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Quantitative Skills, Thinking, and Reasoning Activities


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Placing a Community: Demographic Contexts
Adriana Estill
This assignment asks students to examine several recent U.S. census tables about Hispanics and educational attainment and write a brief report that details the conclusions they reach.

Interpreting Two Way Tables using GSS data
Jessica Polito
In this module, students use a web tool to construct their own two-way tables comparing variables from the General Social Survey, and then describe the resulting table.

Shift in life expectancy
Holly Partridge
Determining the shift in expected life span over a century and the social and environmental impact

Race and Space
Lindsay Custer, Cascadia Community College
This assignment exposes students to racial inequalities in their own communities and helps them to identify the impact of racial segregation on quality of life. The big ideas in this assignment are racial inequality, residential segregation, and environmental justice.

The Death Penalty
James Chriss, Cleveland State University
Students will use data from the General Social Survey to explore factors which affect attitudes towards the death penalty.

Poverty in the United States
Joan Spade, SUNY- Brockport
In addition to a quantitative analysis that involves univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis, this module reinforces research terms introduced in Intro to Sociology (independent, dependent and control variables and includes the opportunity to discuss sample vs. population (in the comparison of national poverty data vs. the poverty rate in the sample) and value vs. variable (poverty as a value and a variable and the recoding of the values in the household data). The module also uses the Census website to define the concept "poverty threshold" and look at trends in poverty.

Exploring Personal Footprints
Bev Farb, Everett Community College
Students apply the main research methods in sociology to explore their personal footprints (i.e., the global consequences of their individual actions).

Visualizing Social Justice in South Seattle: Data Analysis, Race, and The Duwamish River Basin
Eunice Blavascunas, University of Washington
We examine the factors of race and environmental contamination, starting from the premise (and data proving) that race is not a biological, scientifically valid category, but a social, historical construction with real world consequences for equal access to health, resources, and power.

Teenage Pregnancy in the United States 1950-1990 : Analysis Using Census Data and Contingency Tables
Barbara Johnson
This social science lab exercise uses Census data to examine teenage pregnancy in the United States over time and by socio-demographic variables. Students will learn how to access and interpre data as well as begin to think sociologically about teen pregnancy patterns and risk factors.

What Time Did The Potato Die?
Rebecca Sunderman
Spreadsheets Across the Curriculum module. Simulating a forensic calculation, students build spreadsheets and create graphs to find the time of death of a potato victim from temperature vs. time data.