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Phenylketonuira part of Examples
In this activity, students are assigned different alleles of the gene for phenylalanine hydroxylase to research using OMIM (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man). They are then asked to both explain and illustrate how this mutation may cause the disease phenylketonuria (PKU).

Monohybrid Fruit Fly Crosses: A Simulation part of Examples
This assignment uses a computer simulation of fruit fly genetics to have students design and interpret monohybrid crosses of a trait with simple dominant and recessive alleles. Detailed instructions with animated examples, background material, a sample report and a rubric are included.

Sun Spot Analysis part of Examples
Introductory students use Excel to graph monthly mean Greenwich sunspot numbers from 1749 to 2004 and perform a spectral analysis of the data using the free software program "Spectra".

Writing a Wikipedia Genetic Disease Article part of Examples
Writing a Wikipedia article about a genetic disease is a good culminating activity for a genetics course or module, as it requires synthesizing and interpreting a wide range of genetic information. This assignment also includes a potential service component, which is normally very difficult in genetics.

Virtual Photoelectric Lab part of Simulations:Examples
This is a virtual lab activity on the photoelectric effect based on a Java applet simulation of the experiment.

Reese's Pieces Activity: Sampling from a Population part of Simulations:Examples
This activity uses simulation to help students understand sampling variability and reason about whether a particular samples result is unusual, given a particular hypothesis. By using first candies, then a web applet, and varying sample size, students learn that larger samples give more stable and better estimates of a population parameter and develop an appreciation for factors affecting sampling variability.

Simulating Size and Power Using a 10-Sided Die part of Simulations:Examples
This group activity illustrates the concepts of size and power of a test through simulation. Students simulate binomial data by repeatedly rolling a ten-sided die, and they use their simulated data to estimate the size of a binomial test.

Simulating the Effect of Sample Size on the Sampling Distribution of the Mean part of Simulations:Examples
A java applet that simulates the sampling distribution of the mean. It allows students to explore the effect of sample size.

Simulating a P-value for Testing a Correlation with Fathom part of Simulations:Examples
This activity has students use Fathom to test the correlation between attendance and ballpark capacity of major league baseball teams by taking a sample of actual data and scrambling one of the variables to see how the correlation behaves when the variables are not related. After displaying the distribution of correlations for many simulated samples, students find an approximate p-value based on the number of simulations that exceed the actual correlation.

Coke vs. Pepsi Taste Test: Experiments and Inference about Cause part of Simulations:Examples
The Coke vs. Pepsi Taste Test Challenge has students design and carry out an experiment to determine whether or not students are able to correctly identify two brands of cola in a blind taste test. In the first ...

Influence of Outliers on Correlation part of Simulations:Examples
In this visualization activity, students will observe their instructor create a scatterplot and observe how the correlation coefficient changes when outlier points are added. Students are then given a follow up assignment which guides them through the applet. In addition, the assignment provides insight about outliers and their effect on correlation.

Using an Applet to Demonstrate Confidence Intervals part of Simulations:Examples
Students will utilize an applet to further expand their knowledge of confidence intervals.

Stream Characteristics Lab part of Quantitative Skills:Activity Collection
Students determine the relationship between the sinuosity of a river and its gradient by calculating gradients and sinuosity, and generating a graph on Excel. They then test the relationship by making measurements on a picture generated on Google Earth.

Tropical Cyclones and Global Change part of Cutting Edge:Topics:Hurricanes-Climate Change Connection:Activities
This is a full semester project focusing on tropical cyclones and climate change for my undergraduate tropical meteorology class. It consists of five parts, outlined below.

Analyzing Hurricanes part of Cutting Edge:Topics:Hurricanes-Climate Change Connection:Activities
The exercise uses GIS to explore historical data on hurricanes (path, strength, name). Students identify trends in hurricane records, the impact of hurricanes on major U.S. cities, and how hurricanes change through ...

Course profile: Oceans and Our Global Environment part of Building Strong Geoscience Departments:Curricula & Programs:Courses
Simon Brassell, Indiana University Entry level oceanography course, 71-150 students Information for this profile was provided by Simon Brassell in 2007. Information is also available on the course website. Jump ...

Course profile: Oceans and Our Global Environment part of Cutting Edge:Strong Geoscience Departments:Degree Programs:Courses
Simon Brassell, Indiana University Entry level oceanography course, 71-150 students Information for this profile was provided by Simon Brassell in 2007. Information is also available on the course website. Jump ...

Global Patterns part of Cutting Edge:Develop Program-Wide Abilities:Complex Systems:Teaching Activities
Based on my research on how best to enhance students' understanding of complex systems, I utilize various activities to support pattern recognition, a fundamental skill to understanding complex systems ...

Reasons for the Seasons part of Integrate:Workshops:Teaching the Methods of Geoscience:Activities
The inquiry method and meteorological and astronomical online data can be used to elicit the inconsistencies of students' naïve ideas about the "real" reasons for the seasons. The first phase of this two-part investigation uses online meteorological data to identify factors that might explain differences of seasonal temperatures among cities These factors are used to hypothesize why differences of seasonal temperatures occur among cities. During the second phase, the variables and hypotheses that were previously identified in part one are used to design and conduct an inquiry-oriented investigation. Astronomical data is used as part of the investigation to "test" students' hypotheses— conclusions are drawn then communicated.

Lab Exercise: Exploring the Neotoma Paleoecology Database part of Neotoma:Teaching Activities
This lab introduces students and other interested users to the Neotoma Paleoecology Database and Neotoma Explorer. Neotoma DB is a public-access and community-supported repository of paleoecological data, mostly from the late Quaternary. These data are widely used by scientists to study species responses to past climate change.