Exploring Society By The Numbers

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Women and Household Structure
While you do the exercises in this lesson, you will find data that look at some of these claims. In the next lesson, we will explore some of the demographic "causes" of the increase in the status of women-declines in both mortality and fertility and an increase in urbanization.

Marital Trends
The end of World War II created a dramatic increase in births. Known as the "Baby Boom", this trend continued into the early 1960's. During this period, five out of six women in peak childbearing years gave birth to at least two children. Americans were also marrying and staying married. As baby boomers have matured, they have not followed their parent's marriage and childbearing patterns.

Marriage and Divorce
This activity provides a look at marriage and divorce among different race/ethnicity, ages, education and income levels over time.

Cohabitation
This module is designed to illustrate the effects of selection bias on the observed relationship between premarital cohabitation and later divorce. It also serves as a review of key methodological concepts introduced in the first part of the course.

Families in Social Context: Marriage and Divorce
Students will trace changes in family behavior from 1950 to 1990 and assess their magnitude, considering the pace and timing of these changes. Marital status, number of children and household type will be examined by both race/ethnicity and class. Additional team questions will be introduced that focus on marriage and intimate relationships; fertility and childrearing; divorce; and families and poverty. Students will present answers and supporting data to these questions via class presentations.


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