Teach the Earth > Teach the Earth > Quantitative Activities

Quantitative Skills, Thinking, and Reasoning Activities


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Results 31 - 40 of 55 matches

How Much Energy is on my Plate?
Lane Seely, Karin Kirk
This activity is part of the community collection of teaching materials on climate and energy topics. This activity was submitted by faculty as part of the CLEAN Energy Workshop, held in April, 2011. This activity ...

State Electricity on Google Earth: How many Solar Panels would it Take?
Billy Goodman, Passaic Valley High School; Todd Greene, California State University-Chico; Maureen Padden, McMaster University
This activity is part of the community collection of teaching materials on climate and energy topics. These materials were submitted by faculty as part of the CLEAN Energy Workshop, held in April, 2011 and are not ...

Reasons for the Seasons
Jeff Thomas, Central Connecticut State University
The inquiry method and meteorological and astronomical online data can be used to elicit the inconsistencies of students' naïve ideas about the "real" reasons for the seasons. The first phase of this two-part investigation uses online meteorological data to identify factors that might explain differences of seasonal temperatures among cities These factors are used to hypothesize why differences of seasonal temperatures occur among cities. During the second phase, the variables and hypotheses that were previously identified in part one are used to design and conduct an inquiry-oriented investigation. Astronomical data is used as part of the investigation to "test" students' hypotheses conclusions are drawn then communicated.

Creating a Connection between Everyday Life and Stoichiometry using ChemPrime
This page is authored by Lisa I Smith, M.S., North Hennepin Community College, based on participation in the ChemEd DL summit hosted by the University of Wisconsin - Madison and Catholic University of America.
This activity allows the student to access a webpage that provides examples of stoichiometry using terminology and objects they use in their everyday life. This activity can help a student make a connection between the complex chemical concept of stoichiometry and their current knowledge.

Shift in life expectancy
Holly Partridge
Determining the shift in expected life span over a century and the social and environmental impact

Population Growth, Ecological Footprints, and Overshoot
Rikki Wagstrom
In this activity, students develop and apply linear, exponential, and rational functions to explore past and projected U.S. population growth, carbon footprint trend, ecological overshoot, and effectiveness of hypothetical carbon dioxide reduction initiatives.

Choosing Between Home Appliances: Benefits to the Planet and Your Wallet
Corri Taylor, Wellesley College
Students research various options for new appliances and make purchasing decisions based not merely on purchase price, but also on energy efficiency, which has implications for the planet AND for longer-term personal finances. Students calculate the "payback period" for the more energy efficient appliance and calculate long-term savings.

Plastic Waste Production
Karen Bliss
In this exercise, students will use data to predict the amount of plastic waste in the next ten years.

Economics of installing Solar PV panels: is it worth it to the individual?
Martin Walter
We show that it is economical for an individual to install solar photovoltaic panels in Denver, Colorado; and this is a sustainable strategy for society at large.

Energy Cost of Engine Idling
Ben Fusaro
This is an open-ended but elementary modeling exercise about idling energy behaviors and impacts.