education and Evaluation Associate
Science Education Resource Center
Carleton College
ealtermatt@carleton.edu
(507) 222-7938

Professional Experience

I joined the SERC Evaluation Team in January 2019. I have over 15 years of experience conducting basic and applied educational research and teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. My research program has focused on understanding the factors that impact the academic outcomes of K-16 students. I have experience conducting correlational, experimental, and quasi-experimental studies; developing and validating survey measures, including experience sampling measures; performing and coding classroom observations; conducting and coding interviews with individuals and focus groups; collecting and manipulating data from a variety of local, state, and federal databases; and managing and analyzing data using both qualitative and quantitative techniques including mediation analysis, propensity score matching, and hierarchical linear modeling.

Education

Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Developmental Psychology
M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Educational Psychology

Selected Publications and Presentations

Altermatt, E. R. (2019). Academic support from peers as a predictor of academic self-efficacy among college students. Journal of College Student Retention. Advance Online Publication. DOI: 10.1177/ 1521025116686588

Altermatt, E.R., Dine Young, S., & Tuttle, K. K. (2018, June). The Promises and Perils of Assessing Grit and Other Non-Cognitive Skills. Presented at the annual meeting of the Higher Education Data Sharing (HEDS) Consortium, Spokane, WA.

Altermatt, E. R. (2017). Grade-level declines in perceived academic support from peers: A moderated mediation analysis. Journal of Early Adolescence, 37, 760-773.

Altermatt, E. R. (2017). Academic competence perceptions moderate the effects of peer support following academic success disclosures. Social Development, 26, 921-936.

Altermatt, E. R., & Gawronska, M. (2017, September). Ardent about AVID: A community-based participatory research approach to evaluating a college-readiness program. Presented at the annual meeting of the Engagement Scholarship Consortium, Birmingham, AL.

Altermatt, E. R., Dischinger-Smedes, G., & Busch, I. (2017, April). Support from peers following everyday academic challenge and success disclosures predicts college students' academic self-efficacy. Presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychology Association, Chicago, IL.

Altermatt, E. R., & Painter, J. K. (2016). I did well. Should I tell? Gender differences in children's academic success disclosures. Sex Roles, 74, 46-61.

Altermatt, E. R. (2015). Predicting day-to-day changes in students' school-related affect from daily academic experiences and social interactions. Journal of Experimental Education, 83,218-235.

Ryan, A. M., Altermatt, E. R., North, E. A., & McKellar, S. (2015, April). Teacher practices, classroom peer ecology, and student engagement. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, Chicago, IL.

Altermatt, E. R. (2012). Children's achievement-related discourse with peers: Uncovering the processes of peer influence. In A. Ryan and G. Ladd (Eds.), Peer Relationships and Adjustment at School (pp. 109-134). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Altermatt, E. R. (2011). Capitalizing on academic success: Students' interactions with friends as predictors of school adjustment. Journal of Early Adolescence, 31, 174-203.

Altermatt, E. R., & Ivers, I. (2011). Friends' responses to children's disclosure of an achievement-related success: An observational study. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 57,429-454.

Altermatt, E. R. & Broady, E. F. (2009). Coping with achievement-related failure: An examination of conversations between friends. Merrill-Palmer Quarterly, 55, 454-487.

Krantz, J. H., Dine Young, S., Altermatt, T. W., Altermatt, E. R., & Mamberg, M. H. (2008). Encouraging undergraduate research: Hanover College's psychology major. In S. F. Davis, M. Ware, R. Miller, & R. Rycek (Eds.), Promoting, Developing, and Sustaining the Undergraduate Research Experience in Psychology (pp. 78-80). The Society for the Teaching of Psychology.

Altermatt, E. R. (2007). Coping with academic failure: Gender differences in students' self-reported interactions with family members and friends. Journal of Early Adolescence, 27, 479-508.

Altermatt, E. R., & Kenney-Benson, G. A. (2006). Friends' influence on school adjustment: A review of three perspectives. In A. V. Mitel (Ed.), Trends in Educational Psychology (pp. 137-153). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

Altermatt, E. R., & Pomerantz, E. M. (2005). The implications of having high-achieving versus low-achieving friends: A longitudinal analysis. Social Development, 14, 61-81.

Krantz, J. H., Dine Young, S. Altermatt, E. R., & Altermatt, T. W. (2004, April). Integrating research into the curriculum to foster intellectual development regardless of the career path. Presented at the annual meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association, Chicago, IL.

Guzick, D. T., Dorman, W. J., Groff, T. S., Altermatt, E. R., & Forsyth, G. A. (2004). Fostering social interest in schools for long-term and short-term outcomes. Journal of Individual Psychology, 60, 361-378.

Altermatt, E. R., & Kim, M. E. (2004). Can anxiety explain sex differences in college entrance exam scores? Journal of College Admission, 183, 6-11.

Altermatt, E. R., & Pomerantz, E. M. (2003). The development of competence-related and motivational beliefs: An investigation of similarity and influence among friends. Journal of Educational Psychology, 95, 111-123.

Pomerantz, E. M., Altermatt, E. R., & Saxon, J. L. (2002). Making the grade but feeling distressed: Gender differences in academic performance and internal distress. Journal of Educational Psychology, 94, 396-404.

Altermatt, E. R., Pomerantz, E. M., Ruble, D. N., Frey, K. S., & Greulich, F. K. (2002). Predicting changes in children's self-perceptions of academic competence: A naturalistic examination of evaluative discourse among classmates. Developmental Psychology, 38, 903-917.