Exploring Society By The Numbers

Browse Modules


Help

Show all pages

Current Search Limits

Subject

showing only Sex Show all Subject

Results 1 - 10 of 27 matches

Teaching Module To Demonstrate Gender and Career Inequalities Are There Gender Inequalities Present in My Intended Career Path?
In this module students use employment data from the 2000 Census concerning adult full-time workers (individuals age 25 and older who work at least 35 hours per week). The question they consider concerns overall economic opportunity, as applied to their intended occupation and the extent to which access to opportunity varies by gender.

Gender, Martial Status, and Earnings
Berk (1985) proposed that the family is a "gender factory"; that is, families are social institutions in which ideas about gender are formed, enforced, and reproduced across generations. This exercise examines the relationships between marital status and earnings among women aged 25 and over, using data from the 1990 U.S. Census. We will attempt to answer the following question: Does marital status influence earnings among women?

Women and Household Structure
While you do the exercises in this lesson, you will find data that look at some of these claims. In the next lesson, we will explore some of the demographic "causes" of the increase in the status of women-declines in both mortality and fertility and an increase in urbanization.

Race and Ethnic Inequality
This activity provides a look at race and ethnicity inequality in the United States over time.

Marriage and Divorce
This activity provides a look at marriage and divorce among different race/ethnicity, ages, education and income levels over time.

Women's Education
This activity provides a look at women's education and the gender gap in education over time.

Education and Earnings: Does Education Pay?
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. In this exercises, students will examine the influence of education on earnings. Do higher levels of education lead to higher earnings?

Investigating the Effects of Race and Gender on Earnings in the United States
Does income differ for men and women, and for whites and people of color? In this exercise, we will examine earnings data for all full-time workers in the US. Students will be able to examine data for the nation as a whole, for Kentucky, and for a state of their choosing.

Gender, Occupation and Earnings
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. Regardless of occupation, we find that a higher proportion of women than men fall into the low-income categories. Likewise, a higher proportion of men than women fall into the high-income categories. Students will explore these ideas by analyzing the effects of gender, occupation and education on earnings.

1 2 3 Next»

©2009 DataCounts!