Building Strong Geoscience Departments > Future of Geoscience > Where is our Research Going?

Where is Our Research Going?

One focus of our 2007 workshop on Connecting Geoscience Departments to the Future of Science: New Structures for Research and Curriculum was the question of where geoscience research is headed. Each of the following presentations addressed that question.

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Opportunities in Global Change and Geobiology/Biogeochemistry Simon Brassell, Indiana University
Future Research Trends in Environmental Geology and Hydrogeology John Fountain, North Carolina State University
Frontiers in Solid Earth Geoscience Donna Whitney, University of Minnesota


Opportunities in Global Change and Geobiology/Biogeochemistry

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This is a 15 minute video.

Simon Brassell, Indiana University

Simon's presentation focuses on opportunities emerging from our improved understanding of systems and processes, from improved analytical capabilities, and from the growth of interdisciplinary collaborations.

View this video of Simon's presentation by clicking on it. Alternatively, you can download the video in quicktime (Quicktime Video 170.2MB Jul13 07) format or download his powerpoint file. (PowerPoint 2MB Apr26 07)

Length of video: 15 minutes, 11 seconds.


Future Research Trends in Environmental Geology and Hydrogeology


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This is a 13 minute video.

John Fountain, North Carolina State University

John's presentation focuses on two major trends in environmental geology and hydrogeology: multidisciplinarity and predicting the behavior of Earth systems.

View this video of John's presentation by clicking on it. Alternatively, you can download the video in quicktime (Quicktime Video 144.2MB Jul13 07) format or download an outline (Microsoft Word 29kB Apr30 07) of John's talk.

Length of video: 13 minutes, 20 seconds.


Frontiers in Solid Earth Geoscience

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This is a 13 minute video.

Donna Whitney, University of Minnesota

Donna's presentation focuses on integrating our understanding of processes from different spheres of the Earth; in particular, making connections between deep processes and surface processes.

View this video of Donna's presentation by clicking on it. Alternatively, you can download the video in quicktime (Quicktime Video 142.4MB Jul13 07) format or download her powerpoint file. (PowerPoint 9.3MB Apr26 07)

Length of video: 12 minutes, 46 seconds.


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