Exploring Society By The Numbers

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Gender, Occupation and Earnings
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. Regardless of occupation, we find that a higher proportion of women than men fall into the low-income categories. Likewise, a higher proportion of men than women fall into the high-income categories. Students will explore these ideas by analyzing the effects of gender, occupation and education on earnings.

Occupational Sex Segregation and Earnings Differences
For this exercise we will: 1) examine sex segregation in employment from 1950 to 2000. 2) examine trends within three specific occupations of your choosing, and 3) for either doctors or lawyers, investigate gender and race differences on earnings and see if these differences change when we control for age.

Cohabitation
This module is designed to illustrate the effects of selection bias on the observed relationship between premarital cohabitation and later divorce. It also serves as a review of key methodological concepts introduced in the first part of the course.

Diversity in Family and Household Patterns
This module is designed to illustrate differences in family and household composition patterns for different groups based on race/ethnicity and social class. It also serves as a review of key methodological concepts introduced in the first part of the course.

Family Change 1950 to 1990
Students will trace changes in family behavior from 1950 to 1990 and assess their magnitude, considering the pace and timing of these changes. Marital status, number of children and household type will be examined by both race/ethnicity and class.

Families in Social Context: Marriage and Divorce
Students will trace changes in family behavior from 1950 to 1990 and assess their magnitude, considering the pace and timing of these changes. Marital status, number of children and household type will be examined by both race/ethnicity and class. Additional team questions will be introduced that focus on marriage and intimate relationships; fertility and childrearing; divorce; and families and poverty. Students will present answers and supporting data to these questions via class presentations.

Income Differences
Income differences can be measured narrowly or broadly. A narrow definition might include only work for which pay is received, what economists call earnings, which can range from an hour to a year to a lifetime. A less narrow definition of income could add to earnings "unearned" income, which includes sources such as transfer payments, interest and dividends, or capital gains.

The Death Penalty
Students will use data from the General Social Survey to explore factors which affect attitudes towards the death penalty.

Principles of Sociology
We have spent the last few weeks discussing race, class, and gender inequalities and how sociologists conceptualize these inequalities on the structural, rather than the individual, level. In this second research report, you will have the opportunity to apply this structural perspective. You will use U.S. Census data from 1950 to 1990 to analyze shifts in occupational structures in your home state and how these shifts vary by race, sex, or education.

Preparing Community Profiles
People are at the root of community profiling: they create the need for planning functions, and they experience the effects - for better or worse - of planning efforts. ""Community Profiling"" is often essential for effective planning. ""Planning"" are synonymous terms; they mean the same. But unless planners know who ""their people"" are and how their characteristics affect - and are affected by - various professional functions, planners cannot fully meet the needs of the population they are profiling. Thus, although it is not a core planning focus, such as land use or transportation, demographic analysis occupies a position of overarching importance in community profiling.


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