Exploring Society By The Numbers

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Teaching Module To Demonstrate Gender and Career Inequalities Are There Gender Inequalities Present in My Intended Career Path?
In this module students use employment data from the 2000 Census concerning adult full-time workers (individuals age 25 and older who work at least 35 hours per week). The question they consider concerns overall economic opportunity, as applied to their intended occupation and the extent to which access to opportunity varies by gender.

Population Structures and Cohorts
This module provides a gentle introduction to the use of WebCHIP software and census data to investigate basic population issues. In the first part of this module, you will use data from the 1990 U.S. census to create population pyramids for several racial and ethnic groups. These population pyramids provide the ability to view the age and sex structure of a population.

Education in America
Focusing on education, we will examine the changes from 1950 to 1990 in the numbers, race, gender, and occupations of high school and college graduates. Turning our attention to cohorts and population structure, we will trace birth trends over the past four decades, namely the Baby Boom, and discuss possible causes and effects.

Attitudes Towards Premarital Sex
This exercise asses students' knowledge about attitudes towards premarital sex.

Occupational Sex Segregation
Occupational sex segregation will be studied by focusing on traditionally gender-oriented occupations and analyzing which have an increasing proportion of males or females, and which are still mainly gender-specific jobs. These analyses will be done by age group to study trends at different stages of people's careers.

Education and Earnings: Does Education Pay?
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. In this exercises, students will examine the influence of education on earnings. Do higher levels of education lead to higher earnings?

Investigating the Effects of Race and Gender on Earnings in the United States
Does income differ for men and women, and for whites and people of color? In this exercise, we will examine earnings data for all full-time workers in the US. Students will be able to examine data for the nation as a whole, for Kentucky, and for a state of their choosing.

Gender, Occupation and Earnings
Overall, we see that even when controlling for occupation, gender continues to affect earnings: women make less than men. Regardless of occupation, we find that a higher proportion of women than men fall into the low-income categories. Likewise, a higher proportion of men than women fall into the high-income categories. Students will explore these ideas by analyzing the effects of gender, occupation and education on earnings.

Occupational Sex Segregation and Earnings Differences
For this exercise we will: 1) examine sex segregation in employment from 1950 to 2000. 2) examine trends within three specific occupations of your choosing, and 3) for either doctors or lawyers, investigate gender and race differences on earnings and see if these differences change when we control for age.

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