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Quantitative Skills, Thinking, and Reasoning Activities


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Reasoning About Center and Spread: How do Students Spend Their Time?
Shirley Alt
This activity helps students develop better understanding and stronger reasoning skills about distributions in terms of center and spread. Key words: center, spread, distribution

Using Your Hair to Understand Descriptive Statistics
Christopher Malone, Winona State University
The purpose of this activity is to enhance students’ understanding of various descriptive measures in statistics. In particular, students will gain a visual understanding of means, medians, quartiles, and boxplots without doing any computations by completing this activity.

An In-Class Experiment to Estimate Binomial Probabilities
Jessica Utts, University of Califronia, Davis
This hands-on activity asks students to conduct a binomial experiment and calculate a confidence interval for the true probabiity. It is useful for involving students, and for having a discussion about the interpretation of confidence intervals and the role of sample size in estimation.

Seeing and Describing the Predictable Pattern: The Central Limit Theorem
Shirley Alt
This activity helps students develop a better understanding and stronger reasoning skills about the Central Limit Theorem and normal distributions. Key words: Sample, Normal Distribution, Model, Distribution, Variability, Central Limit Theorem (CLT)

Lab 1: Where's the Water?
The lab activity described here was created by Betsy Youngman of Phoenix Country Day School and LuAnn Dahlman of TERC for the EarthLabs project. Activity Summary and Learning Objectives × Photo courtesy of ...

Back-of-the-Envelope Calculations: Energy Released in an Earthquake
Barb Tewksbury, Hamilton College
Question A magnitude 8.5 earthquake (such as the 1964 Good Friday earthquake in Alaska) releases about 1x1018 joules of energy. The atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima released about 1.5x1013 joules of energy. How ...

BotEC: The San Andreas Fault's Rate of Movement
Peter Kresan
Question: The San Andrea is an active fault zone, marked by frequent earthquake activity. The crust southwest of this strike-slip fault (including Los Angeles) is sliding to the northwest relative to the other ...

Arctic Climate Curriculum, Activity 3: Exploring Arctic Climate Data
Karin Kirk, Independent Educational Consultant; Anne Gold, University of Colorado at Boulder
Students dig into authentic Arctic climate data to unravel some causes and effects related to the seasonal melting of the snowpack. In particular, students learn about albedo and its relationship to snowmelt. This ...

Arctic Climate Curriculum, Activity 2: Do you really want to visit the Arctic?
Karin Kirk, Independent Educational Consultant
This jigsaw activity is designed for students to become familiar with several datasets of Arctic weather data, collected in Eureka on Ellesmere Island. Students join a role-playing activity to read and interpret ...

Biking vs Driving
Deirdre Smeltzer
How much difference would biking to work one day per week make?